Biofuels

With rising gas prices and environmental concerns, biofuels may help you not only save money, but also drive a little greener. Discover the buzz about biofuels in these articles.


Used mainly in the U.S. as pancake syrup, sweet sorghum is exploding in popularity thanks to its other uses as a biofuel and animal feed. How can one plant do so much?

The next time you're filling up at the pump, take a minute to consider where that gas came from and how we can produce it more responsibly. Here are 5 ways that eco-friendly biofuels help the planet as well as big business.

Some people believe that algae could very well be the answer to some of our energy problems. But how will we grow enough of it to accommodate all of our needs?

Wine adds flavor to foods and can pair nicely with a meal once it’s served. You can even use it to dye fabrics and soften your skin. But is it really good for making fuel, too?

"Lower than pond scum" may be a great insult; but we're not here to put these micro-organisms down any lower than they already are on the evolutionary chart. In fact, we're here to exalt them.

The U.S. government is offering tax breaks to those who make, mix and sell biofuels to consumers -- but not to the consumers who actually use them. We'll tell you how these tax credits work.

First-generation biofuels don't hold the promise they once did. Will the second generation be able to reduce the world's dependence on oil with affecting the global food supply?

Oil is not only a precious resource, it's also a financial hot commodity for the giant oil companies. That's because we have a love-hate relationship with it.

To cut down on carbon dioxide emissions, governments, car manufacturers and utility companies have been seriously pursuing alternative energy sources. How much do you know about biofuels?

Can we use vegetable oil as fuel in our cars and in electrical generators? The short answer is yes. The longer answer is, well, yes, with a good number of qualifications.

The world produces an astonishing amount of olives -- 21.2 million tons, or 19.3 million metric tons, says the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. It would be a bummer for all those pits to just sit in a landfill.

Instead of relying on futuristic power sources, steampunk-style contraptions look to the past and get their juice from steam. Does steam have staying power as a source of energy?

We’re still a ways from a hemp-powered car, but industrial hemp has made a number of headlines in past years, especially as an alternative energy source. Is hemp the power of the future?

Biofuels -- the word seems magical. It brings to mind singing birds, clear blue skies and global happiness. Somehow, we can turn plants and other organic material into something to power our cars and save the planet at the same time.

Scientists use the term algae to refer to a large and varied group of plantlike organisms often found in water. Like plants, algae are photosynthetic: They convert carbon dioxide into food using the power of sunlight. Could it be used as fuel?

The most commonly used fuel "source" in fuel cells is hydrogen, though other hydrocarbons—and even some alcohols and biofuels—have also been used.

Would you believe corn isn't just potential fuel for you, but also for your car? Welcome to biofuels!

There's no question -- relying on coal and oil for power is a dirty game. Both fuels release greenhouse gases when burned. Both require extensive and sometimes dangerous collection methods.

From wood-burning stoves in Sudan to coal-fired power plants in Pittsburgh, most of the world runs on biomass energy -- energy produced using materials derived from living things

There are plenty of arguments for biorefining as the way to power the future, as well as reasons to wonder if we should think twice about the developing energy source.

The sun provides more than enough energy for all of our needs, but the hard part is harnessing it to be able to use it effectively.

Powering cars with our leftover solid waste. Sounds a little far-fetched, right? Well, it turns out that we're actually pretty close to being able to power cars on garbage like banana peels and beer.

Synthetic fuels, aka synfuels, could be one of the solutions to solving the energy crisis. But what exactly are they and how are they produced?

There may not be a magic bullet to solve the energy crisis, but synthetic fuels offer some advantages -- and drawbacks -- when compared to conventional fossil fuels. Find out about the different types of synthetic fuels and how they're processed.

You hear the word biofuel, and the first things that may come to mind are the cars run on fry grease that make the local news every time gasoline breaks $3 a gallon. But what are some of the non-automotive uses for biofuel?

#}