Collectible and Classic Cars

The Collectible and Classic Cars Channel highlights some of the rarest and most sought-after cars. Learn about cars like the Bugatti, the Tucker, Ferraris and dozens more.


Ford whipped the public into a frenzy back in 1957 with its marketing campaign for the Edsel, "the car of the future." The Edsel was supposed to be everything American car buyers wanted. But — for many, many reasons — it was a terrible flop.

After an unsuccessful (and very expensive) launch in 1957, the Ford Edsel was discontinued in 1959. Everyone knows the Edsel wasn't up to Ford's standards, but was it really as bad as history makes it out to be?

Take a look back to an extravagant and optimistic time when outrageous cars ruled the world. A time when automobiles weren't just about simple transportation -- they were about bold statements and high style.

Gentlemen, start your checkbooks! These classic cars each have a history all their own and a price tag to blow your mind. The starting point is $6.9 million if you want one of these beauties parked in your garage.

Early lowriders cruised the streets of California in the 1930s in customized cars to impress the girls. Find out why these 10 bajito y suavecito cars made our list.

Some people dream of owning a brand new Escalade or Maybach, but others have bigger -- and older -- dreams. If you'd rather drive a classic, the accessibility and ease of car restoration can turn that vision into reality.

Vroom vroom! Hot rods went from a California fad in the 1930s and 1940s to a nationwide trend in the 1950s. Cruise through these hot rod photos and check out some rat rods along the way.

Do you love custom cars? Buckle up and get ready for a wild ride through the world of custom cars, then and now!

These photos showcase some of the rarest, most sought after classic cars from the 20th century's most renowned automakers. Ready to take a drive down memory lane?

The early 1950s were strange times in the U.S. auto industry. The industry had hit a sales slump, and the Korean War was forcing new rationing policies for steel and rubber. Learn how Willys-Overland and Kaiser-Frazer weathered the 1950s slump.

Just a few months after the first Firebirds went to customers, developers were busy with the next generation. This time, The 1970s Pontiac Firebird would not accept Chevrolet's leftovers. Learn more about the Pontiac Firebirds of the 1970's.

Designed in seclusion, the Avanti (the Italian word for "forward") was a styling sensation that gave Studebaker President Sherwood Egbert a brief shining moment before the company discontinued the line.

Mustang not only gained a facelift in 1969, but also its own hot versions, the Mach 1 and Boss 302/429. Tradition demanded that Shelby Mustangs, including the 1969 Shelby GT-350 and GT-500 be somewhat faster, but it wasn't going to be easy.

Pontiac stylists had the ability to periodically impart a refreshing new look to the 1977 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am and Formula without serious modifications to the actual sheetmetal. Learn more about these Pontiacs in this article.

The 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am and 10th Anniversary Trans Am debuted a new look for Firebirds. Learn more the 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am and the 10th Anniversary Trans Am in this article.

Even before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor plunged the United States into the thick of World War II, the jeep's service with the Allied forces was making it almost legendary. Learn about jeep design and roles the jeep filled after World War II.

Mustang put on weight and inches for 1967, and the Shelby followed suit. To keep the car's weight down and its appearance distinctive, Shelby designers created a custom fiberglass front end to complement the production Mustang's longer bonnet.

The world's first minivan, the Volkswagen Bus was for years really just a big, boxy body on a Beetle chassis. But much like the beloved Beetle, the Volkswagen Bus came to symbolize liberty and unconventionality for a whole generation of Americans.

Bill Mitchell, GM's design chief, had complained that the first Firebird "had no real identity." This was not the case with the 1970 1/2 Pontiac Firebird. Learn more about this muscle car here.

Because both the 350-and 400-cid V-8 engines were available this year, the 1971 Pontiac Firebird Formula model lost its "400" suffix. Learn more about the 1971 Pontiac Firebird Formula in this article.

The original '65 Shelby GT-350 was probably as close to a street-legal racing car as was ever offered by an American company. The brains behind the brawn? A Texas chicken farmer turned Ferrari race car driver named Carroll Shelby.

Trans Am already was in the process of developing a legion of aficionados, but you wouldn't know it from the year-end figures from 1972. Learn more about rare 1972 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am.

A bold new eggcrate grille decorated the front end of the base Firebird, Esprit, and the 1973 Pontiac Firebird Formula; but something far bolder could be tucked beneath the Formula's hood. Learn more about the details surrounding the 1973 Pontiac Firebird Formula.

A sloping Endura front end, highlighted by a slim bumper line and modification of Pontiac's traditional divided grille, led off the 1974 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am facelift. Learn more about the 1074 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am in this article.

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