Biofuels

With rising gas prices and environmental concerns, biofuels may help you not only save money, but also drive a little greener. Discover the buzz about biofuels in these articles.


Switching the world's energy consumption to biofuel makes good sense in some aspects, but the biofuels most likely to be produced on a large scale carry significant drawbacks. What are some of the economic disadvantages of biofuel?

"Biofuel" is a major buzzword in transportation circles these days, and for good reason. However, biofuels, and the process of integrating them into our fuel use habits, can be costly. What are some of the drawbacks of biofuels?

The biofuel industry has become an economic lifeline for dozens of communities. Several studies suggest the industry could add more than 1 million jobs to the U.S. economy in the next two decades. Could one be in your backyard?

As gas prices continue to rise and global warming becomes more pervasive, more people are using biofuels as a way to save money and decrease their consumption of fossil fuels. And while they're definitely not perfect, they have many advantages over types of fuels.

By spring of 2011, the leading international standards board is expected to approve a biofuel for use in jet engines. But is biofuel really a reasonable alternative for jet fuel?

Algae could one day be the answer to our dependence on fossil fuels. Why? Because it can be converted into oil via several different methods that are relatively inexpensive and safe. Read just how it happens here.

Scientists are focusing a lot of research -- and money -- on biofuel technology. The good news is the fuels are out there and in general, they're sustainable and better for the environment than fossil fuels. But they still have their downfalls, one being they're still expensive to produce. Read on to find out more about five of the "cheapest" biofuels.

The gasoline and petroleum-based diesel fuels that power most of the world's automobiles are fairly far removed from anything safe to consume, but that's changing. What are some of the most common edible biofuels?

Biofuels -- or fuels made from plants like wheat, corn, soybean and sugarcane -- burn clean, release fewer pollutants and greenhouse gases, and are sustainable. Could these "energy crops" really be the end to our addiction to fossil fuels like oil?

Experts say we must decrease our dependence on fossil fuels and find alternative sources of energy. One of those alternatives is to create fuel from plants, known as biofuels. But how do these energy crops impact our society and environment?

Since many popular biofuel crops are also commonly used as staple foods, critics of biofuel mass production warn that a spike in crop demand for biofuel could overload agricultural capacity. But is this a verifiable threat?