Auto Racing

Auto Racing includes information about different styles of racing and auto racing safety. Learn about auto racing on the Auto Racing Channel.

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Many stunt drivers have taken a car to the edge of destruction (or beyond) in the name of adventure and adrenaline-pumping thrills. We've collected a few of the scariest stunt car feats ever attempted.

By Christopher Neiger

There's a good chance you've never heard of tether car racing. That's because there are only a few remaining racetracks and a handful of enthusiasts left in the world. What makes this hobby so unique?

By Christopher Neiger

All forms of auto racing require some level of driver skill in order to remain competitive. But gymkhana isn't just a test of a driver's physical skills -- it's also a complex mental challenge.

By Eric Baxter

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The Isle of Man TT circuit has been the site of high-speed motorcycle races since 1907. But in 2009 a different type of motorcycle race tore through the narrow, winding streets: the TTXGP Grand Prix.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Evel Knievel was the motorcycle daredevil that motivated an entire generation of kids to jump their bicycles over anything and everything -- even when the odds were against a successful landing.

By Jamie Page Deaton

Becoming a NASCAR driver is about so much more than just going fast. To make it to the top of the NASCAR circuit, you have to be strong, smart and hardworking, too.

By Akweli Parker

Imagine an 8-foot tall, 8-foot wide, 12,000-pound diesel-powered truck hurling around the Nurburgring just inches from other trucks at 100 miles per hour. Sounds exciting, right? You bet it is.

By Eric Baxter

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Each year race cars become faster and safer. Can you imagine what they'll look like in the year 2025? A few designers took a shot at it recently.

By Jamie Page Deaton

Without a doubt, the Daytona 500 has the most unique qualifying format in the entire NASCAR season. What makes qualifying so unusual? How does a driver make it onto the starting grid for the race?

By Josh Briggs

Stock car racing was born in the days of Prohibition and has since exploded into the No. 1 spectator sport in the United States. How did Bill France make that all happen?

By Vivien Bullen

Scanners reveal the human element still very much at work in stock car racing. A good scanner lets you be a fly on the wall in your favorite driver's car. You tune to their radio frequency, and presto -- You can overhear all the conversations!

By Eleanor Duse

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Telemetry is the remote collection and measurement of data. It usually involves some sort of wireless broadcast. Of course, remote data collection is important in many fields -- defense, medicine, even agriculture.

By Eleanor Duse

If you've ever seen a race car take-flight during a race, then you know how quickly one can suddenly resemble a low-flying aircraft. How do race car drivers keep their wheels on the ground?

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

For anyone interested in becoming involved in NASCAR or racing, the United States Auto Club is the place to start. So what all does the organization do for the sport and how can you become a member?

By Simon Shadow

NASCAR's gentleman's agreement was an unwritten rule that governed the behavior of the drivers in NASCAR's top racing series for almost 30 years. So what happened to the rule? Are there no gentlemen in racing anymore?

By Ed Grabianowski

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If you live for long weekends spent at the track, submerged in the whine of the engines and the roar of the cars as they shoot by, then you may want to learn more about the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). What do they do?

By Simon Shadow

Aerodynamics is the study of how air moves, and it's a crucial element in stock car design. But it has changed car racing in ways some fans find infuriating.

Stock car drivers are the ones who get all the attention after a big win, but kudos also need to go to the team working behind the scenes on the car's suspension.

By Simon Shadow

Mike Wallace continued a family tradition when he entered his first NASCAR race in 1990 -- $17 million later, he's still going strong.

By Vivien Bullen

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Johnny Benson, also called "Mr. Smooth," was inspired to race by his father, Johnny Benson, Sr., who raced for several decades in the smaller leagues in the Midwest. It was there on those dirt tracks that Benson, Jr., got his first taste of racing.

By Rosalind Jackson

While many successful car corporations were experimenting with aerodynamics in the 1960s, the “aero war” itself usually refers to the two biggest companies, Ford and Chrysler. These corporations truly went head-to-head with each other to be the best.

By Vivien Bullen

Some of J.J Yeley's earliest memories are of traveling throughout the United States and spending his days in the grandstands bragging to the other kids that his father was a racer.

By Vivien Bullen

While many successful car corporations were experimenting with aerodynamics in the 1960s, the "aero war" itself usually refers to the two biggest companies, Ford and Chrysler.

By Vivien Bullen

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Ever hear the saying that the game of life is won by inches? That's certainly true in stock car racing, when -- despite vehicle speeds that can exceed 200 miles (330 k) per hour -- mere inches are all that separate the winners from the losers.

By Sarah Siddons

Imagine soaring down the road in your Chevy Impala SS, leaning heavy into the turns. You're nearing 200 mph now -- as fast as your car will go. Then, zoom, zoom, zoom! This is stock car racing, and you've just been lapped at the final flag.

By Olivia Page