Other Sports Car Manufacturers

Learn about other sports car manufacturers and stack up pictures, specifications and history of your favorite models. Explore other sports car manufacturers.

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You go to the Los Angeles Auto Show to see cars that can tear it up. We bring you four from this year's auto show.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

With a fire-breathing V-10 engine under its hood, the 2013 SRT Viper comes across like Superman in a world of 4-cylinder Clark Kents.

By Christopher Lampton

Feeling the need for speed? Get your fix here -- our sports car image gallery features some of the fastest, most powerful models the automotive world has ever known.

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Our Lamborghini image gallery showcases some of Lamborghini's most amazing car line-ups. Check out these pictures of Lamborghini's fastest and most exotic cars in this image gallery.

With such dedication to the Aston Martin brand, most fans eagerly anticipate any news of an upcoming concept. Although the car is scheduled for production in 2009, Internet bloggers are already frothing at the mouth over the Rapide.

By John Fuller

High-performance aficionados gained a new choice-a beastly, if not nasty, GTA rendition of the long-lived Trans Am. Learn more about the 1987 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am GTA in this article.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Other General Motors vehicles had downsized in the late 1970s, and now it was Firebird's turn, shrinking to a 101-inch wheelbase and losing more than eight inches in overall length. Learn more about the 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The Nissan 350Z was designed to be practical in terms of technology and price. The Nissan 350Z appealed to driving enthusiasts since its introduction as a 2003 model. Learn how Nissan designers and engineers developed the new Nissan Z car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1952 Siata 208S Spyder was a popular choice among race car drivers. Powered by a Fiat 2.0-liter V-8 engine, the Siata was capable of reaching a top speed of 110 mph. Learn more about this little roadster.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1957 Devin SS had a sporty look and a fast engine, in keeping with designer Bill Devin's background as a car racer. It received mixed reviews but drivers and enthusiasts loved it. Learn more about the Devin SS.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1938 Talbot-Lago's design was considered extremely progressive. Talbot-Lago wanted their cars to be known as luxurious and fast speedsters, so an almighty Hemi engine was used to provide loads of torque and durability. Learn more about the this exotic.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1959 Bocar XP-5 was created to be the fastest and safest sports car in the world. The XP-5's acceleration would qualify for a near-supercar ranking even today. Learn more about this incredible sports car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1953 Woodill Wildfire was Robert Woodill's failed attempt to create an affordable sports car like Jaguar's. Woodill wasn't the only one to fail at producing a new novel car. Read more about this limited production fiberglass sports car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1954 OSCA MT-4 sports racer is the world's most famous sports-racing OSCA. Its dual-overhead-cam four displaced just 1-1/2 liters (1,452 cc), and horsepower totaled only 130 at 6,300 rpm. Learn how the 1954 OSCA MT-4 Sports Racer overachieved.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

By 1955, the MG-TF had become rather dated. MG enthusiasts the world over clamored for something more modern and faster to keep pace with the new Triumph TR-2. The 1955-1962 MGA was Abingdon's answer. Learn details and history of the 1955-1962 MGA.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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Alfa Romeo trained its sights on creating an affordable small sedan in the early 1950s. Read how the temptation to make something livelier and more exciting of the new car resulted in a real jewel, the 1954-1965 Alfa Romeo Giulietta and Giulia.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

A humble start is never an absolute impediment to making great cars. Automotive history is rich with admired vehicles made with ingenious use of existing parts and stretching of scarce funds. Read about one example, the 1953 Triumph TR2 Roadster.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1965-1967 Buick Gran Sport was a Skylark-based performance option that became available mid-1965. Buick renamed their 401 engine to the 400 which turned out to be a perfect fit for the A-body Skylark. Find out how the Buick Gran Sport stacked up.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1957-1980 Lotus Seven is pure sports car intended to be affordable but with virtually no amenities. It was originally offered as a kit that required assembly. Learn about the 1957-1980 Lotus Seven including the production facts and specifications.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The first offerings from Swiss automaker Monteverdi, the 375-series held their own against cars of the time. The first Monteverdi was a two-seat semi-fastback coupe dubbed the Monteverdi 375S. Learn more about Monteverdi sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Stylish, but plagued with cost issues, the Nissan 300ZX Turbo marked the death of affordable high-tech sports cars. The 3-liter, twin cam V-6 gave the 300ZX Turbo a healthy turn of speed to match its slick exterior. Learn about Nissan sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Originally planned as a commuter car, the Pontiac Fiero earned a place among sports cars of the '80s. The Fiero was Pontiac's first and only mid-engine two-seater. Learn more about Pontiac sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Started as a 1970s exotic car the Vector finally came to life under the hands of Lamborghini's parent company. The M12 was powered by a Lamborghini V-12, and featured jack-knife doors and sleek European styling. Learn more about Vector sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The self-titled Nash-Healey endured over many years of production but never quite caught on. It led to the creation of a more affordable, Austin-powered sports car. Learn more about Nash-Healey sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Founded in 1937 to build aircrafts, Saab turned its postwar attention to making reliable luxury and sports cars. Saab decided to try producing sports cars after early models proved quite capable in European road rallies. Learn more about Saab sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide