1971-1976 Pontiac


The 1971-1976 Pontiacs were full-size cars affected by internal and external pressures on the auto industry.

As the 1960s wound down, Pontiac found itself at the end of a very successful era. Though the "Wide Track Division" had fought its way to third place in national sales for much of the departing decade, many difficult changes loomed and "business as usual" was no longer going to work.

Pontiac Image Gallery

The 1972 Pontiac epitomized the large cars in this era of Pontiac history.
The 1972 Pontiac epitomized the large cars in this era
 of Pontiac history. See more pictures of Pontiacs.

Pontiac's reputation as a performance-oriented carmaker, though hard-earned and well-deserved, was no longer the surefire path to sales success it had once been.

A new batch of government mandated emission regulations, pressure from consumer and safety advocacy groups, as well as the retaliation of the insurance companies toward high-performance cars cut into Pontiac sales. Sales of 1970 GTOs, for example, were less than half that of 1966, and Firebird sales were also suffering.

Seeing that sales were slipping from their 1968 high and sensing the increased competition from sister divisions, especially in the lower-priced segments, new general manager F. James McDonald instituted the addition of new decontented versions of existing models.

Vehicles like the LeMans-based T-37 and GT-37, which featured taxi cab-like interiors, dropped base prices, but they did nothing to help reinforce Pontiac's brand image. Further hurting Pontiac was its lack of a competitive small car. The introduction of the Chev­ro­let Nova-based Ventura II in 1971 did little to establish a presence in the increasingly important small-car market.

Despite the emerging market trends favoring cheaper and smaller cars, it was nonetheless true that Pontiac still drew more sales volume from its traditional full-sized cars than from any of its other model lines as the 1970s began.

The 1970 "standard" Pontiacs were facelifted updates of the 1969 models, but an all-new big-car series was waiting in the wings for 1971. It was based on a new B-body platform shared with Chev­rolet, Olds­mo­bile, and Buick. A new chassis was developed for this new generation of Pontiacs. As before, it was a perimeter design, though quite different in layout to fit the new body.

The front suspension was also new, and was actually shared with the second-generation Firebird released the previous February. It featured revised mounting points and improved geometry for cornering, ride, and handling enhancements.

Likewise, the rear suspension was also re-engineered to complement the new front end. Station wagons used leaf springs, while other models used a new four-link design with coil springs. Three wheelbases were offered. Catalinas featured a 123.5-inch wheelbase, the higher-end cars rode on a 126-inch platform, and station wagons stretched 127 inches between the wheel centers.

To learn more about the 1971 Pontiac, see the next page.

For more information about cars, see:

1971 Pontiac

The styling of the full-sized 1971 Pontiacs was based on the then-popular "fuselage" concept that sought to envelope occupants in isolated comfort. This trend was pioneered in 1969 by Chrysler Corporation for its four full-sized car lines. Unlike the Mopars, Pontiac's interpretation didn't use as high of a beltline, and it didn't have the same "rolling fortress" look.

The 1971 Pontiac was redesigned inside and out.
The 1971 Pontiac was redesigned inside and out.

Up front, the beaklike nose was dominated by a massive split-grille design with vertical center sections linked to low horizontal extensions that ran out below the quad headlamps to the edges of the car.

Thin horizontal bars filled these grille cavities, though the mid- and top-trim series sported vertical bars, too. The front bumper dipped in the center to give more depth to the protruding central grille sections. The hood was sculpted with a raised "ironing board" treatment and center rib, which tied in with the grille design.

The leading edges of the bladed front fenders were strictly vertical and further accentuated the massive look of the front end. As they flowed back, the fenders and doors really picked up the fuselage shape, which made for large, elongated, front and rear wheel wells. The bladed contour of the front fenders was reprised in the trailing edge of the rear quarters, albeit with a little bit of a forward cant.

The deck featured two rows of louvers that were air extractors for a new pressurized ventilation system found on a number of General Motors cars. The decklid extended down to the bumper, a good idea for easy trunk loading. However, the portion of the lid that made it all the way down was quite narrow, crowded as it was by big horizontal taillight lenses.

Interiors were also completely redesigned, the most notable difference being the new "cockpit" dash design. It was similar in layout to that of the personal-luxury Grand Prix hardtop coupe and curved before the driver like the control panel of a jet- fighter plane.

In terms of body style availability, the base Catalina was the only series that had all styles available: two-door hardtop and convertible, four-door sedan and hardtop, and six- and nine-passenger Safari station wagons.

All full-sized 1971 Pontiac station wagons featured GM's new "clamshell" tailgate. The power-operated rear window retracted into the roof, while the manual tailgate (power was optional) retracted into the floor. It was a very innovative system, but was quite complex and expensive to repair.

The increased competition from within the corporation had Pontiac product planners scrambling with new models to not only meet the challenge from out-of-house competitors like Dodge and Mercury, but also from other GM divisions. They also sought to close up perceived gaps between models in the Pontiac lineup.

Unfortunately, the strategy did little more than confuse buyers and water down the hard-earned equity that Pontiac's nameplates, especially the Bonneville, had generated over the years.

For an explanation of the different types of Pontiac models, see the next page.

For more information about cars, see:

Different Types of Pontiac

­Several different types of Pontiac cars comprised the company's lineup. The Catalina lineup was fleshed out with Brougham models available as two- and four-door hardtops and a four-door sedan. They featured modest upgrades including more-luxurious upholstery, Brougham scripts on the C-pillars, and deluxe wheel covers. Brougham starting prices topped those of comparable base Catalinas by a little more than $200.

The 1971 Pontiac was available in a number of different models.
The 1971 Pontiac was available in a number of
different models.

The Bonneville was next up the ladder, though it had been knocked down a bit in the pecking order. While it rode the premium 126-inch-wheelbase platform, it was no longer the top-of-the-line series. That honor would be reserved for the new Grand Ville, which replaced the Bon­neville Brougham. (The Executive series was also dropped for 1971.)

Bonne­villes came as two- and four-door hardtops, plus a four-door sedan. They were identified externally by wide full-length lower-body trim with a louvered detail just behind the front wheel opening.

The Grand Ville -- offered in convertible and two- and four-door hardtop styles -- represented a new philosophy at Pontiac that sought to "out-Bonneville" the Bonneville. Rather than work within the constraints of the nameplate and improve that model, it was determined that something above the Bon­neville would generate new interest in the segment and in Pontiac in general.

The Grand Ville was the closest that Pon­tiac would ever get to having GM's prestigious C-body return to its lineup. The last time the division had such a car was the 1940-1941 Custom Torpedo. While the Grand Ville was based on the same "B" bodyshell as the Catalina and Bonneville, it featured a formal hardtop roofline borrowed from the new C-body Cadillac, Buick Electra, and Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight. This hybrid gave Pontiac a premium series without unmanageable costs.

A little bit of shuffling also went on with regard to the upper-level wagons. There were no Bonneville or Grand Ville station wagons as such. Rather, there was the Grand Safari, which used Bonneville base powertrains Grand Ville trim items. (Pontiac's model numbering system put the Grand Safari among Bonne­villes in 1971-1972 and 1975-1976, but with the Grand Villes in 1973-1974.) Simulated wood­grain trim was optional on all wagons.

Speaking of powertrains, some significant revisions to the entire Pontiac V-8 engine family were instituted for the 1971 model year. Like all other General Motors makes, Pontiac lowered engine compression across the board for compliance with the 1970 Clean Air Act, as well as compatibility with the new generation of low-lead and unleaded fuels. The 350-, 400-, and 455-cid V-8s all returned, though with less horsepower. Combined with the heavier curb weights of the new cars, performance suffered.

The standard engine for base Catalinas was a two-barrel-carbureted 350. With a 3.88-inch bore, 3.75-inch stroke, and a compression ratio of 8.0:1, it was rated at 250 bhp at 4,400 rpm and 350 pound-feet of torque at 2,400 rpm.

Catalina Safaris and Broughams came standard with a two-barrel 400, which was available as an option for the other Catalinas. With a 4.12-inch bore, 3.75-inch stroke, and 8.2:1 squeeze, it made 265 bhp at 4,400 rpm, with 400 pound-feet of torque at 2,400 revs. An optional four-barrel version of the 400 provided an extra 35 horsepower.

Bonnevilles received a 455-cube engine as standard equipment. Though based on the same basic block design, the 455 featured a 4.15-inch bore, 4.21-inch stroke, and 3.25-inch main journal diameters. Equipped with a two-pot carb, the 8.2:1-compression-ratio V-8 developed 280 bhp at 4,400 rpm and 455 pound-feet of torque at 2,000. Smooth and flexible with an abundance of torque, this engine was ideally suited to the big Pontiacs. It was also available in Catalinas at extra cost.

The Grand Ville received the four-barrel version of the 455 (an available option for all other full-sized models). It was good for 325 bhp at 4,400 rpm and 455 pound-feet of torque at 3,200 rpm.

An interesting side note from the 1971 model year was the early availability of a manual transmission. Though very slow-selling, considering the excellent reputation of the available Turbo Hydra-Matic automatic, there were some full-sized Pontiacs built with a synchromesh three-speed, which was considered standard equipment.

Factory records indicate 144 Catalina coupes and sedans, 30 Catalina wagons, six Broughams, four Bonne­villes, and a pair of Grand Villes were assembled with manuals, oddities to be sure. The window for ordering a stick-shift B-body Pontiac closed in March 1971, never to return. The Turbo Hydra-Matic then became standard equipment, a change that was accompanied by an increase in base prices.

Production of the 1971 B-body Pontiacs came to 261,282 cars. That was a notable drop from 1970, but a strike early in the model year slowed up production of General Motors vehicles. Thus, as a group, the full-sizers remained the most popular Pontiacs.

Continue on to the next page to learn about the 1972 Pontiac.

For more information about cars, see:

1972 Pontiac

The 1972 Pontiac full-sized models received only minor changes. A revised frontal design featured larger turn-signal lamps built into the fender caps. The "classic" grille lost its horizontal extensions and both headlight pairs were grouped in shared bright bezels instead of being mounted independently of each other, as in 1971.

The 1972 Pontiac posted impressive sales gains over the previous model year.
The 1972 Pontiac posted impressive sales gains
over the previous model year.

Grille bars on Bonnevilles and Grand Villes now had a prominent vertical pattern over subtler horizontal bars. Bonnevilles gave up the louver pattern on their rocker trim. A heavier-looking bumper with a black rub strip was also added, anticipating the upcoming federal bumper regulations. The rear bumpers also received the rub strips.

A change in the ventilation system did away with the decklid/tailgate louvers. Beyond this and some updated paint and interior appointments, things stayed largely as they were the year before.

One area of significance under the hood was in the way horsepower was measured. Beginning with the 1972 model year, all General Motors divisions began rating engine output using the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) net method.

Power was measured at the transmission tailshaft with all power accessories installed and with factory air-cleaners and exhaust systems. The SAE net figures were more representative of the power levels that the engines were actually generating when installed in the chassis. The truth is, there was not any significant difference in power output or performance between the 1971 and 1972 Pontiacs.

The 350 was rerated from 250 to 160 bhp (175 with dual exhaust) at 4,400. The 400 two-barrel went from 265 to 175 (200 with dual exhaust) at 4,000 rpm; and the four-barrel version, previously rated at 300 horses, received a net rating of 200 at 4,000 rpm (250 with duals).

Among 455s, the two-barrel went from 280 to 185 at 4,000 rpm (200 with duals). The four-barrel variant was still the top dog of the Pontiac B-car lineup, though it was now rated at 220 bhp at 3,600 rpm; dual exhaust upped that rating to 250.

The 1971-1972 full-sized General Motors cars were the subjects of a recall that involved the steering system. It had been determined by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration that stones or other small debris could become trapped in the steering-shaft coupling, causing a possible loss of steering control. Shields were added to the recalled cars. A redesign of the coupling alleviated the problem in time for the 1973 model year.

Production tallies for 1972 jumped by 31 percent, surpassing 342,000. With 228,262 assemblies, Catalina production alone almost matched total 1971 full-size Pontiac demand. Bonneville and, especially, Grand Ville experienced gains, too.

To learn about the 1973 Pontiac, see the next page.

For more information about cars, see:

1973 Pontiac

The 1973 Pontiac model year represented the beginning of significant changes to the entire full-size line. Many of these changes were made to comply with ever-increasing federal emissions and safety regulations.

The 1975 Pontiac featured greater fuel efficiency.
The 1975 Pontiac featured greater fuel efficiency.

In the interest of simplifying the product line, the Catalina convertible and the entire Catalina Brougham series were dropped. Also, all nonwagon B-body Pontiacs now rode on a common 124-inch wheelbase. (Station wagons retained their 127-inch stretch.)

A new front-end design was characterized by a truly massive energy-absorbing bumper that jutted from the new full-width grille. As before, the Catalina received a horizontal grille-bar pattern, while the other series used an "eggcrate" design.

Grand Ville hardtops and convertibles now came with standard rear fender skirts. Taillight designs were also redone again, with the Grand Ville having an ensemble that was different from the other lines.

More changes were also made under the hood to meet more-stringent emissions standards. All Pontiac V-8s received a new generation of emission-control devices, including an "exhaust gas recirculation" system, which reduced production of oxides of nitrogen by injecting a small amount of exhaust gas back into the cylinder to cut down combustion tem­perature.

All engines returned for 1973 with the exception of the 455 two-barrel, though most lost some power in the process. The twin-pot 400-cid engine became the new standard Bonneville powerplant.

The 1973 Bonneville hardtop coupe was the first B-body Pontiac to offer an optional "Radial Tuned Suspen­sion" (RTS) package. In addition to radial tires, the RTS package included stiffer springs and shocks to improve the handling capabilities of the full-size chassis.

Riding a record sales year for the industry at large, Pontiac had its best year ever in 1973. Total model-year production for the division hit 919,872 -- a gain of 281,000 from the year before.

The full-size line contributed 32,089 to that increase as production of Catalinas, Bon­nevilles, and Grand Villes neared 375,000 units. There would be no chance for a repeat, though.

That October, just weeks after the 1974s went on sale, the outbreak of war in the Middle East spurred an oil embargo by Arab producer nations. With gasoline supplies pinched for months, Ameri­cans' traditional taste for big V-8-powered family cars soured -- as did a national economy that had relied on cheap energy. The next couple of years would be brutal on Detroit.

For more on the 1974 Pontiac, see the next page.

For more information about cars, see:

1974 Pontiac

­The push to meet federal rollover-crash standards meant more changes for 1974 Pontiac. Catalina and Bonneville two-door hardtops received a new "colonnade" roof with large rear-quarter windows. The design essentially gave the cars a B-pillar, though small roll-down windows just aft of the doors remained for a true pillarless look.

Sales levels dropped for the 1974 Pontiac.
Sales levels dropped for the 1974 Pontiac.

New front styling included a return to a central radiator -- a design with definite Mercedes-Benz overtones. A strip of parking-lamp/turn-signal lens filled the gap between the bumper and headlight bezels. With new, more damage-resistant bumpers in back, the license plate holder was moved up into the rear fascia, filling an area that had previously been part of the trunk opening.

The 350-cid engine was dropped from the full-size line, leaving the 400 two-barrel as the base engine for the Catalina and Bonneville. The 455 four-barrel was standard in the Grand Ville (with dual exhaust as an option). The big engine could be ordered in Catalinas and Bonne­villes, as could the four-barrel version of the 400.

With just a few six-cylinder models to offer suddenly mpg-conscious car buyers, production of 1974 Pontiacs tumbled to around 560,000 cars. The full-size range felt the pain worse than some of the others: With 175,766 built, it sheared off nearly 200,000 units from 1973 -- and things would get worse before they would get better.

Continue on to the next page to learn about the 1975 Pontiac.

For more information about cars, see:

1975 Pontiac

The 1975 Pontiac model year proved to be significant for a few reasons. It marked the addition of catalytic converters in most models to further reduce exhaust emissions. The addition of these new devices required the use of unleaded fuel to prevent damage to their internal components.

The 1975 Pontiac was the last year for the full-size convertible.
The 1975 Pontiac was the last year for the
full-size convertible.

Also, the convertible body style made its last stand at Pontiac -- for a decade, at least. With a declining market for droptops having gradually reduced their numbers in America, a business case for the convertible could no longer be made.

Additionally, the Bonneville four-door sedan and Catalina four-door hardtop were dropped from the lineup. Also, Radial Tuned Suspension became standard on all full-sized models.

New rooflines were instituted through­out. Bonneville and Grand Ville Brougham (a new name) coupes received large fixed quarter windows and B-posts that went all the way to the door glass, while four-door hardtops added small "opera windows" in their rear pillars. A fixed-position vent window added more glass area in the rear doors of Catalina sedans.

Rectangular quad headlamps, a new trend for upper-level GM cars, were found on Bonnevilles and Grand Villes, which also shared a revised grille and taillamps that newly wrapped around the fender edges. A new six-element grille graced the front of Catalinas. Wheel­base for all models but wagons was nudged back to 123.4 inches.

Due to tighter emissions regulations, powertrain offerings got a bit confusing. The 400 with twin-throat carb was still the base powerplant for nonwagon Cata­linas and Bonnevilles sold everywhere but California. The 400 four-barrel came standard in all California-bound Cata­linas and Bonne­villes, "49-state" station wagons, and all Grand Villes. The 455 was standard for all wagons sold in California and was optional in all full-sized models. The compression ratio of all engines was scaled back to 7.6:1.

To learn about the 1976 Pontiac models, continue on to the next page.

For more information about cars, see:

1976 Pontiac

The 1976 Pontiac model year -- Pontiac's golden anniversary -- would be the end of the line for both the super-sized B-bodies and the 455-cid V-8. For this last year before drastically downsized 1977 models arrived, Pontiac again shuffled things around in an attempt to increase sales.

Appearance-wise, little had changed. With the freshening up the line received the year before and the new car waiting in the wings, there was little point to making any major changes.

Perhaps the most significant change was the retirement of the Grand Ville name. At some point, Pontiac's marketing and product planners must have realized that the equity built up in the Bonneville over the years was being squandered on an unproven nameplate that, in the end, wasn't getting the job done.

The solution was to bring the Bonneville Brougham moniker off the bench and put it on the top-level B-body Pontiac. Slightly modified grille designs were employed across the line, and Catalinas could be ordered with a Custom package that included rectangular headlights, additional exterior trim, and interior upgrades. Powertrain options were essentially the same as the previous year.

Total Pontiac output was up by more than 200,000 cars for the model year as the U.S. economy began improving and consumers were getting over their fuel-price jitters. Orders for full-sized Pontiacs, which had fallen off to 126,555 in 1975, bounced back to 137,216 units in 1976. However, that wasn't enough to keep the B-body cars from being overtaken -- easily -- by the series of Grand Prix personal coupes.

While the 1971-1976 full-sized Pontiacs were stylish and luxurious machines, they were really not the right cars for the time. They were larger, heavier, more complex, and more expensive to produce than the cars they replaced.

In an age when fuel economy and low operating costs were becoming more important, GM introduced the largest, costliest, and thirstiest machines in its history. It also didn't have a sufficiently adequate presence in the compact and subcompact markets.

Plus, GM was saddled with a corporate structure that allowed product-line changes only in concert with other divisions. That slowed down progress and made it harder to time new products to meet changing market conditions. The result was a loss of market share to foreign competitors, a trend that has yet to reverse itself.

To get more information about the 1971-1976 Pontiacs, including models, prices, and production, see the next page.

For more information about cars, see:

1971-1976 Pontiac Models, Prices, Production

The 1971-1976 Pontiac models marked the end of the full-size gas-guzzling era. They had all the style of their day, but in the end were made obsolete by tightening federal fuel standards and skyrocketing gas prices. Here are the specifications of the 1971-1976 Pontiac:

The 1975 Pontiac boasted major changes, but it wasn't enough to save the big cars.
The 1975 Pontiac boasted major changes,
but it wasn't enough to save the big cars.

1971 Pontiac Catalina Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
123.5 127.0

1971 Pontiac Catalina Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Safari 4-door wagon, 2S
4,8154,31510,332
Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
4,9054,4629,283
hardtop sedan
4,1073,93922,333
hardtop coupe
4,0423,87046,257
convertible coupe
4,0814,1562,036
4-door sedan
4,0773,77059,355
Brougham hardtop sedan
4,1794,1549,001
Brougham hardtop coupe
4,1194,0848,823
Brougham 4-door sedan
4,1494,0006,069
Total 1971 Catalina


173,489

1971 Pontiac Bonneville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
126.0 127.0

1971 Pontiac Bonneville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,8434,6433,613
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 3S 4,913 4,790 5,972
hardtop sedan 4,273 4,340 16,393
hardtop coupe 4,188 4,272 8,778
4-door sedan
4,2134,2106,513
Total 1971 Bonneville


41,269

1971 Pontiac Grand Ville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wheelbase, inches
126.0

1971 Pontiac Grand Ville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
hardtop coupe 4,2234,49714,017
hardtop sedan
4,3034,56630,524
convertible coupe 4,266 4,706 1,789
chassis
----194
Total 1971 Grand Ville


46,524
Total 1971 Pontiac


261,282

1972 Pontiac Catalina Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
123.5 127.0

1972 Pontiac Catalina Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,7434,23214,536
Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
4,8184,37212,766
hardtop sedan
4,1793,87428,010
hardtop coupe
4,1293,80860,233
convertible coupe 4,204 4,080 2,399
4-door sedan 4,154 3,713 83,004
Brougham hardtop sedan 4,238 4,062 8,762
Brougham hardtop coupe
4,1583,99610,545
Brougham 4-door sedan
4,1883,9168,007
Total 1972 Catalina


228,262

1972 Pontiac Bonneville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
126.0 127.0

1972 Pontiac Bonneville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,918
4,5815,675
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 3S 4,938 4,721 8,540
hardtop sedan 4,338 4,293 15,806
hardtop coupe 4,238 4,228 10,568
4-door sedan
4,288
4,169 9,704
Total 1972 Bonneville


50,293

1972 Pontiac Grand Ville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wheelbase, inches
126.0

1972 Pontiac Grand Ville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
hardtop coupe 4,262
4,44219,852
hardtop sedan
4,378
4,50741,346
convertible coupe 4,333 4,640 2,213
chassis
----320
Total 1972 Grand Ville


63,731
Total 1972 Pontiac


342,286

1973 Pontiac Catalina Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
124.0 127.0

1973 Pontiac Catalina Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,791
4,31115,762
Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
4,873
4,45714,654
hardtop sedan
4,270
3,93831,663
hardtop coupe
4,190
3,86974,394
4-door sedan 4,234 3,770 100,592
Total 1973 Catalina


237,065

1973 Pontiac Bonneville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wheelbase, inches
124.0

1973 Pontiac Bonneville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
hardtop sedan 4,369 4,292 17,202
hardtop coupe 4,292 4,225 13,866
4-door sedan
4,333 4,163 15,830
Total 1973 Bonneville


46,898

1973 Pontiac Grand Ville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
124.0 127.0

1973 Pontiac Grand Ville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,823
4,6746,894
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
4,925 4,82110,776
hardtop coupe
4,321 4,52423,963
hardtop sedan
4,376 4,59244,092
convertible coupe 4,339 4,766 4,447
chassis
--
--
240
Total 1973 Grand Ville


90,412
Total 1973 Pontiac


374,375

1974 Pontiac Catalina Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
124.0 127.0

1974 Pontiac Catalina Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,973 4,6925,662
Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
5,037 4,8346,486
hardtop sedan
4,352 4,34711,769
hardtop coupe
4,279 4,27840,657
4-door sedan 4,294 4,190 46,025
Total 1974 Catalina


110,599

1974 Pontiac Bonneville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wheelbase, inches
124.0

1974 Pontiac Bonneville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
hardtop sedan 4,444 4,639 6,151
hardtop coupe 4,356 4,572 7,639
4-door sedan
4,384 4,510 6,770
Total 1974 Bonneville


20,560

1974 Pontiac Grand Ville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
124.0 127.0

1974 Pontiac Grand Ville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 5,011 5,0992,894
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
5,112 5,2565,255
hardtop coupe
4,432 4,87111,631
hardtop sedan
4,515 4,93921,714
convertible coupe 4,476 5,113 3,000
chassis
--
--
113
Total 1974 Grand Ville


44,607
Total 1974 Pontiac


175,766

1975 Pontiac Catalina Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
123.4 127.0

1975 Pontiac Catalina Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,933 5,1493,964
Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
5,000 5,2954,992
hardtop coupe
4,334 4,70021,644
4-door sedan 4,347 4,612 40,398
Total 1975 Catalina


70,998

1975 Pontiac Bonneville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
123.4 127.0

1975 Pontiac Bonneville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 2S5,035
5,4332,568
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 3S5,090
5,5804,752
hardtop sedan 4,503 5,153 12,641
coupe 4,370 5,085 7,854
Total 1975 Bonneville


27,815

1975 Pontiac Grand Ville Brougham Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wheelbase, inches
123.4

1975 Pontiac Grand Ville Brougham Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
coupe
4,404 5,7297,477
hardtop sedan
4,558 5,89615,686
convertible coupe 4,520 5,858 4,519
chassis
--
--
60
Total 1975 Grand Ville Brougham


27,742
Total 1975 Pontiac


126,555

1976 Pontiac Catalina Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
123.4 127.0

1976 Pontiac Catalina Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 4,944 5,3244,735
Safari 4-door wagon, 3S
5,000 5,4735,513
hardtop coupe
4,256 4,84415,262
4-door sedan 4,276 4,767 47,235
Total 1976 Catalina


72,745

1976 Pontiac Bonneville Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wagon
Wheelbase, inches
123.4 127.0

1976 Pontiac Bonneville Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 2S 5,035 5,746 3,462
Grand Safari 4-door wagon, 3S 5,091 5,895 6,176
hardtop sedan 4,460 5,312 14,942
coupe 4,308 5,246 9,189
Total 1976 Bonneville


33,769

1976 Pontiac Bonneville Brougham Vehicle Specifications

Vehicle Specifications
Sedan
Wheelbase, inches
123.4

1976 Pontiac Bonneville Brougham Models, Prices, and Production

ModelWeight, pounds
Price
Production
coupe
4,341 5,73410,466
hardtop sedan
4,514 5,90620,236
Total 1976 Bonneville Brougham


30,702
Total 1976 Pontiac


137,216

Sources: Encylopedia of American Cars, by the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide®, Publications Inter­national, Ltd., 2002; 75 Years of Pontiac-Oakland, by John Gunnell, Crestline Publishing Co., 1982.

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