1960s Classic Cars

In the 1960s, the United States battled with overseas manufacturers for market share, and models introduced in this era ranged from compact cars to muscle cars. Learn about hundreds of cars from the 1960s.

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The 1966-1967 Mercury Comet took on a racier role with cars like the Cyclone GT. They outsold the full-size Mercury each year, making it Lincoln-Mercury's best-selling line. See pictures and learn about the 1966-1967 Mercury Comet.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1962-1964 Ford lineup is often overlooked but the Galaxie was a worthy car. The cars of this era were known for featuring big powerful engines such as the 390 Thunderbird Special. Learn about the 1962-1964 Ford Galaxie including specifications.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1961-1964 Cadillac started with a brand-new design then added improved performance and features each year. While the 1961 Cadillac was very similar mechanically to the previous year's model it looked very different. Learn more about 1961-1964 Cadillacs.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1965 Humber Sceptre Mark II was created by Humber a company known as "Britain's Buick." Unfortunately when the Sceptre was introduced Chrysler was already in the beginning stages of buying the company. Read more about the 1965 Humber Sceptre Mark II.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1965-66 Buicks were created when the company was in a renaissance phase. In those years a restyled family of full-sizers was launched to offer Buick buyers the choice of value performance or luxury they required. Read more Buick history here.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1960-1961 DeSoto line was built with a very short future ahead. Before the 1960 DeSoto was even built Chrysler already made the decision to discontinue the car. Learn about the last two years of DeSoto and see pictures of the last model years.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1964 Pontiac GTO has been called the pioneer of muscle cars. The stiff handling and low gas mileage did little to sway the opinions of car enthusiasts with a love of power. Read about the 1964 Pontiac GTO and view a great photo in this article.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1956-1968 Renault Dauphine enjoyed a long successful run. The original name of this car was to be "Corvette" but Chevrolet beat Renault to the punch. Get valuable design and engineering details for Renault's appealing sedan.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1964-1967 Chevrolet El Camino was popular with consumers due to its abundance of options. The V-8 series of engines featured a 220 horsepower four-barrel carburetor with dual-exhaust. See the evolution of the 1964-1967 Chevrolet El Camino.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

In 1969 and 1970 the Mustang had it all -- except buyers. Learn all about the personalities, the updated designs and the rocky road for 1969 and 1970 Ford Mustangs.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Joe Oros oversaw designs for nearly every Ford vehicle for a dozen years, but his biggest success was a rush job: the Ford Mustang. Read in his own words how the winning design came together.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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Gale Halderman was instrumental in the creation of the first Ford Mustang, sketching the final prototype and overseeing the production of a full-scale model. Read his first-hand account of the process.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Carroll Shelby was as temperamental as his customized Mustangs were powerful in the 1960s. See how his supercharged cars were a hit for Ford and how he then broke away from the company.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

It was the newest thing in showrooms and American culture and everyone seemed enthralled by it -- except for a couple of reviewers. Learn how the 1965 and 1966 Ford Mustang became such hot sellers.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

It was a long journey from the idea of a sleek American sports car to the first Ford Mustang. Learn about the many dead ends and how worried Ford execs settled on the right formula.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1969 Dodge Charger presented perhaps the widest array of choices in the history of the nameplate. There was a base model an available SE (for "Special Edition") option that heaped on more luxuries a hot-performing R/T version and two wild race-bred iterations: the 500 and the Daytona.

Many fans watched "The Dukes of Hazzard" TV show to see a character that never earned a salary -- the General Lee. Recently, the Dukes' 1969 Dodge Charger starred its first feature film, and it ain't just whistlin' Dixie.

By Ed Grabianowski