1960s Classic Cars

In the 1960s, the United States battled with overseas manufacturers for market share, and models introduced in this era ranged from compact cars to muscle cars. Learn about hundreds of cars from the 1960s.

The 1964-1967 Ford GT was an underrated but ultimately winning entry in the international racing scene. The original version made its public debut at the 1964 New York Auto Show before heading to European tracks. Explore this classic car.

The Apollo GT was powered by a Buick V-8 and also used its suspension and other GM components. Though successful in many ways, the 1962-1965 Apollo GT was destined for a short run. Learn about and see pictures of the 1962-1965 Apollo GT.

Carroll Shelby first conceived the idea of shoehorning Ford's new small-block V-8 into the light and lively British AC Ace in 1961, and deliveries to America began in 1962. Read about the features and specifications of the 1964 Shelby Cobra 289.

The Ford XL, especially the early models, remains the definitive "Total Performance" car for many enthusiasts. It combined interior elegance with race-winning speed. See pictures and read about this classic car.

The 1967-1973 Mercury Cougar was one of the most loved performance cars of the ponycar age. The styling work began in February 1963, but the new car's major elements weren't in place until late 1964. See pictures and learn about this classic.

The 1965 Mercer Cobra would never have been built had it not been for the Copper Development Association, which wanted to show the practical modern uses of copper in automobile design. Read about the 1965 Mercer Cobra and its captivating copper trim.

Things would never be better for the Chevrolet Corvair Monza station wagon than they were in 1962. The year brought exciting new models and enhanced performance. Learn the story and details of the 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Station Wagon.

The Nash and Hudson auto lines were phased out in early 1957, meaning that American Motors would henceforth rise or fall with the Rambler. Check out the 1965-1966 Rambler Ambassador, the compact car meant to be key to the company's success.

The 1969 Honda S800 is the granddaddy of today's Honda Civic CRX, and the last and most powerful version of one of the first Hondas with more than two wheels. 1969 Honda S800. Read about the 1969 Honda S800, originally the 'light car' model S360.

Is there anyone who doesn't recognize the 1966 Corvette Sting Ray 427? The goals for the most changed Corvette since 1953 were better accommodations and space, and a better ride, handling, performance. Read about the 1966 Corvette Sting Ray 427.

Between the extremes of the 1956 Fury and the 1989 Gran Fury, there exists a marvelous middle ground, including the Furys built between 1965 and 1968. Learn about the development and details of the sporty 1965-1968 Plymouth Fury automobiles.

In 1968, Ford built 4,000 Mustang California Specials that were sold only in the Golden State. Less knowledgeable Mustang buffs can mistake the car for a one-off custom or even a notchback Shelby. Check out the 1968 Ford Mustang California Special.

Although it didn't arrive on the market until January 1966, the new Charger quickly gave Dodge a strong presence in the fastback revival that sprouted in the mid-1960s. See pictures and learn more about this sporty classic.

The 1959-1963 Lotus Elite could make owners celebrate and cry at the same time. The Elite was at once beautiful, infuriating, dauntingly unreliable, mechanically elegant, crude, advanced, uplifting, and rage-provoking. Read about this classic car.

When General Motors decided to field a Ford Thunderbird-fighter, stylist Bill Mitchell decided it should look like a Rolls-Royce with Ferrari flavor. The result, the 1963-1965 Buick Riviera, was a milestone. Check out the 1963-1965 Buick Riviera.

Decades ago, purists could still order a no-nonsense, ultra-high-performance 1960 Chevrolet Corvette roadster by choosing carefully from the options list. Read how this 1960 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster got out the door without luxury goodies.

The 1962-1970 Buick Wildcat name had a certain ring to it. It fairly suggested action -- motion on the open road. Buick's first use of the Wildcat name was on three exciting mid-1950s dream cars. Learn about the story of the 1962-1970 Buick Wildcat.

The 1969 Italia Spider was made by American enthusiast Frank Reisner, who began combining burly Detroit V-8s with lithe Latin bodywork in the late Sixties at his Intermeccanica company in Turin. Read about the design of the 1969 Italia Spider.

The Oldsmobile Toronado personal-luxury coupe returned front-wheel drive to Detroit for the first time since the 1930s and forecasted the revolution that would sweep the U.S. industry in the Eighties. Read about the 1966-1970 Oldsmobile Toronado.

One highlight of the 1964 racing season was Chrysler Corporation's revival of hemispherical combustion chambers for its most powerful V-8s, an effective, expensive design last used in 1958. Read about the 1964 Dodge 330 Super Stock Two-Door Sedan.

The Ford Falcon was a popular sedan in Australia during the 1960s. It represented the first head-to-head challenge to General Motors-Holden's since the GM subsidiary began dominating the market. Learn about the struggles of this classic car.

The 1961-1963 Pontiac Tempest was Pontiac's innovative entry into the compact car market. The story behind the development of the Tempest is one of divisional defiance and cost-conscious innovation. See pictures and read about the Pontiac Tempest.

Some felt that the 1967-1968 AMC Ambassador was a case of too little, too late. With Roy Abernethy at its helm in the 1960s, American Motors set out to compete directly with the Big Three. Learn about the details of the 1967-1968 AMC Ambassador.

Lincoln's 1961 models had timeless style that gave the marque a template for consistent design. But if Robert McNamara had been more insistent, the stunning 1961 Lincoln Continental never would have been seen. Check out the 1961 Lincoln Continental.

The 1962 Studebaker Hawk GT was considered a styling miracle. Hawk sales soared to 9,335 units for model year 1962, nearly tripling the previous year's total. Find out why and what eventually happened to the model through text and pictures.