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1989 Ferrari Mythos Concept Car


1989 Ferrari Mythos Concept Car Body Design
Without a roof or side windows, the 1989 Ferrari Mythos concept car was a roadster in the truest sense of the term.
Without a roof or side windows, the 1989 Ferrari Mythos concept car was a roadster in the truest sense of the term.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

The 1989 Ferrari Mythos concept car body design harked back to Ferrari tradition, but also forged its own path.

The 1989 Ferrari Mythos concept car body design symbolized a rebirth of the two-seater "barchetta." Pininfarina described it as "very compact, decidedly sporty and extremely spartan." Coupe, targa, and speedster bodies were considered, but speedster won out for its race-car connection. That meant neither a solid roof nor side windows had to be dealt with in the design process.

A low but lengthy windshield stretched out steeply, to flow into the projectile-like nose. Wheel arches hugged the tires, reaching down close to the pavement. Deeply recessed rectangular headlamps barely broke the flow of the fender, from air dam to door. A lower lip at the front end was "echoed" by a touch of bulge that extended all the way back along the lower body, level with the sills.

Monstrous intake holes behind the doors fed air into the greedy Boxer engine; however, there was no Testarossa-style grillework to block the flow. The Pininfarina signature and Ferrari crest sat just behind the rear intake, ahead of the back wheel.

A rear end that broadened sharply (but ever so gracefully) also rose above the seats, helping to accent the Ferrari Mythos concept car's wedge profile, whether viewed from the side or above.

Rear overhang appeared even shorter than a ruler suggested -- nearly nonexistent, in fact, going beyond stubby to deliver a sliced-off look. Two pairs of exhaust pipes peeked out from the engine-ventilation slit in the back panel, below the taillamp that was set and above the continuous bumper.

Aggression was evident in such details as the shape of the nose; the small windshield and squared-off tail (both reminiscent of certain Group C racing cars); the steeply-inclined outer edge of the air intake; and the raised front wheel arches, which were typical of Pininfarina-styled Ferraris.

An extension of the windshield glass hid its wiper. Because the Ferrari Mythos concept car's side planes blended so well, the big rear wing spoiler didn't stand out nearly as much as in other supercars.

To improve downforce, the rear wing spoiler of the Mythos could lift nearly 12 inches.
To improve downforce, the rear wing spoiler of the Mythos could lift nearly 12 inches.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Viewed from the top, a link with Formula 1 Ferraris was evident in the double "S" section, said to be "similar to the sinuous lines of a... violin." Whereas an ordinary Testarossa was wider at the rear than at the front, the Ferrari Mythos concept car added five more inches to that difference, making the back end 8.2 inches broader than the front. For that reason, the gaping rear air intakes were evident even when viewed from the front of the car. Rear overhang was shorter than Testarossa's, measuring just 25 inches.

The 1989 Ferrari Mythos concept car forged a new path not just in the design of its body. Learn more on the next page.

For more on concept cars and the production models they forecast, check out:


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