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How to Remove Engine Deposits


Tools and Materials for Removing Engine Deposits
The tools you'll need depend on which area of the engine you're looking to remove the engine deposits from.
The tools you'll need depend on which area of the engine you're looking to remove the engine deposits from.
Dimitri Vervitsiotis/Getty Images

Removing engine deposits may involve nothing more than pouring an additive into your gas tank or it may involve manually cleaning some parts on your engine. The tools you'll need depend on which area of the engine you're looking to remove the engine deposits from.

Most of the time, an engine deposit additive can be used to clean out areas of the engine such as the fuel injector ports, intake valves and the combustion chamber. Fuel injector ports have an opening that's about the size of a human hair, so even a clog of only ten percent can induce stalling, engine hesitation or loss of power. Combustion chamber deposits can raise the octane requirement of the engine and even cause premature fuel detonation, both of which will cost you more money in gas. Intake valve deposits can cause hesitation and stalling. To take care of all of these internal deposits all you'll need is a bottle of engine deposit additive. Many of the additive formulas you'll find at an auto repair store will take care of several issues like cleaning the carburetor or fuel injector deposits and intake valve deposits all at the same time [Source: Paul].

Another area of the engine that you may want to clean the deposits from -- and you'll have to do it manually -- is the throttle body. For this cleaning you can get a simple throttle body spray or you can do a more thorough job with a tool like an Intake Snake or another similar product. You'll need tools to remove the intake air hose, emissions hoses and any other parts directly connected to the throttle body as well. You'll probably need screwdrivers and pliers to remove the hoses and clamps. And if you don't want to purchase a product like the Intake Snake, you can use a soft-bristled toothbrush and a mild cleaning solvent; however, even a tooth brush could cause some damage to sensors inside of the throttle body [source: Allen].

The reason a tool like the Intake Snake is better than a simple spray cleaner is that some aerosol cleaners may contain a formula that's a little too strong for the insides of your throttle body. But understand that cleaning with a toothbrush or other tools in your garage may be harmful to interior throttle body walls as well [source: Allen].

On the next page, find out how to properly clean the deposits from inside of the engine and from the throttle body without causing any damage.


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