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5 Ways to Recycle a Seatbelt


3
Hammocks
Seatbelt material that isn't strong enough to be used in cars is still sturdy enough to be used in hammocks, such as these Ting Slings.
Seatbelt material that isn't strong enough to be used in cars is still sturdy enough to be used in hammocks, such as these Ting Slings.
Courtesy of Ting

­Recycled seatbelts can also be woven into large sheets that can be used for hammocks. The hammocks are durable and manufactured by weaving the belts so that the hammock cradles the body more than conforms to it, as with traditional rope hammocks [source: Koerner].

Unfortunately, recycled material may be more difficult to come by in large enough quantities to make an entire hammock. Designers like Inghua Ting instead use end of the line material -- seatbelt material made specifically for vehicles no longer in production or that have been redesigned. They may also use rejected seatbelt material, set aside because of minor weaving flaws (the seat belt may be too weak to safely use in a vehicle, but still durable enough to hold you) or mismatched colors [source: Ting London].

This is definitely a more time-intensive and serious DIY project than most. Your best bet is to learn about weaving from a professional, as an improperly woven hammock is useless and potentially dangerous to boot. Plus, designing a hammock using woven seatbelt material requires more than a webbed flat surface, as the material is flexible enough to shift with weight on it [source: Ting London].


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