Other 1930s Classic Car Manufacturers

The Lagonda V-12, the American Bantam and the MG Midget are just a few examples of the exciting cars to surface in the 1930s. View photos and read histories of these and other '40s models.


The 1934-1937 Chrysler Airflows were revolutionary in that they were aerodynamic, but they were not a success for Chrysler. This was one of the first cars that was styled with aerodynamics in mind. Learn more here.

The 1932-1938 Pierce-Arrow Twelve are considered to be the greatest cars made during the Depression. It featured a V-12 engine that was capable of producing 175 horsepower. Keep reading to learn about Pierce Arrow.

The 1928-1934 Duesenberg J-Series automobiles were beautiful, well-built machines that were made in low numbers during the Depression. This car stood out above all others when it was introduced at the New York Salon on December 1, 1928. Learn more.

The 1931-1933 Marmon Sixteens were exciting automobiles that were fast, light, and good at climbing hills. The car weighed about 500 pounds less than the rival Cadillac models because of the extensive use of aluminum. Learn about the 1931-1933 Marmon Sixteen.

The 1927-1932 Mercedes S/SS/SSK/SSKL were super-charged machines, each lighter and faster than the last. The cars were engineered by Ferdinand Porsche, who replaced Paul Daimler, the firm's co-namesake. Learn more about these impressive cars here.

The 1938 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet A was a powerful touring car with a supercharged engine. Only a handful made it to the United States, making it extremely rare. Learn more about the classic 540K cabriolet.

The 1930 Cord L-29 Brooks Stevens Speedster was a customized Cord L-29 designed by Brooks Stevens. It was a particular favorite of Stevens, who still had it at the time of his death in 1995. Read more about his beautiful creation.

The 1938 Peugeot 402 B Retractable Hardtop was inspired by the 1934 Chrysler Airflow. It featured futuristic styling and carried on Peugeot's tradition of being tough and dependable. Learn more about this classic.

The 1932-1935 Graham Blue Streak was a trend setter for the American auto industry during the Depression-era. Its cutting-edge design and performance made the Blue Streak one of the most popular cars at the time. Learn more about the Graham Blue Streak.

The 1939 Chrysler New Yorker Four-Door Sedan was elegant and befitting times with respect to design. The New Yorker sedan sold for $1,298 and weighed 3,695 pounds. Learn more about this elegant classic car.

Duesenberg advertised its Model J, introduced on December 1,1928, as "The World's Finest Motor Car." The 1936 Duesenberg SSJ Speedster was a sight to behold and so special that only two were built. Check out the rare 1936 Duesenberg SSJ Speedster.

The 1936-1937 Cord 810/812 had every hallmark of success: advanced engineering, innovative styling, exciting performance. Yet all were squandered in an ill-fated rush to production. See pictures and explore the 1936-1937 Cord 810/812.

The 1936 Delahaye 135 Competition Coupe was a French-made six-cylinder car. In the late 1930s, the sporty Delahaye Type 135 scored wins in the Monte Carlo Rallye and at LeMans. Read more about this race winning classic.

The 1931-1945 Volkswagen Beetle designs never saw high-volume production because they were interrupted by World War II. But they did lead to the reliable low-cost cars that spread worldwide. Read the story of the 1931-1945 Volkswagen Beetle.

The 1932 Austin-Swallow classic car was born out of a collaboration between two rival British automakers. The Seven debuted as a "tourer" with room for two adults and two children and also featured four-wheel brakes. Explore this classic car.

The years of the Great Depression were desperate times. In those circumstances, Franklin, the plucky little carmaker from Syracuse, New York, produced about 200 air-cooled V-12s, then quietly passed away. Read about the 1932-1934 Franklin V-12 cars.

Most old-car enthusiasts know of the mighty Duesenberg line of vehicles, "The World's Finest Motor Car." Learn how the gorgeous, luxurious, and expensive 1930 Duesenberg Torpedo Convertible Berline stood out above all the other cars of the era.

The 1936 Stout Scarab came about in the early 1930s when William B. Stout, head of the Stout Engineering Laboratories in Dearborn, Michigan, dreamed of a rear-engine, rear-wheel drive combination. Read about the unusual, pioneering 1936 Stout Scarab.

The 1932 DeSoto SC Custom was considered dramatic for its time; all 1932s are somewhat rare today. Read about the rise and fall of DeSoto over its short history, its slow decline during the Depression, and the details of the 1932 DeSoto SC Custom.

The 1929-1931 Cord L-29 was intended to fill the price gap between the Auburn Eight and the mighty J in Cord's miniature automotive empire. Read how the Cord L-29 was engineered along principles patented by famed race-car designer Harry Miller.

Of all the great American marques -- Stutz, Lincoln, Duesenberg, Packard, and the rest -- none was more synonymous with meticulous craftsmanship and refined luxury than the noble Pierce-Arrow. Read on for a detailed history of Pierce-Arrow vehicles.

The 1935 Duesenberg Speedster-Roadster was a custom car for the Maharajah Holkar of India. The speedster sported a concealed top, built-in license plate holder, dual fuel tanks and single-bar bumpers. Learn more about this classic car.

The 1934-1937 Chrysler/DeSoto Airflow was a revolutionary styling sensation, but unfortunately failed to sell. It was a failure so complete that it would cast a pall over Chrysler Corporation design for the next 20 years. Read about the Airflow.

The 1933 Willys Model 77 Coupe, the car that would provide the power for the first jeep and a basis for dragsters, began from a desperate attempt to beat bankruptcy. Learn about the light, quick, compact, maneuverable 1933 Willys Model 77 Coupe.

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