1950s Classic Cars

The 1950s was exciting era for car manufacturers. America’s post-war designs became sleeker and models like the Ferrari gained popularity overseas. Learn about models from Bentleys and Rolls Royce to the 1950s Jeep models.

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The 1958-1960 Rambler American was the single most-popular model in the 1960 Rambler American family thanks in part to its low $1,795 starting price. Read more on the affordable 1958-1960 Rambler American.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1949-1951 Nash Airflytes remain the most successful Nashes in history, but the car did cause some controversy with such flaws as cartoon-like styling, rust, and poor resale value. Learn more about the Nash Airflytes.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1955 Dodge Royal Sierra Custom Station Wagon was designed with "Flair Fashion" styling which featured two- to three-tone color schemes to make cars appear longer and lower. . Learn more about this custom classic.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1950 Morris Minor Series MM Two-Door Sedan was the first British car to reach a million in production. The Minor was highly praised for its gas conserving abilities. Learn more about the Morris Minor MM.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1955 Alfa Romeo Bertone BAT 9 featured a futuristic design that was quite capable of being driven in everyday traffic and delivered good fuel economy. To learn more about this one-off model, read on.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1957-1987 Pontiac Bonneville had its roots in the famous race course of the same name. The initial 1957 Pontiac Bonneville didn't make money, but it was only intended to be an image builder. Find out how the Bonneville transformed Pontiac's image.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Ford styling from 1957 to 1959 produced cars that were both hailed as styling innovations and at the same time shunned as the ugliest cars of the decade. Read about Ford's styling changes throughout 1957-1959.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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Italy's design maestro, Pinin Farina, changed the shape of automotive design while drumming up new business for his expanding carrozzeria. Read the story of the show car, the 1955 Lancia Florida, that touched off a worldwide styling revolution.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1959 Cadillac Cyclone was the last of a short-lived genre of 'dream cars.' Compact but flamboyant, the Cyclone marked the end of an era and capped Harley Earl's career that started in Detroit in 1926. Read more about this futuristic car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1956-1958 Plymouth Fury revived a Plymouth company that had fallen on difficult times. The first Furys were the plushest and most potent Plymouths of the decade. See pictures and learn about the 1956-1958 Plymouth Fury.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

During the 1950s, exotic new body styles were the order of the day at Ford. Among them was the Ranchero, a novel car-pickup that was inspired at least in part by Ford's Australian "Ute." Learn the design and influence of the 1957-1959 Ford Ranchero.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The two-seat 1954-1962 Metropolitan made inroads in the U.S. car market despite its size. For millions of people a second car was no longer a luxury but a necessity, making the Metropolitan a candidate for success. Read about the 1954-1962 Metropolitan.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1950 Oldsmobile Series 76 would be gone after that year due to lagging sales. However, the standard club coupe is a worthy keeper because it's rarity and status of holding down the bottom rung of the Olds ladder. Check out this classic car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Soon after two English automaking rivals joined forces to become the British Motor Corporation (BMC) in the early 1950s, the combine released a new type of small sedan -- the 1953-1958 Magnette. Read about its history and see pictures.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1956 Buick Special Riviera coupe was not as expensive as other Buicks, but today it is just as desirable. It is a good value for collectors on a budget. See pictures and learn about the Buick Special.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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Despite its good looks, the 1950 Ford Custom Crestliner was a slow seller. It was a trimmed-up Tudor with vinyl roof, sweeping two-tone paint treatment, rear fender skirts, and a luxury interior. Read about the 1950 the Ford Custom Crestliner.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Depending on whom you ask, the 1956-1961 Studebaker Hawk was either a clumsy, cluttered version of the breathtaking "Loewy coupe" or a remarkably clever repackaging job. Read about the 1956-1961 Studebaker Hawk, one of the early sporty personal cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1951-1958 Plymouth Belvedere was a low-cost hardtop to compete with Ford and Chevy. The first Belvedere was a two-door hardtop arriving a year behind Chevrolet's Bel Air. See pictures and learn about the 1951-1958 Plymouth Belvedere.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Since their inception in France in 1889, Peugeot automobiles -- like the 1957 Peugeot 203C Four-Door Sedan -- have fanned out around the globe. Read about the 1957 Peugeot 203C Four-Door Sedan, Peugeot's first new design after World War II.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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Dodge lost its stodgy image once and for all with the daring 'swept wing' styling of the 1957 Dodge Coronet Texan. It was a special custom trim model available only in Texas. See photos and learn about the 1957 Dodge Coronet Texan.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

General Motors liked to be first with new concepts, but there's no avoiding the fact that when it created the 1959 Chevrolet El Camino "sedan pickup," rival Ford had been making its Ranchero for two years. Check out the 1959-1960 Chevrolet El Camino.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The anticipated 1958 Edsel Bermuda station wagon was known for its styling, and not always in a good way. The main point of controversy came from the unusual vertical grille on the front end, which was known as the horse collar. See photos of the 1958 Edsel Bermuda.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1957-1958 Buick marked a major restyle for the brand in an attempt to continue its postwar success. This era marked the end of many long-standing series names and Buick's spot as third best in sales. Learn more about the 1957-1958 Buick models.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1954-1956 Oldsmobile lineup was highly popular thanks to its Starfire designs. Oldsmobile introduced three new models intended for 1955 in 1954 after Olds discovered it was capable of early production. Check out the 1954-1956 Oldsmobiles including pictures and specs.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Buicks of the 1950-52 period symbolized the postwar promise and sold a model for every budget. Buicks from this era featured flashy design elements such as the toothy appearance of the front grille. Learn more about the American icon 1950-52 Buick.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide