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How long does it take to build a Ferrari?

        Auto | Exotic Cars

The Ferrari Assembly Process
A man takes photos of a Ferrari California at an auto exhibition in Beijing, China, in 2009. The five-day exhibition showcased imported cars, many of them high-priced luxury models.
A man takes photos of a Ferrari California at an auto exhibition in Beijing, China, in 2009. The five-day exhibition showcased imported cars, many of them high-priced luxury models.
AP Photo/Greg Baker

Part of the Ferrari mystique has to do with the brand's reputation for hand-crafted workmanship and attention to detail by tradesmen and women, not robots.

But actually, robots do have a role in the Ferrari-building process. You can find them in the engine shop, where they do most of the work in order to boost both productivity and quality. And you'll find robots in the almost completely mechanized paint shop, too. There, body shells receive an anti-corrosive treatment before being ministered to with automatic priming, painting and baking procedures.

A few buildings away, workers (wearing Ferrari red, of course) put together the various components by hand. Working in an assembly line style reminiscent of many factories, these employees install fully assembled drivetrains, seats, dashboards, convertible tops and other sub-assemblies [source: Yap].

At typical car and truck factories, when business is good it's common to have two or even three shifts working in order to keep pace with demand. At Ferrari, however, there's only one shift, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. And at 5 o'clock, there's no mad scramble to escape the building. Employees casually stroll out, apparently in no rush to leave the place that frequently lands on Europe's "best places to work" lists.

The car is almost complete. Find out the finishing touches and how long the entire process takes from beginning to end, on the next page.