1962-1967 Chevrolet Chevy II


1962 Chevrolet Chevy II
At $2,003, the least costly 1962 Chevy II was the series 100 two-door sedan.
At $2,003, the least costly 1962 Chevy II was the series 100 two-door sedan.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Three trim levels were featured on the 1962 Chevrolet Chevy II. The low-priced 100 series was available as a two- or four-door sedan or a two-seat station wagon.

At $2,003, the four-cylinder, two-door sedan was priced $10 higher than Chevrolet's lowest-priced car, the Corvair 500 coupe, and $18 above the cheapest Falcon. Standard features on all models included heater and defroster, electric windshield wipers, foam-padded front seat, cigar lighter, and Magic-Mirror acrylic lacquer exterior paint.

Originally, there was to be a 200 series, but this was scrubbed at the last moment. What became the mid-range Chevy II 300 series included the two sedans, and -- unusual for this class -- a three-seat wagon with a rear-facing third seat.

Interiors in the 1962 Chevy II 100 series were basic yet attractive. This car doesn't even have a cigarette lighter!
Interiors in the 1962 Chevy II 100 series were basic yet attractive. This car doesn't even have a cigarette lighter!
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

The top-of-the-line Nova 400 came as a very good looking Sport Coupe two-door hardtop, convertible, two- and four-door sedan, and two-seat wagon. Exclusive-to-Nova features included uplevel interior and exterior trim, including full wheel discs, carpeting, and foam-cushioned rear seats. All-vinyl interiors were found in the wagon and convertible, and bucket seats were optional in the Sport Coupe and convertible.

Engineering was straightforward, but contemporary. An all-new structure, shared with no other GM car, featured integral body/frame construction, but with a separate front-end sub-frame.

Bolt-on, instead of welded-on, front fenders reduced repair costs, especially when compared with fully unitized cars like Corvair and Valiant. Front coil springs were as expected, but the real news was the novel five-foot-long "Mono-Plate" rear leaf springs -- tapered, single-leaf semi-elliptic units, made of high-strength rolled steel and mounted in rubber bushings.

They reduced unsprung weight a bit, cut manufacturing costs, and were said to be less susceptible to rust damage. Two-ply tubeless tires and 13-inch wheels were standard, mounting 6.00 × 13 or 6.50 × 13 tires depending on model.

A new family of inline engines was developed to power the Chevy II. The standard engine for the 100/300 series was a 153-cubic-inch inline four, Chevrolet's first "four-banger" since 1928.

Weighing in at just 2,410 pounds, the 1962 Chevy II came standard with a 90-horse ohv four displacing 153 cubic inches. That compared with the Ford Falcon's standard six with just 144 cid and 85 bhp.
Weighing in at just 2,410 pounds, the 1962 Chevy II came standard with a 90-horse ohv four displacing 153 cubic inches. That compared with the Ford Falcon's standard six with just 144 cid and 85 bhp.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Engineering features included a cast-iron block with a weight-saving thin-wall casting (like the Falcon), single-barrel carburetor, hydraulic valve lifters, and an 8.5:1 compression ratio. Horsepower, 90 at 4000 rpm, compared favorably with Falcon's 144-cubic-inch, 85-horsepower six.

A new 194-cubic-inch six, rated at 120 horsepower, was standard for Nova 400s, optional on the 100 and 300 (a 230-cid, 140-bhp version would make its debut in the full-size 1963 Chevrolet). Falcon's optional 170-cid six developed only 101 horses. Transmission choices were the usual three-speed, column-shift manual, with Chevy's two-speed Power-glide automatic optional.

How was the first Chevy II received? Find out on the next page.

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