The 1973 model came with a five-mph front bumper, which added 130 pounds to the weight of the car.

The 1973 Lincoln Continental Mark IV

New models don't generally change much in their second year, but that was not the case with the 1973 Lincoln Continental Mark IV. Aside from restandarized opera windows, the most visible difference for 1973 was a new five-mph front bumper per federal edict.

This bulky spar added 130 pounds to weight and nothing to appearance, as it made for a stunted grille and a somewhat heavier look. Turn indicators were restyled to suit, and cornering lamps were newly standard.

Another sign of the times was another reduction in horsepower, now 208 net. A tighter 2.75:1 rear axle helped compensate.

Among other technical changes were more sound insulation, larger rear brakes, improved front disc brakes, bigger tires (230-15 Michelins or LR78-15s) and a side-terminal battery. Standard paints were cut to 15, but Moondust options went to nine, vinyl roof colors to eight.

Lincoln had lately profited from special trim options on the Continental, and the idea was extended to the Mark with a mid-1973 package, the Silver Luxury Group. Priced at $400, this comprised Silver Moondust paint, matching "Levant grain" vinyl top, and an interior done in Cranberry Victoria Velour.

Dark red leather upholstery was later added as a no-cost alternative. Also issued after the start of the model year was a Silver Mark that added silver leather seats and a pioneering sliding glass moonroof to the luxury group.

Though some felt the Mark IV hadn't changed for the better, the 1973 attracted 69,437 orders, nearly 8000 more than that year's Eldorados. It also contributed to Lincoln model-year production that exceeded 100,000 for the first time -- by a healthy 28,073 units.

To learn about the 1974-1975 Lincoln Continental Mark IVs, continue on to the next page.

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