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How a Top Fuel Dragster Works

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Author's Note: How a Top Fuel Dragster Works

When I started to research this article, I had to go to the beginning. I'd heard of nitromethane, of course (thanks mostly to repeated viewings of "The Fast and the Furious" films) but I didn't know it went by other names. The National Hot Rod Association site is a little outdated, but a nice guy in the marketing office was happy to provide me with some updated statistics. Attaining such a speed in a car is a little mind-blowing, to tell the truth, because of air resistance and traction and the laws of physics. I've gone about half that fast before, but I was falling through the sky with an as-yet-undeployed parachute on my back.

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Sources

  • Davis, Marlan. "What is Nitromethane, Anyway?" Hot Rod Magazine. March 27, 2013. (July 28, 2014) http://www.hotrod.com/feature_stories/hrdp_1304_what_is_nitromethane_anyway/
  • Klinger, Max. "Why are they called funny cars?" ESPN The Magazine. March 31, 2009. (July 30, 2014) http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=4029678
  • Lotz, Eric. Director, NHRA Field Marketing. Personal correspondence. July 31, 2014.
  • Mazlumian, Pablo. "Nerd's Eye View -- Inside 10,000 HP." MotoIQ. Dec. 22, 2013. (July 28, 2014) http://www.motoiq.com/MagazineArticles/ID/3099/Nerds-Eye-View--Inside-10000-horsepower.aspx
  • McGee, Ryan. "Motorsports: Why drag racing is the loudest sport on the planet." ESPN The Magazine. Nov. 5, 2010. (July 28, 2014) http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=5759488

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