1900-1920s Other Motorcycle Manufacturers

The 1900-1920s Other Motorcycle Manufacturers Channel features some of the earliest models around. See the first lineups from other motorcycle manufacturers.


Though a beautiful machine, the 1915 Iver Johnson motorcycle lacked horsepower. The motorcycle used a V-twin that displaced 1020 cc, which was far less than the other V-twins of the era. Find more information and view pictures of the 1915 Iver Johnson.

The 1914 Thor motorcycle was from a company noted mostly for building motorcycle engines. The 1914 Thor is the perfect example of what early motorcycle design looked like. See pictures and learn more about the 1914 Thor motorcycle.

The 1904 Marsh motorcycle used parts made by the Marsh brothers themselves. It had a single cylinder engine that had an intake valve that opened on the cylinder's down stroke. See pictures and learn about the 1904 Marsh, a pioneering motorbike.

The 1910 Pierce motorcycle was America's first four-cylinder motorcycle. The bike consisted of a heavy tubular frame that doubled as storage for fuel and oil. See pictures and learn more about the innovative 1910 Pierce motorcycle.

The 1918 Pope L-18 motorcycle boasted innovation and quality engineering but was Pope's last motorcycle. It had a 61-cubic-inch V-twin engine with overhead valves which were innovative for the time. See pictures and learn about the Pope L-18.

The 1913 Reading Standard motorcycle was a great example of an early American motorcycle. Reading Standards is best known as the first American motorcycle company to offer a flathead engine. See pictures and learn about the Reading Standard.

The 1914 Sears Deluxe motorcycle was offered for sale in the Sears and Roebuck catalog. The motorcycle featured a 35-cubic-inch Deluxe ''Big Five'' engine and sold for 197 dollars. See pictures and learn more about the Sears Deluxe.

The 1926 Cleveland motorcycle was the company's answer to buyers yearning for four-strokes. The result was a four-cylinder model that was not the most impressive performer. Find out why the Cleveland fizzled in this profile and see pictures.

The 1910 Emblem was a popular and affordable motorcycle, but the Emblem brand wasn't destined to last. Claiming "Class Power Speed & Satisfaction," Emblem had high hopes of achieving success in a crowded market. See pictures and learn about the 1910 Emblem.

The 1915 Emblem Twin motorcycle's 76.6-cubic-inch engine was unusually large for its day. It was a bold offering from a company struggling to remain afloat amongst fierce competition and the ravages of an economic recession. Learn more about the 1915 Emblem Twin.

The 1911 Excelsior motorcycle was a product of Schwinn better known for bicycles. As was common for the era, the single was driven by a wide leather belt with progress slowed by a rear coaster brake. Learn about the 1911 Excelsior motorcycle.

The 1913 Excelsior 7-C motorcycle was designed by the Schwinn Bicycle Company, which built motorcycles until 1931. Despite the added speed potential, the Excelsior still relied on a simple rear coaster brake. Check out pictures and a profile.

The 1911 Flying Merkel was considered one of the premier motorcycles of its day. But despite innovative models such as this one, the Merkel company would be out of business by 1916. Learn about the 1911 Flying Merkel.

The 1920 Ace motorcycle had a short life, but it was a powerful and durable bike. Production ceased in 1922 due to financial setbacks and the death of its creator in a motorcycle accident. Learn about the 1920 Ace.