Other American Sports Car Manufacturers

Learn about other American sports car manufacturers and get specs and pictures of your favorite models, including the Kurtis, the AMX, the Shelby and Pontiac models.

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With a fire-breathing V-10 engine under its hood, the 2013 SRT Viper comes across like Superman in a world of 4-cylinder Clark Kents.

By Christopher Lampton

Other General Motors vehicles had downsized in the late 1970s, and now it was Firebird's turn, shrinking to a 101-inch wheelbase and losing more than eight inches in overall length. Learn more about the 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1957 Devin SS had a sporty look and a fast engine, in keeping with designer Bill Devin's background as a car racer. It received mixed reviews but drivers and enthusiasts loved it. Learn more about the Devin SS.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1959 Bocar XP-5 was created to be the fastest and safest sports car in the world. The XP-5's acceleration would qualify for a near-supercar ranking even today. Learn more about this incredible sports car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1953 Woodill Wildfire was Robert Woodill's failed attempt to create an affordable sports car like Jaguar's. Woodill wasn't the only one to fail at producing a new novel car. Read more about this limited production fiberglass sports car.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

A humble start is never an absolute impediment to making great cars. Automotive history is rich with admired vehicles made with ingenious use of existing parts and stretching of scarce funds. Read about one example, the 1953 Triumph TR2 Roadster.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1965-1967 Buick Gran Sport was a Skylark-based performance option that became available mid-1965. Buick renamed their 401 engine to the 400 which turned out to be a perfect fit for the A-body Skylark. Find out how the Buick Gran Sport stacked up.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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Originally planned as a commuter car, the Pontiac Fiero earned a place among sports cars of the '80s. The Fiero was Pontiac's first and only mid-engine two-seater. Learn more about Pontiac sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The self-titled Nash-Healey endured over many years of production but never quite caught on. It led to the creation of a more affordable, Austin-powered sports car. Learn more about Nash-Healey sports cars.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The Cunningham C-3 Continental took cues from both sides of the Atlantic with Italian style and an American engine. It was named one of the world’s 10 best automobile designs. Learn about the C-3 with photos.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Frank Kurtis made some of the earliest high-performance cars such as the well-received Sport a slab-sided two-seat convertible. Learn about Kurtis sport cars at HowStuffWorks.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide