Car Safety and Regulatory Devices

In the Safety & Regulatory Devices section you'll find tools and technology intended to keep drivers and passengers safe, from car seats and airbags to red-light camera technology.


It's freezing when you get into your car and you notice a light on your dashboard saying, 'check tire pressure.' You figure it's something to do with the cold, but must you fill up the tires fast?

Traffic hotspots costs drivers billions of dollars in wasted time. So what are cities doing to help alleviate them?

Although driving in inclement weather with your car's hazards flashing seems like a great idea, it might be both illegal and ill-advised.

Depending on where you live and what you drive, a car alarm can be worthwhile. Here's how to know.

You wouldn''t do that (right?) but we bet you've been behind people who switched lanes without a signal.

Nudging a thermostat, pushing an elevator button and pressing a crosswalk control are satisfying ways to control the environment around us… right? Right?

The carmaker has been talking about fatality-free vehicles for a decade. How's that going?

You watch somebody zip right through an obvious speed trap — but there are CDs all over the dash and the hubcaps are covered in foil. Is that car really ticket-proof?

So you've been pulled over by the police, and they've put a breathalyzer in your face. Your friends once said you could beat it by sticking a penny in your mouth. Does it really work?

We don't give them a second thought now, but when airbags were first introduced, they were controversial. But did they actually make cars less safe?

There's no doubt that airbags are one of the great achievements in automotive safety technology. But could they actually end up hurting or killing the people they're supposed to protect?

Seatbelts are a way of life for most of us, but some think it's safer to go without them. Could following the rules and wearing a seatbelt actually end up killing you?

Most safety and regulatory devices within your car or truck operate so seamlessly that you may never even know that they're active. So how do you know when your vehicle's traction control system is working?

Over the next few years, your commute just might get a lot more comfortable -- all in the name of safety, of course. Will Volvo's traffic jam assistance system really alleviate traffic jams?

Is your big, comfy luxury car lulling you to sleep while you drive? Is your tin-can econobox shaking the fillings out of your teeth as you get around town? Which one do you think is safer?

When you're driving, your eyes are on the road, your hands are busy steering the car, and your feet are making you stop and go. So what part of your body could still take in new information?

You may have noticed that one of the lights on your console is shaped like a tire with an exclamation point in the middle. This is a tire pressure monitoring system, which lets you know if your tires are underinflated.

Few of us will ever have to bail out of a fighter jet mid-flight; however, it's comforting to know that similar seatbelt technology will keep you anchored during a head-on car collision.

Every auto manufacturer approaches the problem of blind-spot detection in a slightly different manner. Some are high-tech and others are low-tech. Which do you prefer?

Head-up displays are much more than just a novelty or a new way of viewing navigation directions. In fact, HUDs could very well be one of the best safety systems your car has ever seen.

The LATCH system makes it easier to select and install a car seat. But there are still important choices for you to make -- and actions for you to take -- to ensure your child's safety.

That pesky hiding place near your car's rear fenders is known as the blind spot -- and yes, it's dangerous. But if you follow these mirror adjustment tips, it'll never bother you again.

You can probably guess what a speed limiter does by its name alone. But how do they actually work? And why would someone want to limit a car's top speed, anyway?

If you're old enough, you remember when people would walk around with neck braces as a form of whiplash treatment. But as automotive technology advances, whiplash may no longer be an issue.

It used to be easy to make your car go faster -- just step on the accelerator, and the throttle would manually open. Today, many cars use electronic throttle control. What does it take for sensors and computers to control a car's speed?

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