Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

1965-1968 Dodge Monaco and 500


The Style of the 1967 Dodge Monaco
The distinctive Dodge taillamp design became even more audacious for the 1967 Dodge Monaco. Vents below the backlight permitted flow-through interior ventilation.
The distinctive Dodge taillamp design became even more audacious for the 1967 Dodge Monaco. Vents below the backlight permitted flow-through interior ventilation.

The style of the 1967 Dodge Monaco was carefully conceived and something to behold. The delta taillights on the 1967 Dodge Monaco swelled into oversize flaring trapezoids above a notched bumper. It was the best iteration yet of the delta concept, with the big wedges giving a bold, brash look that was unmistakably Dodge. The area between the lamps' inner and outer bright bezels was painted sintered silver metallic on Polaras, taillight red on Monacos.

Uppers on the Dodge Monacos remained crisp and rectangular except on the new 1967 semi-fastback two-door hardtops. This design, conceived by Ed Westcott of the Chrysler Studio, sported a big triangular sail panel that flowed cleanly into the aft quarters. Dodge designers had struggled for years to achieve this integration of C-pillar and quarter panel, but they might just as well have retained the old design with the pillar perched atop the quarter.

The popular vinyl roofs of the day required bright finishing moldings that slashed across otherwise pristine surfaces, breaking up their continuity (At least the Pontiac stylists faced this same frustration.) The new hardtops also featured flow-through ventilation, identified by a painted air-exit grille in the upper deck panel just beneath the backlight.

Inside, the 1967 Dodge Monaco 500's hallmark wicker accents returned in the usual places, and a reclining passenger seat was a new option. The dashboard was evolved from the 1965-1966 design, with the twin gauge panels going from circles to rectangles. New wheel covers (designer Jeffrey Godshall's first such design) featured a black outer ring inset with bright radial louvers circling a raised cone with a fratzog center.

Engine choices for the 1967 Dodge Monacos remained the same except for a new Magnum 440 option. Equipped with enlarged intake ports and exhaust passages, longer duration camshaft, special valve springs with surge dampers, special four-barrel carbs, low-restriction exhaust manifolds, and a larger-diameter dual exhaust system, this "A-134" engine delivered 375 mighty horsepower. It was standard for the new Coronet R/T and optional for Dodge Chargers, Polaras, and Monacos.

Despite more aggressive styling and larger dimensions, big-Dodge volume declined for 1967. The Monaco 500 dipped to 5,237. Grand Prix, on the other hand, managed almost 43,000 sales, fortified by knock-'em-dead styling and the new ragtop.

Would the Dodge Monaco be back with a vengeance in 1968? Find out on the next page.

For more information on cars, see: