Other Motorcycle Manufacturers

See photos and read histories about the Reading Standard, Vespa Allstate Cruisaire and Bimota Tesi motorcycles in this channel.

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The 1951 Vincent HRD Series B Rapide motorcycle was in its day among the world's fastest. A unique feature of this motorcycle is that the components were bolted to each other instead of the frame. See pictures and learn about the Vincent HRD Series.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The British-built 1961 Velocette Venom motorcycle was a 100-mph single-cylinder bike. The motorcycle was capable of reaching such high speeds because of the large 500-cc cylinder displacement. See pictures and learn about the Velocette Venom.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

Though a beautiful machine, the 1915 Iver Johnson motorcycle lacked horsepower. The motorcycle used a V-twin that displaced 1020 cc, which was far less than the other V-twins of the era. Find more information and view pictures of the 1915 Iver Johnson.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1964 Vespa Allstate Cruisaire was a U.S. version of the iconic Italian scooter. The frameless chassis housed a two-stroke engine that was efficient and perfect for city use. See pictures and learn about the Vespa Allstate Cruisaire.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1951 Whizzer Pacemaker was as much bike as motorcycle but played a big role in cycle history. The simple design gave everyone an opportunity to experience motorized transportation. See pictures and learn about the Whizzer Pacemaker.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1997 Ural motorcycle was essentially a reproduction based on parts from different BMW models. The styling if the Ural is crude but the motorcycle and sidecar could be purchased for a cheap price. See pictures and learn about the Ural motorcycle.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1914 Thor motorcycle was from a company noted mostly for building motorcycle engines. The 1914 Thor is the perfect example of what early motorcycle design looked like. See pictures and learn more about the 1914 Thor motorcycle.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1988 Laverda SFC 1000 motorcycle featured Laverda's trademark three-cylinder engine. This particular model was not intended for export sales so this motorcycle is very rare in the U.S. See pictures and learn more about the Laverda SFC 1000.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1904 Marsh motorcycle used parts made by the Marsh brothers themselves. It had a single cylinder engine that had an intake valve that opened on the cylinder's down stroke. See pictures and learn about the 1904 Marsh, a pioneering motorbike.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1961 Matchless G-12 motorcycle was one of the last models offered bearing the Matchless name. The 1961 model performed poorly which caused low sales against other British competitors Triumph and BSA. See pictures and learn about the Matchless G-12.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport motorcycle from Italy was low slung and sporty. The engine used shaft drive instead of a chain and had a front-mounted alternator which lowered the seat position. See pictures and learn about the 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1971 Munch TTS motorcycle is a rarity. Only 250 Munch bikes were made and under 50 came to the U.S. Built from a low-production company, it is often said that no two Munchs are exactly alike. See pictures and learn about the Munch TTS.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1974 MZ TS250 motorcycle had origins in Communist East Germany and was popular as basic transportation. It was powered by a 250-cc two-stroke single cylinder engine that was built for economy rather than speed. See pictures and learn about the MZ TS250.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1937 Nimbus Luxus motorcycle was produced in Denmark and had many unusual features. This motorcycle featured many unusual design elements such as a channel-steel frame and odd gear lever placement. See detailed pictures and learn about the 1937 Nimbus Luxus.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1970 Norton Commando 750S motorcycle was sporty but dogged by Japanese competition. The most interesting design element of this motorcycle is the high-set exhaust pipes with heat shields. See pictures and learn about the Norton Commando 750S.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1976 Norton Commando motorcycle was among the last bikes Norton produced. Outdated design elements caused Norton to slip in sales when compared to its Japanese competitors. See pictures and learn more about the classic Norton Commando.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1910 Pierce motorcycle was America's first four-cylinder motorcycle. The bike consisted of a heavy tubular frame that doubled as storage for fuel and oil. See pictures and learn more about the innovative 1910 Pierce motorcycle.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1913 Reading Standard motorcycle was a great example of an early American motorcycle. Reading Standards is best known as the first American motorcycle company to offer a flathead engine. See pictures and learn about the Reading Standard.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1914 Sears Deluxe motorcycle was offered for sale in the Sears and Roebuck catalog. The motorcycle featured a 35-cubic-inch Deluxe ''Big Five'' engine and sold for 197 dollars. See pictures and learn more about the Sears Deluxe.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1956 Simplex Automatic motorcycle was a lightweight machine that could return 100 mpg. The main reasons for the high fuel economy were the overall light weight and efficient design of the bike. See pictures and learn about the Simplex Automatic.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1940 Crocker motorcycle outperformed better-known bikes of its era. Manufactured in Los Angeles, California, from 1936 to 1940, only 61 Crocker V-twins were built. See pictures and find out what made the brawny 1940 Crocker so special.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1958 Cushman Eagle and Cushman Pacemaker motorcycles were great starter bikes for new motorcyclists. Cushman was also one of the few manufacturers of motorized vehicles permitted to continue civilian production during World War II. Learn about these scooters.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

The 1936 DKW SB 500 A motorcycle was a stout bike that looked back to racing success and ahead to battle duty. Fed by a Bing carburetor, the two-stroke engine produced 15 horsepower. Learn more about the DKW SB 500 A.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

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The 1965 DKW Hummel 155 motorcycle featured styling unlike any bike of its day. When the 1965 DKW Hummel 155 motorcycle was introduced to the public the European motoring press dubbed it the "Tin Banana." See what made it so unique in this article.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide

No question about it the 1996 Boss Hoss motorcycle is the biggest baddest bike to ever roam the streets. It defines 'bigger is better' by packing a Chevy V-8 engine. See pictures and learn about the outrageous Boss Hoss.

By the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide