1960s Classic Cars

In the 1960s, the United States battled with overseas manufacturers for market share, and models introduced in this era ranged from compact cars to muscle cars. Learn about hundreds of cars from the 1960s.

Sportiness and Ford Fairlane were never synonymous -- until the introduction of the 1966-1967 Ford Fairlane 500XL/GT and GT/A. Read more about the clean, aerodynamic lines and other improvements in the 1966-1967 Ford Fairlane 500XL/GT and GT/A

The 1967-1969 Cadillac Eldorado was a revolution for Cadillac, one of the few landmark cars in its multi-decade history. The car's technology wasn't new, but the styling was a sharp departure. Learn more about the 1967-69 Cadillac Eldorado.

The 1967-1969 Chevrolet Camaro was not just a me-too response to Ford's Mustang, though many might think so. In fact it was Chevy's Corvair that first uncovered the market. Learn more about the 1967-69 Chevrolet Camaros.

The first Z-28 was to Chevrolet's Camaro what the Ford's Boss 302 was to their Mustang: a factory-built "ponycar" you could buy straight from the showroom. The Z-28 appeared two years before the Boss. Learn more about 1967-69 Chevrolet Camaro Z-28.

The 1969 Mercury Marauder was part of a long, unfortunate tradition of performance cars that stayed in production despite slow sales. The Marauder came in spite of lackluster market performance. Read more about the poorly-timed 1969 Mercury Marauder.

American Motors reached the pinnacle of prosperity with this Rambler Ambassador. Sales of 1963s exceeded 37,000, a record for the model. The view of Ramblers as economy certainly helped. Get specs and see pictures of this 1060s car.

"Every view is refreshingly new," boasted the sales brochure for the restyled 1960 Oldsmobile. Sounds like typical advertising hype; but this time, at least, it was basically true. Learn about this classic car, get specs and see pictures.

Dropping the respected names of Nash and Hudson led to the development of the 1960-1961 AMC/Rambler Ambassador. The car itself retained the bodyshell of older models, but styling was markedly different. Learn more about its history and specs.

The 1954-1966 Oldsmobile Starfire stood at the top of the Oldsmobile model lineup. The Starfire was offered as a convertible or a coupe model. Learn more about the luxurious classic Oldsmobile Starfire.

The 1966 Exner Bugatti Roadster was the result of three separate auto legends working together. Only 6 chassis/engine combinations were built and only 5 bodies fitted. Learn more about the this rare roadster.

The 1963-1970 Lincoln Limousines were created to compete with Cadillac and Imperial in the limousine trade. They were also known for being the presidential limousine. Read more on the 1963-1970 Lincoln Limousines.

The 1962-1967 Chevrolet Chevy II was a basic low-cost car that was rushed into production to compete against the Ford Falcon. Did Chevy pull it off? Read on to find out the history of the Chevrolet Chevy II.

The 1964-1965 Mercury Comet was restyled in 1964. The Comet also got a boost in luxury and performance. Mercury enjoyed great success with its compact Comet. Learn more about the 1964-1965 Mercury Comet.

The 1961-1968 Amphicar was dual-purpose vehicle capable of traveling on the roads and in the water. The Amphicar saw fairly high production for a rather unusual vehicle. Learn more about the amphibious vehicle.

The 1967-1971 Plymouth GTX impressed collectors with its speed, power, and cubic inches. The Plymouth GTX was known as Plymouth's muscle car warrior with a lot of emphasis taken under the hood. Learn more about the powerful GTX.

The 1955-1975 Citroen DS and ID were considered one of the most technically advanced cars in this world. They caused quite a stir with a strange-looking aerodynamic design. Read more about the Citroen DS and ID.

The 1960 MGA 1600 Roadster was so revolutionary that MG started all over at the beginning of the alphabet and named it the MGA. Although not very fast, the MGA 1600 Roadster had superb handling. Read more about it.

The 1962-1964 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk was a sports car that restored the fun and excitement to luxury motoring. The Hawk was part of a plan to keep Studebaker in the auto business. Learn about the development of the Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk.

Though it hardly changed outside the 1960-1969 Volkswagen Beetle kept getting better under the skin and it became a reassuring presence in the crazy world of the 1960s. Learn about the Volkswagen Beetle's breezy charm that made it a 1960s icon.

The 1967-1973 Jeepster Commando was meant to be a volume product and came in a full range of body styles such as a roadster, pick-up, and station wagon. Learn more about the timless Jeepster Commando.

Design continuity was a factor in the development of the 1966 Buick Riviera. It exhibits the 1963-1965 look, but in a sleeker, more exaggerated form. Learn about the design decisions, development, and details of the 1966-1970 Buick Riviera.

Because of the popularity American Motors Corporation enjoyed during the late 1950s and early 1960s, the company decided to broaden its lineup and compete more directly with the Big Three automakers. Read the story of the 1965-1967 AMC Marlin.

The economy-priced 1959-1964 Studebaker Lark saved the company from financial disaster, but not for long. Learn about the developments and features of the 1959-1964 Studebaker Lark models, introduced before the onslaught of the Big Three compacts.

The 1963 Pontiac Catalina 421 H.O. was a popular performance car with a burly street engine. It enjoyed a popularity revival in the early 1960s due partly to its new-found performance image. Explore features of the 1963 Pontiac Catalina 421 H.O.

Chevelles came in four trim levels for 1965 -- the 300, 300 Deluxe, Malibu, and Malibu SS. Of the six Chevelle body styles, Super Sports came only in convertible and hardtop coupe forms. Read about the 1965 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS Hardtop Coupe.