1973-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle


In 1969, the marketing gurus were telling Detroit's "Big Three" that American consumers were getting in the mood to break loose and spend. Like its competitors, General Motors heeded the advice and planned accordingly, and one legacy is the 1973-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle.

Classic Cars Image Gallery

1969 Chevrolet
Sedan and coupe views from February 1969 provide
little hint of the "Colonnade" roof styles that would
characterize the new Chevelle. See more classic car pictures.

The launch of massive more-than-full-size models in all five GM car lines for 1971 was to be followed up with new intermediates for 1972 -- cars larger and more luxurious than their predecessors. No one could imagine how quickly this rosy scenario would become clouded.

A United Auto Workers strike against General Motors in mid-1970 cast the first long shadow over the product plans. The strike's impact pushed the launch of the new mid-size General Motors cars, including the Chevrolet Chevelle, back a full model year, to 1973. Distractions such as 1971's corporate switch to engines designed to run on low-lead fuels and emerging safety concerns also impacted development.

Then John Z. DeLorean, Chevrolet's dynamic general manager during the design phase of the new Chevelles, left just as they were being announced. He departed in late September 1972 to start a brief stint as vice president of General Motors's Car and Truck Group.

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Type S-3
The Laguna Type S-3 Chevelle bowed out after
9,100 of the 1976s were made.

DeLorean left the new Chevelle an important legacy, though. He and Alex Mair, then Chevrolet's chief engineer, championed great handling. Like many new Chevrolet models of the era, the new Chevelles would be exceptional drivers' cars.

The 1973-generation Chevelle shared its new Fisher A-body structure with the Oldsmobile Cutlass, Buick Century (a replacement for the Skylark), and Pontiac LeMans. The upscale Chevrolet Monte Carlo personal-luxury coupe, which had been introduced in 1970, was also based on the General Motors A-body and featured new styling for 1973.

Like the new Monte Carlo, the 1973 Chevelle featured a full perimeter frame, newly refined "Full Coil" suspension, and standard front disc brakes. These features not only improved ride and handling, but were three reasons Chevelle could claim it offered standard-sized features with mid-size value.

1977 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic station wagon
The 1977 Chevelle Malibu Classic station wagon
was the top hauler on the Chevelle roster.

The new Chevelles were 5.4 inches longer (6.5 for wagons), more than an inch wider, and a bit lower (except for wagons) than the 1972 models. The "Wide-Stance Chassis" had a wider tread, but the 116-inch wheelbase of earlier Chevelle sedans and wagons was carried over, as was the 112-inch wheelbase used on two-doors in the 1968-1972 period.

The A-bodies were all new inside and out. All models shared new "Colonnade" rooflines, which combined frameless hardtop-style door glass on all models with strong B-pillars that helped the new body structures meet federal rollover standards. Fixed rear quarter windows were used on the coupes, which had a semi-fastback roof line. Four-door sedans had six-window styling. Gone, however, were convertibles and true two- and four-door hardtops.

Learn more about the 1973 Chevrolet Chevelle's styling on the next page.

For more information on cars, see:

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Styling

The 1973 Chevrolet Chevelle styling was relatively clean. All the 1973 General Motors intermediates had dual headlights, but this was nothing new for the Chevelle, which had been running with twin lamps since 1971.

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu
The production 1973 Malibu emerged with a
conventional grille and a hefty front bumper.

A grille of stacked horizontal bars filled the space between each headlight. Large, round, quad tail lamps were found at the rear on coupes and sedans (mounted in the bumper on station wagons), another small touch carried over from the 1971-1972 models. Hidden windshield wipers and flush outside door handles were standard. An antenna embedded in the windshield was included with factory-installed radios.

Energy-absorbing hydraulic front bumper systems left an ungainly appearance on these vehicles and added more weight. Wagon styles included a new lightweight one-piece swing-up liftgate; swing-out rear-quarter vent windows were standard on three-seat models.

Chevrolet offered three full Chevelle series for 1973. A luxurious new Laguna range was the top line, meaning the Malibu was now pushed down to second rank. For the price-leader series, Chevrolet revived the Deluxe nameplate.

1973 Baldwin-Motion Phase III Chevelle
Baldwin Chevrolet, a New York dealership, along
with Motion Performance, created and sold this one
1973 Baldwin-Motion Phase III Chevelle for $12,030.

All three series were offered in the full array of body styles. There were Estate versions of the Laguna and Malibu wagons (with simulated wood side trim), and there was a surprising new station wagon option package we'll get to in a moment. (The new wagon's body and chassis also gave rise to an updated El Camino sedan pickup. GMC sold a variation of this car-based hauler called the Sprint.)

A 250-cubic-inch engine generating 100 net horsepower powered six-cylinder Chevelles, while a 307-cubic-inch engine was standard in most V-8 models. Three optional V-8s -- including a 245-horsepower Turbo-jet 454-cubic-inch V-8 with a four-barrel carburetor -- were offered. The big-block 454, introduced in 1970, previously had been available only in Chevelle Super Sports but was optional in any Chevelle for 1973.

The popular small-block 350-cubic-inch V-8 was offered in 145-horsepower two-barrel and 175-horsepower four-barrel versions. The two-pot 350 was standard in Lagunas. Valve rotators were now used in all V-8 engines.

Two four-speed transmissions were offered: a wide-ratio box with the 175-horsepower 350 V-8, and a close-ratio unit for the 454 when installed in the coupe models only. A special instrumentation package, with round gauges borrowed from the Monte Carlo, was offered only for V-8 coupes.

The SS model option made its final appearance on a Chevelle in 1973 (though it hung on for years on El Caminos). Not surprisingly, it was available for coupes, but that it was also available on the station wagon was a real shock.

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Super Sport
The Super Sport package was available as a
performance option package for the 1973 Malibu.

Malibu coupes and wagons received Super Sport treatment when regular production option Z15 was specified. A black-finished grille and special exterior accents, lower bodyside and wheel opening striping, prominent SS badging, and a Monte Carlo-style instrument panel were included. The SS coupe featured 14×7 rally wheels and fat G70-14 white-lettered tires, while Turbine I wheels and less-aggressive tires (and suspension components) were included with the SS wagon. A 350 or 454 V-8 was required.

The SS option listed for $249.50 extra on the wagon, which Chevrolet prophetically promised would be a one-of-a-kind vehicle. The rare one-year-only Super Sport wagon helped raise total Chevelle SS sales slightly; about 4,000 more were built in 1973 than in 1972.

See the next page to read about the new top-line 1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna models.

For more information on cars, see:

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Line

But the 1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna line was the big news for the year. With their resilient urethane integral front bumper/grille surround, distinctive diecast grid-pattern grille with built-in round park lamps, and faux wood accents inside, Lagunas presented not only a new look, but new luxury to the Chevelle buyer.

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna
The new 1973 Chevelle Laguna coupe was a
runaway popularity champ.

Uplevel options available for Lagunas (and certain other Chevelles) included new swiveling Strato-bucket front seats, a power Sky Roof retracting metal panel, and the urethane-faced Turbine I wheels from the SS station wagon package.

The Laguna was positioned to take on the upper end of the intermediate market, which in those dog-eat-dog days openly included the other GM intermediates. Outside the corporate domain, face-lifted Ford Torinos and restyled Plymouth Satellites were among the 1973 competitors.

In late 1973, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) drastically reduced the flow of imported oil to the U.S. This action triggered long lines and soaring prices for the limited supply of gasoline, and had an immediate impact on the new-car market. When the 1974 Chevelle line was released in September 1973, it may have been just as well that the SS package was gone.

The new sporting Chevelle for 1974 was the Laguna Type S-3, which combined Laguna luxury with the superior road manners of the SS. Handling was further enhanced with the addition of new GR70-15 radial-ply tires. The Type S-3 and all other Chevelles with available 70-series radials included radial-tuned suspension components.

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna interior
Swing-out bucket seats, introduced for 1973,
remained an option for the 1974 Laguna.

The 454-cubic-inch V-8, now rated at 235 horsepower, was again available in all models, and could still be had with a close-ratio four-speed (or automatic) transmission. It was not, however, available in California this year. The wide-ratio four-speed offered for the 350 V-8 was gone, however.

The 307 V-8 went away, but a new 400-cubic-inch small block V-8 option was offered with two-barrel carburetion everywhere but in California and a four-barrel carb for California only. The same carburetion restrictions applied to the 350 V-8. A new High-Energy Ignition system for the 400 and 454 V-8s became available mid-year.

Even with its still considerable torque, the big 454 did not make for an especially lively Chevelle. This was due in part to the car's sheer bulk. (An enthusiast magazine noted its 454-powered Type S-3 test car weighed more than 4,600 pounds.) The result was mid-16-second quarter-mile runs at around 87 mph-competitive for the era, but still disheartening.

Another new feature of the early-1970s automotive landscape was the federal Environmental Protection Agency's posting of fuel economy figures. The EPA city rating for the 1974 Chevelle 454 with a four-speed was 7.6 miles per gallon. Even the six-cylinder models were good for only about 16 miles per gallon.

For more on the 1974 Chevelle, continue to the next page.

For more information on cars, see:

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle

The model lineup was revised for the 1974 Chevrolet Chevelle. With the Deluxe axed, the Malibu became the base line, while the top full-line series was known as the Malibu Classic. All models were about three inches longer, due to new rear bumper designs. With the Laguna Type S-3 Colonnade Coupe becoming the sole Laguna model, the 1974 Chevelle line consisted of 12 models, down from 16 in 1973.

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Type S-3
The 1974 Laguna was down to a single coupe
model, the Type S-3.

The decision to offer the Laguna only as a coupe reflected the popularity of the General Motors intermediate coupe styles in 1973. The majority of 1973 Lagunas sold had been coupes, and coupe styles accounted for 60 percent of all Chevelle production for the model year. This ran counter to the seers' predictions, but no one cared; two-door Chevelles and other General Motors intermediate coupes were some of America's most popular cars, with the Oldsmobile Cutlass finding an especially warm reception in showrooms.

All 1974 Chevelles had new squarish one-piece taillamps, while a stand-up hood ornament, elongated Mercedes-type grille, and specific rear panel and lamp treatment helped provide touches of elegance for the plush Malibu Classic. A new Landau Coupe version, featuring a vinyl half-roof and special exterior features, was added to the Classic roster. Both the Malibu Classic coupe and Laguna Type S-3 featured small rear coach windows. Only the base Malibu two-door continued the larger quarter glass seen on all 1973 coupes.

On the Type S-3, rally wheels, sport mirrors, and lower body striping (similar to the 1973 SS) were included in the package, as were a sport suspension and variable-ratio power steering. The Laguna's pliable front fascia was continued, but the grille texture and inboard-mounted parking lights were revised. Both front and rear bumpers were now designed to survive five-mph crash tests with minimal damage.

The Type S-3 initially was built only in Antique White with a Dark Red vinyl roof, accents, and interior, a favored combination even after other trim combinations became available. Inside the Type S-3, Monte Carlo-type instrumentation with round gauges was standard. Around January 1, 1974, a Sports Roof option, which included louvered rear-quarter coach windows and a front-half vinyl roof cover, became available for the S-3.

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Type S-3
The Type S-3 combined the Laguna's high style
with the sportiness of the now-discontinued SS.

Then, in April, the car's base price was lowered almost $300 as the swivel bucket seats, sport mirrors, four-spoke sport steering wheel, and radial tires became optional. This move made the car more affordable for younger buyers who liked the Type S-3, but couldn't handle a pricetag in the $4,500 range.

The gas crisis may have helped Chevelles find buyers. As large and thirsty as they were, they were still somewhat more fuel efficient than the full-size 1974s. Still, skittish shoppers were taking a pass on Detroit's larger offerings and Chevelle production for 1974 was 362,483, a drop of more than 24,000 units from 1973, which saw the sales high-water mark for the third-generation Chevelles.

Continue to the next page to learn about the 1975 Chevrolet Chevelle.

For more information on cars, see:

1975 Chevrolet Chevelle

As the U.S. auto market continued shifting to smaller, more fuel-efficient cars for 1975, Chevrolet focused on its small-car models, including a restyled Nova, new Monza 2+2 and mid-year Monza Towne Coupe, plus the tangential Cosworth Vega twin-cam special. Though unchanged in basic dimensions, the 1975 Chevrolet Chevelle was no longer touted as "standard-sized;" it was now prudently marketed as the mid-size, mid-price Chevrolet. Still, production fell below 285,000 cars.

1975 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic Landau
A new grille, headlamp bezels, and taillights
graced the 1975 Chevelle Malibu Classic Landau.

The 454-cubic-inch V-8, downrated yet again to 215 horsepower, made it into 1975 as a Chevelle option, but this would be its last go-around in the Chevrolet intermediate. It was not available in California, or, curiously, in the Laguna Type S-3, and the optional four-speed stick was no longer offered. Meanwhile, the 250-cubic-inch six standard in Malibu and Malibu Classic coupes and sedans was extensively revamped and promised better fuel economy.

Additional fuel-saving measures were being pursued in places other than under the hood. The new Chevrolet Efficiency System included a federally mandated catalytic converter that helped Chevelles run smoother, cleaner, and, most importantly to buyers in 1975, more economically. (To guard against fouling the converter catalyst with leaded gasoline exhaust, the fuel filler neck was made narrower to accommodate the smaller nozzles of pumps that dispensed unleaded gas.)

A 2.56:1 "highway" axle ratio was available to improve V-8 gas mileage. Furthermore, buyers could now choose an Econominder instrument package that included a vacuum gauge to point out when optimum fuel economy was being attained. Coupes with V-8 engines could still be equipped with a tachometer and cars equipped with the tach or Econominder brought with them the round-gauge instrument cluster adapted from Monte Carlo.

New front and rear designs, with a distinct grille and simple rectangular tail-lamps, provided a fresh appearance for the 1975 Chevelle line. Dual remote mirrors, new twin sport mirrors, intermittent wipers, and cruise control were among new convenience features this year. Although the basic body styling was unaltered, the Colonnade designation was dropped.

1975 Chevelle interior
Despite being a mid-size car, the
1975 Chevelle sedan could seat six.

The Laguna Type S-3 was on hiatus at the beginning of the 1975 model year, but it would reappear at the Detroit Auto Show in January 1975. A new graphics treatment with striping and vinyl accents that contrasted vividly with the body color was available, but the Type S-3 could be ordered without striping for a clean and fresh new look.

Up front, a Camaro-inspired sloping frontal appearance gave the Type S-3 a genuinely sporty look. Inside, cloth or vinyl upholstery could be selected for the standard bench seat. Swivel buckets and a console were available at extra cost.

The Malibu Classic gained more elegance with a plusher interior and suspension upgrades that promised a quieter ride. Rally wheels were now available on all models, and radial-ply tires became standard on all Chevelles.

To follow the Chevelle story into 1976 and 1977, continue to the next page.

For more information on cars, see:

1976-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle

Engines for the 1976-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle included a new 140-horsepower 305-cubic-inch V-8, two- and four-barrel 350s (with availability still depending on California delivery), and the 400-cubic-inch V-8, still good for 175 horses. A three-speed manual transmission was standard with the carryover six, but all V-8s came with the turbo Hydra-matic autobox.

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic
Malibu Classics were gussied up in 1976 with their
own grille texture and stacked rectangular headlights.

The American bicentennial year was the last year for the Type S-3, which was little changed from 1975. NASCAR racers were discovering the slant-front Type S-3 had appreciable aerodynamic benefits and the car enjoyed some favor in the Chevrolet stock-car racing fraternity for several years.

Benny Parsons's badly wrecked Malibu limped home in 28th place in the last race of the 1973 season, but it was enough to help the tenacious underdog lock up the NASCAR crown. A combination of Chevelles and Monte Carlos won a dozen races in 1974; six in 1975; 13 in 1976; and a whopping 21 in 1977 (when Cale Yarborough won a second consecutive season points title while driving Chevrolets).

The Malibu Classic line stepped out with its own frontal appearance that featured rectangular stacked quad headlamps and a "chain-link" grille texture. Malibus retained dual round headlights and a simpler grille surface.

Chevelle demand rebounded to more than 333,000 cars for model-year 1976 and its popularity was almost as strong the following year. The 1977 Chevelles were little changed, except that the Type S-3, the Estate wagon, and the 400-cubic-inch V-8 were gone. The taillamp treatment was once again changed, with new segmented lenses in place of the less fussy 1976 design.

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic coupe
The 1976 Malibu Classic coupe started at $9,926
with a six and $4,455 with a V-8.

The 1977s were, however, historic vehicles in a most ironic sense. They shared Chevrolet showrooms with new full-size Impala and Caprice models, which had shed about 700 pounds. These newly svelte 116-inch-wheelbase Chevrolets were nearly the same size as their Chevelle stablemates and they looked much leaner.

Come 1978, it was the mid-size line's turn to be downsized. The Chevelle nameplate was dropped and the popular Malibu name was applied to the new 108.1-inch-wheelbase car that resulted.

Little changed in basic design during the five years they were built, the 1973-1977 Chevelles accounted for nearly 1.7 million sales in one of the most unsettling periods the automotive industry ever faced.

Surprisingly large and comfortable, surviving Chevelles of this era bring back great memories of how enjoyable a V-8-powered, rear-drive 1970s GM car could be. That is, if you can find a nice one. Pristine examples of the 28,647 1973 SS Chevelles or the approximately 38,000 Laguna Type S-3s built during 1974-1976, are difficult to find, which is a shame. Now that fuel is plentiful, and the 55-mph national speed limit has been consigned to history, this may be the best time ever to own one.

See the next page for models, prices, and production numbers for the 1973-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle.

For more information on cars, see:

1973-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle Models, Prices, Production

Conceived in optimism but born late, the Chevelles of the mid-1970s wound up being raised in trying circumstances. When these Chevrolet intermediates finally were retired, though, it had to be obvious to anyone who bothered to notice that there would never be cars quite like them again. Here are the specifications for the 1973-1977 Chevrolet Chevelle:

1977 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu coupe
The price-leading 1977 Chevelle Malibu coupe
drew 28,793 orders.

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Deluxe Models, Prices, Production

Deluxe (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,435$2,7195,253
4-door sedan, V-8
3,5852,83515,502
coupe, I-6
3,4232,7436,332
coupe, V-8
3,5802,86015,045
4-door wagon, 2S, I-6
3,8493,1061,870
4-door wagon, 2S, V-8
4,0063,1987,754
4-door wagon, 3S, V-8
4,0543,331 1,316
Total 1973 Chevelle Deluxe


53,072

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Models, Prices, Production

Malibu (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,477$2,8712,536
4-door sedan, V-8
3,6272,98758,143
coupe, I-6
3,4302,8943,157
coupe, V-8
3,5803,010165,627
4-door wagon, 2S
4,0273,29018,592
4-door wagon, 3S
4,0753,4235,961
Estate 4-door wagon, 2S
4,0323,4755,527
Estate 4-door wagon, 3S
4,0803,608 4,099
Total 1973 Chevelle Malibu


263,642*

1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Models, Prices, Production

Laguna (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan
3,6273,17913,095
coupe
3,6783,20342,941
4-door wagon, 2S
4,1103,4834,419
4-door wagon, 3S
4,1583,6162,200
Estate 4-door wagon, 2S
4,1413,6623,661
Estate 4-door wagon, 3S
4,1893,795 3,709
Total 1973 Chevelle Laguna


70,025
Total 1973 Chevelle


386,739

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Models, Prices, Production

Malibu (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,638$3,04911,399
4-door sedan, V-8
3,7883,34026,841
coupe, I-6
3,5733,05415,790
coupe, V-8
3,7233,34537,583
4-door wagon, 2S
4,1913,70112,408
4-door wagon, 3S
4,2233,8342,583
Total 1974 Chevelle Malibu


106,604

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic Models, Prices, Production

Malibu Classic (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,695$3,3044,457
4-door sedan, V-8
3,8453,59551,468
coupe, I-6
3,6093,3074,132
coupe, V-8
3,7593,598116,962
Landau coupe, I-6
--
3,518
351
Landau coupe, V-8
3,911
3,800
27,490
4-door wagon, 2S
4,2834,11813,986
4-door wagon, 3S
4,3154,2514,909
Estate 4-door wagon, 2S
4,306
4,291
5,480
Estate 4-door wagon, 3S
4,338
4,424
4,742
Total 1974 Chevelle Malibu Classic


233,977

1974 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Type S-3 Models, Prices, Production

Laguna Type S-3 (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,951
$3,723
21,902
Total 1974 Chevelle


362,483

1975 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Models, Prices, Production

Malibu (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,713$3,40212,873
4-door sedan, V-8
3,8333,65224,989
coupe, I-6
3,6423,40713,292
coupe, V-8
3,7623,65723,708
4-door wagon, 2S
4,2074,31811,600
4-door wagon, 3S
4,2374,4632,377
Total 1975 Chevelle Malibu


88,839

1975 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic Models, Prices, Production

Malibu Classic (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,778$3,6951
4-door sedan, V-8
3,8983,94551,070
coupe, I-6
3,6813,6984,330
coupe, V-8
3,8013,94876,607
Landau coupe, I-6
--
3,930
378
Landau coupe, V-8
3,903
4,180
22,691
4-door wagon, 2S
4,2754,55615,974
4-door wagon, 3S
4,3054,7016,394
Estate 4-door wagon, 2S
4,301
4,748
4,637
Estate 4-door wagon, 3S
4,331
4,893
4,600
Total 1975 Chevelle Malibu Classic


186,682

1975 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Type S-3 Models, Prices, Production

Laguna Type S-3 (wheelbase 112)
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,908
$4,113
7,788
Total 1975 Chevelle


283,309

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Models, Prices, Production

Malibu (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,729$3,67113,116
4-door sedan, V-8
3,8344,20125,353
coupe, I-6
3,6503,63612,616
coupe, V-8
3,7554,16617,976
4-door wagon, 2S
4,2384,54313,581
4-door wagon, 3S
4,2684,6862,984
Total 1976 Chevelle Malibu


85,626

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic Models, Prices, Production

Malibu Classic (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,827$4,1964,253
4-door sedan, V-8
3,9324,49073,307
coupe, I-6
3,6883,9265,791
coupe, V-8
3,7934,44576,843
Landau coupe, I-6 --
4,124
672
Landau coupe, V-8 --
4,640
29,496
4-door wagon, 2S
4,3004,77624,635
4-door wagon, 3S
4,3304,91911,617
Estate 4-door wagon, 2S4,326
4,971
5,518
Estate 4-door wagon, 3S4,356
5,114
6,386
Total 1976 Chevelle Malibu Classic


238,517

1976 Chevrolet Chevelle Laguna Type S-3 Models, Prices, Production

Laguna Type S-3
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,978
$4,621
9,100
Total 1976 Chevelle


333,243

1977 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Models, Prices, Production

Malibu (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,628$3,93539,064
4-door sedan, V-8
3,7374,055--
coupe, I-6
3,5513,88528,793
coupe, V-8
3,6504,005--
4-door wagon, 2S
4,1394,73418,023
4-door wagon, 3S
4,1694,8774,014
Total 1977 Chevelle Malibu


89,894

1977 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu Classic Models, Prices, Production

Malibu Classic (wheelbase 116; 2-door 112)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan, I-6
3,725$4,47576,776
4-door sedan, V-8
3,8244,595--
coupe, I-6
3,5994,12573,739
coupe, V-8
3,6984,245--
Landau coupe, I-6 --
4,353
37,215
Landau coupe, V-8 --
4,473
--
4-door wagon, 2S
4,2335,06531,539
4-door wagon, 3S
4,2635,20819,053
Total 1977 Chevelle Malibu Classic


238,322
Total 1977 Chevelle


328,216

* Includes 28,647 V-8 coupes and station wagons equipped with the Super Sport option package.

Sources: Encyclopedia of American Cars, by the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide, Publications International, Ltd., 1996; Chevrolet Motor Division; N.A.D.A. Classic, Collectible and Special Interest Car Appraisal Guide, January-April 1999.

For more information on cars, see: