1969-1973 Plymouth


The full-size Plymouth in the 1960s faced some turbulence. Right off, it entered the decade facing a new, popular, and unwelcome internal rival, the Dodge Dart.

Plymouth Image Gallery

Plymouth designers sought to create a low but thick
Plymouth designers sought to create a low but thick
"armored car" appearance for their 1969-1973 line.
See more pictures of Plymouths.

Next, it suffered an ill-considered downsizing in 1962 when the wheelbase was chopped back to 116-inches, a mistake not rectified until 1965, when the wheelbase was enlarged to 119 inches. But by the time Plymouths got to be full-size again, the automotive landscape had changed radically.

Internal turmoil and subsequent restructuring within Chrysler had the dubious effect of making Plymouth and Dodge equivalent makes, leaving the two divisions to fight over roughly the same price and size segments of the market.

Thus, in addition to traditional rivals Ford and Chevrolet, Plymouth ended up competing with Dodge as well, not to mention an aggressive, split-grille, Wide Track Pontiac that rudely ousted Plymouth from its traditional number-three position in industry sales.

Expensive but successful restylings of the larger Plymouth in 1965, and again in 1967, helped Plymouth to secure a solid hold on fourth place in industry sales, thanks in part to Elwood Engel, Chrysler's vice president of styling.

Recruited from Ford in the fall of 1961, Engel had moved quickly to purge the company's cars of their unique but out-of-the-mainstream styling favored by the departed Virgil Exner. Vestigial fins and sculptural Valiant-like styling was replaced with the rectangular, "fill the box to the corners" automotive design favored by Engel. Fortunately for Chrysler, Engel's instincts proved correct; by 1967, the corporation was commanding a nearly 19-percent share of the automotive market.

The 1969 models gave Engel his third chance since 1965 to oversee the redesign of the corporation's full-size cars. Out of a tooling budget of $180 million for all four of the large "C-body" cars, $61 million was allotted to the big Fury.

Plymouth Fury designers hoped to continue the 1965-1968 vertical headlights for 1969, as seen on this February 24, 1966, mockup.
Plymouth designers hoped to use vertical headlights
for 1969, as seen on this February 24, 1966 mockup.

­Replacing the previous straight-edge design was a new more rounded look called "fuselage" styling, a construction in which the cross-car section of the body was said to resemble a similar section cut through the fuselage of a jetliner. The effect was further enhanced by increasing the curvature of the side glass.

Compared with 1965-1968, belt lines were raised, resulting in taller body-sides below the belt and narrower windows above. The new Plymouths had a much more massive look, but the cars were in fact bigger, riding on a one-inch longer wheelbase of 120 inches and, at 214.5 inches, adding 1.5 inches of overall length. Suburban station wagons retained their 122-inch platform, but grew up to 3.1 inches overall. Width grew as well, from 78 to 79.6 inches.

Plymouth's interpretation of Chrysler's corporate "fuselage" styling theme presented many challenges to designers. At the same time, product planners were wrestling with how to properly work levels of performance and luxury into cars for a changing market.

For more on the 1969 Plymouth's styling, continue on to the next page.

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1969 Plymouth Styling

While all the sheetmetal was entirely new and unique to Plymouth, it is difficult to describe the new 1969 Plymouth styling. It was almost as if Plymouth had designed a car without a theme.

The bumper design on this 1969 Plymouth model was intended to be more substantial.
The bumper design on this 1969 Plymouth model
was intended to be more substantial.

The 1969 Plymouth emerged as one of those "insurance company ad" cars. You know, a car so nondescript that it could have been used in a State Farm advertisement in The Saturday Evening Post without anyone's guessing the make.

When you analyze the bodyside of the 1969 Plymouths, there's nothing there. An utterly mundane horizontal fender and door merge into a rear quarter panel having an almost imperceptible swelling along its top surface. A third of the way down the bodyside, a horizontal break line runs straight front to rear, with a similar offset crease line at bumper height lower on the body.

Yet the Plymouth designers had something in mind. In a styling sketch of the 1969 Fury, the car was drawn so it looked hunkered-down on its wheels, as if it were tied down for shipment on a car carrier. This exaggerated the thickness of the bodyside, as did the shallowness of the side windows and the diminutive roof perched above the belt.

This was the essence of the "look" the Plymouth designers were striving for -- a mammoth, protective, almost armored car in its visual weight, looking as if it were silently slinking along just inches above the roadway.

What emerged in sheetmetal, however, was something less. Bland and colorless seem to be the adjectives that describe the 1969 Plymouths. (This blandness also engulfed the redesigned big Dodge as well.)

The Fury's bland appearance was most assuredly not due to any lack of talent among the Plymouth stylists. Plymouth exterior styling was headed by Gerry Thorley, who reported to Chrysler-Plymouth design executive Dick Macadam. "Mac," as he was known, was to become styling vice-president in 1974 after Engel's retirement in 1972.

This 1969 Plymouth model wears horizontal lamps to accommodate the bigger bumper.
This 1969 Plymouth model wears horizontal lamps
to accommodate the bigger bumper.

On the firing line was former Chrysler design executive Dick Clayton. Clayton was then manger of C-body styling in the Plymouth Exterior Studio and would oversee the styling of all big Plymouths from the 1968 to 1972 model years. It was under his direction that the 1969 Fury was developed.

Clayton readily admits that the 1969 Fury was not the car he wanted. Theme development was long and difficult. For example, resolving the lower character line in the bodyside proved particularly onerous until one day John Herlitz said, "Run it back and fade it out."

When Clayton realized that the 1969 wouldn't ever be all that he wished it to be, he concentrated on saving the bodyside for use on the 1970 he hoped to do. This, itself, was a risky bit of business. The stylists were also hampered by the threat of looming federal regulations regarding bumper impact standards.

"We wanted to do the 1970 in 1969," he recalls. Indeed, early shots of the clays show a loop front bumper with stacked headlights, the over/under lamps evolving the look of the 1965-1968 cars. Instead, he got ordinary horizontal lamps and a "chrome log."

Bumpers were comprised of a simple section drawn across the width of the car, virtually flat in plan view. Product Planning executive Harry Chesebrough dictated this after being grilled by a Congressional committee during a trip to Washington.

Stung by criticism of easily damaged, non-protective bumpers, Chesebrough stormed into the styling studios upon his return demanding flat, protective bumper planes front and rear. Unfortunately, this assured that the 1969 Plymouth (and Dodge) were virtual boxes in plan view. Plymouth's distinctive four-year-old vertical dual headlights were jettisoned in favor of more easily protected horizontal lamps.

At first, the stylists attempted to reprise the the 1968 grille, with its relatively narrow horizontal opening and body-color panel between the opening and the bumper. While the metal panel looked solid, it was actually perforated to admit air to the radiator.

Photos of clays for the 1969 illustrate two variations on this theme, the most distinctive being a "barbell" design in which a thin, car-wide opening was interrupted by rectangular shapes framing each headlight.

The surface above the barbell was hood; the undercut surface below body-color perforated metal. But what made it to production was a much less inventive wall-to-wall horizontal aluminum grille, the center texture of which resembled a Speidel watchband.

"It was really bad," Clayton admits. "We struggled with that grille until finally Mac said, 'You guys are out of time -- just do it!' But the Sport Fury/VIP diecast grilles were OK. We pushed for them so they'd be in the budget for the 1970 car, when we hoped to do a better job." Thus Sport Fury and VIP models boasted more expensive diecast grilles with an eggcrate texture and veed in plan view.

Rears were similar to the fronts, having rectangular taillights in a horizontal band immediately above the bumper -- two lamps on the Fury I and II, four on the Fury III, Sport Fury, and VIP lines. The hood and deck lid were flat, with both head and taillights having the appearance of being tucked up under a low forehead, adding to the massive look.

This was in sharp contrast to the elaborate loop bumpers on 1969 Chevrolets and Pontiacs, especially the latter's exaggerated, Endura-covered center prow.

Later in the model year, when the big Plymouths weren't selling as well as hoped, the front end ironically came in for much internal criticism. "Fixes" were initiated mid-year to add more substance, more interest, more something.

For more on the 1969 Plymouth, continue on to the next page.

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1969 Plymouth

In a clearly desperate move to increase the amount of visible bright-work on the 1969 Plymouth, blackout paint was removed from the not-meant-to-be-seen short vertical bars tying the aluminum grille's textured midsection to its upper and lower elements. On Sport Furys and VIPs, black paint was applied to parts of the headlamp doors and grille shelf to add visual contrast.

The most popular of all 1969 Plymouths was the Fury III four-door sedan, with 72,747 orders.
The most popular of all 1969 Plymouths was the
Fury III four-door sedan, with 72,747 orders.

Bright surround moldings were added to the leading edge of the hood and fender end caps on some models. With Plymouth sales falling from fourth to sixth place, behind not only Chevrolet, Ford, and Pontiac, but also Buick and Oldsmobile, the sales guys were in a mood to try anything.

Body-side trim was predictable: no molding on the Fury I; a slim, bright, full-length molding on the Fury II; and a wider molding plus bright front and rear wheel lip trim on the Fury III. The body-side moldings appeared to wrap all the way around the car, something Clayton pushed for.

The most tasteful trim graced the Sport Fury, where bright accents were restricted to the wheel openings and sill. Dual paint striping extended along the top of the fender and door and onto the rear quarter, trailed by red, white, and blue paint-filled bars. Yet, to Clayton, the Sport Fury trim represented still another disappointment.

"We wanted to offer [rear fender] skirts on the Sport Fury. But the cost guys wouldn't give us the money to tool a small part on the leading edge of the skirt necessary to visually bridge the gap between the narrow bright wheel lip and the wide sill molding. So, no skirts."

Clayton did like the graphically different black-center wheel covers styled by Fred Schimmelpfen and used on the 1969-1970 Furys.

Top-of-the-line VIPs had the most heavy-handed trim, employing a wide, bright-edged molding with a black vinyl texture insert along the body's lower character line, complete with bright front wheel lip molding and built-in cornering lights just behind the bumper.

If you ordered your VIP with a vinyl top, the molding insert was color-keyed to the roof, as was a similar textured insert between the taillights. Fender skirts, optional on most other Plymouths, were standard on the VIP, adding to its visual heaviness. On all lines, a rectangular series nameplate was recessed into the front fender.

To learn about the options offered with the 1969 Plymouth line, continue on to the next page.

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1969 Plymouth Options

The 1969 Plymouth options were plentiful, starting at the top. During 1967 and 1968, Fury two-door hardtops boasted two distinctive rooflines. One employed a thin C-pillar resembling a slanted parallelogram; the other, the "Fast Top," sported a wider triangular C-pillar.

The 1969 Plymouth Fury III four-door hardtop did well in the marketplace, selling 68,818 units.
The 1969 Plymouth Fury III four-door hardtop did
well in the marketplace, selling 68,818 units.

In the 1969 Fury III, Sport Fury, and VIP lines, a choice of two-door hardtops was again offered: "regular" or "formal." The formal hardtop, adapted from the Fury I and II two-door pillared coupe, had a C-pillar whose crisp trailing edge was coupled with a concave backlight.

This roof and backlight was essentially the roof used on the four-door sedans and hardtops, which meant that they, too, had the "formal" look. By contrast, the C-pillar of the regular hardtop had a smoother, more rounded appearance coupled with a convex backlight.

Fury III and Sport Fury formal hardtops were priced $20 more than the regular hardtops, while VIP buyers could have their choice at no increase in price. These formal hardtops didn't arrive until January, indicating a late decision on the part of Plymouth planners. Perhaps they shouldn't have bothered -- given the choice, most buyers opted for the regular roofline.

If you ordered any Fury III, Sport Fury, or VIP two-door hardtop with Airtemp air conditioning, the front vent windows were eliminated, adding to visibility and giving a cleaner look.

Abetting this austere appearance, all big Plymouths boasted concealed windshield wipers, parked unobtrusively in a gap between the hood and windshield. This attribute was a direct result of Pontiac's pioneering this feature beginning with its 1967 models.

Designers at Ford and Chrysler were somewhat in awe of the big Pontiacs during the 1960s, and once we "saw" the hidden wipers, we had to have them (at a cost of about $7.85 per car), too.

Ironically, the best-looking big Plymouths in 1969 were the station wagons, available in Suburban, Custom Suburban, and Sport Suburban guises. Unlike other body types, the Suburbans' rear wheels were fully exposed, visually lightening the rear quarters.

Furthermore, the roofs, with their long rectangular quarter windows, were also lighter looking. One new touch was the design of the D-pillar, which wrapped up and over the roof plane, acting to deflect the air downward past the tailgate window, keeping the glass free of dust.

Also new to Plymouth's big wagons was a two-way tailgate, lowering like a conventional tailgate or opening like a door. Sport Suburbans were easily identified by the simulated wood paneling on their long flanks. Due to their unique styling, Suburban taillights were always different from the other passenger cars.

The engine lineup was identical to 1968, with the hardy 225-cid Slant Six reserved for Fury I, II, and III sedans and two-door hardtops, and the base Suburban. As can be imagined, with this 145-bhp engine in these big cars, performance was marginal.

The standard V-8 was Chrysler's trusty workhorse of 318 cubes, with a 383-cid V-8 offered in 290-bhp (Commando) and 330-bhp (Super Commando) versions. A 375-horsepower, 440-cid Super Commando V-8 was optional on all models except the Suburbans, where a 350-horse 440 Commando V-8 was substituted.

Also available was the Turnpike Cruising Package consisting of a two-barrel 383 V-8 with speed control, power front disc brakes, a 2.76:1 economy axle ratio, undercoating, and a signal to warn of turned-on headlights. Prices ranged from $2,701 for a six-cylinder Fury I coupe to $3,718 for a three-seat Sport Suburban.

Following a long-established marketing practice, a variety of mid-year packages were introduced to stimulate sales, including Fury III, Sport Fury, and VIP "Specials," plus additional "A" and "B" equipment packages on the Fury III.

One of the rarest of the midyear 1969 Plymouths was a surreal "spring special" based on the Fury III two-door hardtop. The expected extras like deluxe interior, deluxe wheel covers, whitewalls, etc. were included, but the name was something else.

The Plymouth Snapper was billed as "the sleek, stylish, limited edition cousin of the Road Runner." Body color was gold, and the exclusive turtle-shell vinyl roof sported a camp Snapper name on a turtle image on the C-pillar.

Bizarre? You bet. Who would name a car after a turtle? In newspaper ads, the Snapper was illustrated in the larger-than-life cartoon style reserved for the Road Runner. Did some sales wizard hope part of the Runner's hip image might rub off on the big Plymouths?

Perhaps even more rare were the efforts of a Toledo, Ohio, dealer who apparently "did his own thing," advertising a "1969 1/2 Plymouth Diplomat" priced at $2,445, which appeared to be a Fury pillared coupe with Sport Fury ornamentation. It is these dealer initiatives and/or regional models that are the most difficult for automotive historians to discover and document.

In reminiscing about the first of the "fuselage Furys," Clayton was philosophical about the studio's effort, saying, "In the end, we had to write off the 1969 and hope to make good on the 1970."

Yet, his assessment wasn't shared by the buying public as Fury production (including a couple Canada-only models) rose to 370,035, some 17,000 cars more than in 1968. Moreover, the 1969 proved to be the most popular version of the five-year run through 1973.

Despite their bland beginnings, these big Plymouths actually got better looking and more stylish throughout the life of the basic body shell. Considering that face-lifts usually have the reverse effect, this was no mean feat.

Continue on to the next page to read about some of the improved features of the 1970 Plymouth.

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1970 Plymouth

After such a large and expensive effort the year before, the 1970 Plymouth was merely face-lifted. Yet the changes made a striking difference. To the betterment of the entire car, fronts and rears received the most attention.

The 1970 Sport Fury S/23 was the big Plymouth's 'starter' muscle car.
The 1970 Sport Fury S/23 was the big
Plymouth's 'starter' muscle car.

In place of the board-straight front end of 1969, the 1970 Plymouths sported a new loop-style front bumper with tall ends that jutted ahead of the hood, creating a pleasing and different plan view.

Styled by Neil Walling -- then a beginning co-op student, but destined to become vice-president for design -- the bumper's plan view resembled the arc of a bow.

"Elwood wanted a peak line [a sharp break] in the center," Clayton remembers. "He'd come in to the studio and draw a center line peak in the clay, but I didn't want to do it. So we didn't. Eventually, he gave up asking."

The stacked lamps originally preferred for the 1969 weren't considered, says Clayton, because the bumper standards ruled them out. Basically, since the height required for vertical headlights would have resulted in weaker-than-desired bumper ends, the headlights had to remain horizontal. Faced with this reality, the studio came up with something better -- it hid the lamps.

On Sport Fury and Sport Suburban models, headlights were concealed behind a recessed, blacked-out grille texture, accented by an offset red, white, and blue medallion. Amazing -- hidden headlamps on a Plymouth!

Clayton admits he and Macadam pushed hard for the look the studio wanted, but obviously someone must have loosened the divisional purse strings. Of course, competitive pressures helped. Pontiac added concealed lamps on the Grand Prix for 1967-1968, as did Chevrolet on its 1969 Caprice, as did Mercury on the 1969 and beyond Marquis/Marauder lines. Even Ford jumped aboard with its 1968-1970 LTD and XL.

Of course, the real competition came from Dodge, which had introduced hidden headlamps on the 1966 Charger. If the Dodge boys over the wall could come up with the money for hidden lamps, why not Plymouth?

Clayton attributes much of the success in upgrading the 1970 Plymouths to a man he still characterizes as "the world's greatest product planner," Gordon Cherry. The close rapport between Clayton and Cherry would soon pay even bigger dividends.

Whatever the cost, the loop bumper and disappearing lamps together made a truly handsome ensemble. Even the exposed lamps on lesser Furys looked good, tucked inside the loop bumper in a field of bright horizontal grille bars.

Out back, the rear was also given a loop bumper complete with integral horizontal taillights. Both front and rear bumpers seemed to "float" between the hood (or deck lid) and the body color valence panels below. The loop bumpers and hidden lamps went a long way toward giving the big Plymouths the look to which the stylists originally aspired.

Hoods sported muscular, parallel bulges while a color-keyed, vinyl-filled molding was added to Fury III and Sport Fury bodysides. In another small styling victory, the deck lid's key-lock cylinder was moved to an off-center location over the right-side taillight and tucked inside a rectangular series medallion.

Clayton was jubilant. "I raged against the 'belly buttons,' as I called the exposed, center-mount key cylinders. And Mac endorsed the offset idea because it might encourage owners to access the trunk from the [safer] curb side."

To learn more about the 1970 Plymouth lineup, continue on to the next page.

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1970 Plymouth Lineup

Missing from the 1970 Plymouth lineup were the VIP models, which had debuted in 1966. In their place was a larger selection of Sport Furys. In addition to the regular and formal two-door hardtops, four-door sedan and four-door hardtop models appeared for the first time under the Sport Fury banner.

Replacing the VIP was the well-appointed Brougham package, optional (at $152.75) on all Sport Furys save the regular two-door hardtop. On four-door models, a split bench seat with individual center armrests was featured, while on two-door cars, individual front seats were separated by a narrow center section and folding armrest. Both types featured a reclining front passenger seat. A discreet Brougham script on the C-pillars identified the upscale option.

Also absent was the Sport Fury ragtop. In 1970, Plymouth offered its big convertible solely in the Fury III series, assembling a mere 1,952 units. These few cars marked the end of the full-size Plymouth convertibles.

Two of the more interesting Sport Furys were two-door hardtops. Top of the line was the Sport Fury GT, a luxury car with high-performance equipment. Plymouth called it "nothing less than our biggest shell, wrapped around our biggest displacement engine. We don't call it Daddy Longlegs for nothing."

A 440 engine with a single Carter four-pot carb was included in the $3,898 sticker price; a 390-bhp 440 with triple Holley two-barrels was listed as optional. With its powerful engines, the GT was considered part of Plymouth's Rapid Transit System, a boastful, boisterous lineup of muscle cars that also included the new Duster 340, Road Runner and high-winged Superbird, GT, and the Barracuda ponycar.

Heavy-duty torsion bars, rear springs, shocks, and brakes were standard on the GT, as were extra-wide H70×15 tires fitted to handsome rallye wheels accented with deep, brushed aluminum trim rings. Plymouth billed the Sport Fury GT as "the ultimate sleeper. A real Q-ship." Clayton had other ideas.

"We asked ourselves, 'What is the use of the Fury GT in the Plymouth lineup?' We decided it was a big, powerful, American car with great road-holding qualities. Why not call it the American Express'?

"So we asked Jack Smith [who had successfully negotiated with Warner Brothers to obtain the rights to use the Road Runner name] to talk with American Express. Not only did they say no, they didn't even want to touch the idea." Too bad; it would have made a great "with it" name.

"We were searching for a distinctive style for the GT letters," said Clayton, "One day another stylist and I were idly looking out the window of the Plymouth Studio when a Grand Trunk railroad train passed by our Highland Park campus. Spotting the train's bold 'GT' letters, I said laughing to my companion, 'That's it!'"

Lunching off the GT was the Sport Fury S/23, which, according to Clayton, "was strictly a Product Planning idea. The studio did nothing on it." Like the GT, the S/23 boasted U-shaped stripes in white, black, or burnt orange tracing the twin bulges in the hood. Running around the car from front fender tip across the deck lid to the opposite fender was a reflective strobe stripe -- another pickup from the GT signage for both sports models appeared on the the deck lid and on each fender at the beginning of the strobe stripe.

The biggest difference between the two hardtops was under the hood. The S/23 was more show than go, with a 318 V-8 standard and two versions of the 383 optional. Production of both variants was lumped into the model-year total of 8018 regular Sport Fury two-door hardtops, but some sources claim 666 with GT equipment and 689 S/23s.

To learn about the 1970 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe, continue to the next page.

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1970 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe

What was perhaps the most distinctive big model, the 1970 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe, was announced in late December. The idea for the Gran Coupe came in part from product planner Gordon Cherry and from Clayton's own personal lease car, a 1969 440 V-8 Fury II coupe, black with a black interior and black vinyl roof, which he fitted with inverted chrome wheels and special tires.

"The car got a lot of attention anywhere I took it," Clayton remembers. "I told Gordon about it and then gave him the car for a weekend. He had the same experience. ... He came back Monday morning saying, 'Maybe you have something here.' That essentially sold Gordon, then he sold the idea for the Gran Coupe."

Based off the Fury II fixed-pillar coupe, the Gran Coupe was equipped with many luxury cues that belied its humble origins. These included the Sport Fury grille and hidden headlamps, vinyl roof in standard colors or new paisley-patterned texture, vinyl-insert bodyside molding, wheel-lip moldings, deluxe wheel covers, and white sidewall tires.

Other equipment included a two-barrel 383 V-8, TorqueFlite automatic transmission, power steering and brakes, plus other assorted convenience and interior features. Though other combinations were available, the feature color was walnut, with a matching paisley vinyl roof and interior. In this guise, the car looked impressive and "dressy."

In its "A" package version (with air conditioning and tinted glass), the Gran Coupe, at $4,216, became the most expensive big Plymouth of the year, stickering at $318 more than the Fury GT. Even its $3,833 "B" package variant (minus air and tinted glass) was more costly than all but the GT. Yet advertisements claimed the Gran Coupe cost $233 less than a comparable Ford LTD, $348 less than a Chevrolet Caprice.

Here was a mid-year model that in some ways was as unlikely as the 1969 Snapper. Considering that the Gran Coupe had a low-line base, yet was simultaneously the highest-priced full-sized Plymouth, the profit margin must have been phenomenal.

Production totals were buried amid the Fury II coupe stats, but some idea of the popularity of the Gran Coupe can be ascertained by noting that assemblies of Fury II coupes shot up from 3,268 units in 1969 to 21,316 cars in 1970 -- even while overall demand for big Plymouths was going down.

The expensive alterations to the 1970 Fury were remedial in that they were designed to "fix up" a design no one was particularly happy with. Yet their improved appearance unfortunately did not result in increased sales.

Assemblies dropped to 265,955 cars, a substantial decline of more than 100,000 units compared to 1969. However, largely because of the hot new Duster, overall sales increased, enabling Plymouth to capture the coveted third-place position it had not held since 1960.

To follow the Plymouth models into 1971, continue on to the next page.

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1971 Plymouth

Although the original product plan had called for major sheetmetal changes to the back end, this money was reassigned to help pay for tooling the 1971 Plymouth's all-new mid-size. Consequently, changes to that year's big Plymouths were minimal.

Just 375 of the final 1971 Plymouth GTs were built.
Just 375 of the final 1971 Plymouth GTs were built.

Up front, on exposed headlamp cars, was a new aluminum mesh grille, deeply veed and finely textured in section, bisected horizontally by a narrow slotted opening. A Fury nameplate on a red background was set into the lower plane adjacent to the left-side headlamps. This was a smart workout, especially compared to the flat grille plane of the previous year.

Disappearing headlamp jobs also received new grillework. Graphically much busier, the grille texture was composed of eight horizontal rectangles, each filled with short, vertical bars. The flat, vertical grille plane was moved forward to the lip of the loop bumper for a much more "in-your-face" look than the recessed grille of the previous year.

Thorley, in pushing for the hidden lamps for the 1970 model, cited safety, reasoning that hiding the lamps protected them from dirt. Now, in 1971, you could order power-operated washers ($29.30) tucked behind the headlamp doors that would scrub the outboard headlights with small nylon brushes -- but only with the lights on. Hoods were new once again, this time with a simple center windsplit.

Out back was a new rear bumper. This was surprising in that it was an unusual place to spend money in a minor face-lift year. The license plate was mounted in the center of the bumper and flanked once again by horizontal taillights -- simple rectangles on Fury I and II; longer, more elaborate lamps on Fury III and Sport Fury.

In either case, backup lamps were incorporated within the taillight lenses. Additionally, to guard against dents and scratches, Sport Furys sported urethane rear-bumper appliqués color-keyed to the vinyl body side molding and optional boar-grain vinyl roof.

Several models were cut from the Fury lineup. The convertible was history, but compensating sunroofs were added as optional on any two-door "regular" hardtop. The pillared coupe was dropped, so the Fury II two-door became a full-fledged hardtop while the Fury I adopted the same roofline, but with fixed rear-quarter windows.

Gone, too, was the S/23. Appearing for the last time was the Sport Fury GT, nicely outfitted with attractive, full-length hood striping that encompassed outsized GT outline letters near the base of the windshield, plus smaller versions on the rear quarter panels.

Other neat touches included three rectangular diecast "outlets" mounted inboard on the front fender tops, with turn-signal indicators incorporated into the forward rectangle. Only the four-barrel 440 V-8 engine was available. Priced at $4,111 and in production for less than half the model year, a mere 375 were built.

The return of the successful Gran Coupe was announced in late November 1970, about a month and a half after the introduction of the rest of the Fury line. Though based this time on the Fury III, the formula was the same, employing the Sport Fury hidden-headlamp grille and a host of luxury accessories.

Two equipment packages were offered, again primarily delineated by the presence of air conditioning. Furthermore, buyers now had a choice of body styles: the formal two-door hardtop or -- despite the incongruity of the Gran Coupe name -- a four-door hardtop.

Hoping that lightning would strike twice, Plymouth planners in January added a similar special model based on the Fury I called the Fury Custom. Kind of a poor man's Gran Coupe, it was available in coupe and four-door sedan versions.

Offered with either a 225-cid Slant Six or a 318-cube V-8, the Fury Custom had a distinctive black interior with paisley accents, two-tone paint, body-side moldings with black vinyl inserts, and assorted extras. Adding a 318, vinyl roof, air conditioning, power equipment, and free TorqueFlite made up another package. A Custom with the V-8 cost $95 more than a comparable Fury I. The Fury Custom helped increase Fury I assemblies to 21,547 in 1971 from 17,166 in 1970.

Furys for 1971 adopted Torsion-Quiet Ride with its 10 rubberized chassis insulators and 125 square-feet of sound insulation for a quieter, more relaxing ride. A new 360-cid V-8 with a two-barrel carb and 8.7:1 compression ratio was added, designed to run on regular low-leaded gas. Total assemblies declined again to 259,007.

Continue on to the next page to learn about the 1972 Plymouth.

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1972 Plymouth

Inasmuch as the 1972 Plymouth line was entering its fourth model year with the same basic bodies, much more money was allotted to freshening the cars for 1972, indeed enough money to change nearly every panel on the car.

With the Sport Fury retired, the 1972 Plymouth Gran Coupe was the new top of the Plymouth line.
With the Sport Fury retired, the 1972 Plymouth
Gran Coupe was the new top of the Plymouth line.

While the 1972 Furys were being completed, Clayton was transferred to the Imperial Studio. His place as C-body styling manager was taken by Pete Loda, who finished the 1972s and then headed the styling efforts on the 1973s.

A new and ambitious loop bumper graced the front, comprised of twin, open-loop rectangles joined by a smooth, recessed center section. The rectangular openings were filled with horizontally split grillework on exposed-lamp cars, recessed bright vertical bars in hidden-headlamp models.

An open rectangle stamped into the new bumper's center section housed the Plymouth nameplate, a neat touch. The result was a good-looking, even striking, front end (especially with hidden lamps). The hood stamping was of course new to accommodate the fresh design.

Rears were fitted with yet another new bumper. The same formula of short and long versions of horizontal taillights was employed, this time with the license plate relegated to the valence panel where it had last been in 1970.

Sheetmetal was entirely new, smoother and much more highly styled. The fussy breaks and sharp crease lines on the body sides were replaced by a long, supple horizontal "bone line" that ran the whole length of the car from the top of the front bumper. The look was clean, neat, and tasty, though the bone line was often obscured by a vinyl-filled molding.

To appreciate what was really unusual in the new design, one only had to look at the rear quarters. On four-door sedans and hardtops, the quarter panels below the bone line dropped nearly vertical, compared with the inward-sloping sides of the lower body forward of the rear wheel.

The two disparate surfaces were joined at a rakish angle, swept back in side view, from the bone line to the rear wheel opening. This workout added a lot more verve to the bodyside, eliminating the extruded look of previous years. But it was with the two-door cars that Plymouth stylists really got inventive.

Body sides of the formal two-door hardtops mimicked the look of the four-door cars. But the rear quarters of the sportier regular hardtops were quite different. While the metal over the rear wheel also dropped vertically, the sheetmetal aft of the rear wheel mimicked the inward slope of the body forward of the rear wheel, creating an upside-down trapezoid.

As C-body styling manager, Clayton pushed hard for the tricky quarters, recalling how hard modeler Del Holliday worked with designers Walling and Schimmelphen to track the highlights on the clay model. Combined with the lower fender skirt, the creative quarters made the car look especially low and slinky. At last, Plymouth stylists had achieved what they had failed to achieve in the 1969 model: the hunkered down, "lead sled" custom look.

But clever as it undoubtedly was, the workout wasn't universally admired. Some of the buying public just didn't get it. Clayton remembers that the company "got too many comments about 'bashed-in' quarter panels right from day one." Despite the negative comments, the more controversial styling of the regular hardtops proved more popular than the tamer formal variants.

For more on the 1972 Plymouth lineup, see the next page.

For more information on cars, see:

1972 Plymouth Lineup

The 1972 Plymouth lineup continued to be varied, but offered some changes, including mid-year models.

The styling of the less-controversial four-door quarters was adapted to the Suburbans, though not as successfully due to the large, high, rear-wheel openings. But on the Sport Suburban, the bright outline moldings for the wood-grain sides were deftly rearranged to take advantage of the new quarter shapes. The result was that the 1972-1973 Sport Suburbans were easily the handsomest of the fuselage wagons.

Two-door hardtop roofs were new. Backlights were now all convex, with rounded lower corners and upper corners joined at sharp intersections. Though it is difficult to tell in the catalog illustrations, there were subtle differences in the regular and formal rooflines, with the regular hardtops having a chamfered intersection above the backlight and along the intersection of roof and C-pillar.

There were dimensional differences inside as well, with the formal hardtop said to offer "four-door hardtop roominess." Only the Gran Coupe and Fury III lines offered a choice of both formal and regular two-door hardtops. (The Fury II series continued to offer a regular-roof hardtop, but the Fury I dropped its hardtop look-alike coupe.)

The touchdown molding for the vinyl roof option rode higher up on the quarter than previously, giving the regular hardtops the appearance of being chopped, contributing to the "lead sled" image. The power sunroof was now offered on all hardtop and sedan models.

Absent from the lineup was the familiar Sport Fury name, replaced by the Gran Coupe and Gran Sedan, both of which were really hardtops. This meant that a premium four-door sedan was no longer offered.

Similarly, no six-cylinder Furys were available in 1972 and a new 400-cid two-barrel V-8 option replaced the 383 V-8s. These actions reduced the engine choices to four from the seven previously offered.

Shortly after the beginning of the model year, the new Electronic Ignition System, which eliminated the breaker points and condenser, became optional on all V-8 engines, each of which was designed to operate on low-lead regular gas. Steel beams built into the doors for side impact protection arrived with the beginning of the new calendar year.

Mid-year specials included Fury "Top-Hat Packs" on Gran Coupe/Gran Sedan, Fury III, and Custom and Sport Suburban. Later in the model year, disappearing headlights became optional on all Furys.

Arthur Godfrey became the Chrysler-Plymouth Division's chief pitchman. On one TV ad, he asked rhetorically, "What do you get when you call the police? A Plymouth." It was true: Plymouth was America's favorite police car. In both 1972 and 1973, the division built nearly 14,000 Fury Pursuit police cars and emergency wagons.

With the attractive new styling and Godfrey's soft-sell huckstering, production of the big Plymouths surged back up to 278,536 units.

Read on to learn about the 1973 Plymouth.

For more information on cars, see:

1973 Plymouth

In some ways, the big Furys reached their ultimate look in the 1973 Plymouth line, the last year of the fuselage body. With both the feds and the insurance companies agitated over the cost of minor frontal impacts, five-mph bumpers were required up front. The federal mandate caused Plymouth stylists to discard the expensive-to-reinforce loop bumper in favor a "normal" bumper nearly as flat across as in 1969. This time, however, the workout was much better.

This 1973 Plymouth Fury I was one of many pressed into service by police organizations.
This 1973 Plymouth Fury I was one of many
pressed into service by police organizations.

The bumper's flatness was relieved by a shallow vee in plan view, flanked by large, protruding elastomeric guards. Although the vee in both bumper and grille was quite subtle, the new hood sported a grille-wide plateau that terminated in a much more aggressive vee. This clever detail made the whole front end look as if it had more plan view than it actually did, another first-class visual trick by the Plymouth boys.

There was a new wide grille composed of delicate horizontal bright ribs. The Plymouth medallion graced the center and the whole ensemble was framed by a heavier surround molding. Each of the four headlamps was recessed into individual chrome rectangular bezels that floated in body color die-cast end caps. Despite the interference of insurers and bureaucrats, the whole front end looked handsome and expensive.

In back there was another new bumper, the fifth in as many years, and the best of all. Massive in appearance, the new bumper was a testimony in chrome to the art and science of metal bending. Rising from a discreet valence panel, the bumper met the new, shallower deck lid in a horizontal line that wrapped outward at the ends to encompass new, large taillights.

The tall and triangular lenses were tucked inside bright-framed, body-color end caps and U-shaped openings in the bumper ends. Though the sheetmetal on the long rear quarters was unchanged, the combination of the new bumper and recessed vertical taillights gave Furys a very expensive, almost custom look.

The rear bumper was also equipped with large, "hit me first" guards, though the impact requirement was only 2.5 mph. On Fury III and Gran Coupe/Gran Sedan models, backup lights consisted of a central recessed lens emblazoned with the Plymouth name. A new lock designed to offer increased resistance to illegal entry meant that Clayton's hated "belly button" returned to Fury deck lids.

For the first time since 1969, the formal hardtop was not offered, meaning that in 1973, all Fury two-door hardtops had those "bashed-in" quarters, (Interestingly, the catalog contained an error in that the rear quarter panel on a Fury III four-door hardtop was incorrectly illustrated with the inverted trapezoid sheetmetal used on the two-door hardtop.)

The hardtop roster dwindled further as the Fury II surrendered its two-door. Front-door vent windows, last used in 1970, became optional on four-door cars as a concession to confirmed cigarette flickers.

To learn about the 1973 Plymouth Fury Special, continue on to the next page.

For more information on cars, see:

1973 Plymouth Fury Special

At mid-year came the 1973 Plymouth Fury Special, based off the Fury III two- and four-door hardtops. Equipment goodies included unique dark-chestnut metallic paint, parchment vinyl roof and color-keyed body side moldings, wide sill molding, and stand-up hood ornament. (Since the "frog's legs" Plymouth symbol remained on the grille, the Specials had both grille and hood ornaments.) Interior goodies included a parchment vinyl interior with tapestry cloth seat inserts and, yes, shag carpeting.

One special you couldn't buy was built for the auto-show circuit. The Plymouth Aspen was a ski-country white Fury four-door hardtop whose light blue side stripe included a big blue snowflake on the rear quarter.

The new styling proved popular as Fury production rose to 280,630 cars, marking the second-highest total of the five-year run. The increase in assemblies is also remarkable given that the number of Fury models offered in 1973 was the smallest in that span.

The 1969-1973 Furys were the high-water mark for full-size Plymouths. It was the last time that they would be restyled or face-lifted each and every year, and the last time production would rise above 125,000. It was the last time in which Plymouth-brand annual production would approach the 1-million mark.

In 1974, Chrysler Corporation's all-new C-bodies emerged into a hostile world, the result of the OPEC oil embargo and consequent gasoline shortages. The party was over, in more ways than one.

In a déjà vu of the 1969 debuts, while the Chrysler and Imperial were stylishly good-looking, the new Plymouth Fury and Dodge Monaco were once again bland. Ironically, thanks to its popular and economical compact Duster and Valiant, Plymouth regained third place in sales race.

In 1975, the Fury name was given to the intermediate cars, the big Fury becoming the Gran Fury. Production of full-size Plymouths fell sharply, ending with the 1977 model. When Chrysler downsized its big cars for 1979 (just in time for yet another fuel crisis), there was no Plymouth version, something totally unthinkable in 1969.

Though the Gran Fury returned in 1980 for a brief run as a lower-priced variant of the Chrysler Newport, after 1981, the full-size Plymouths were gone forever. Their passing foreshadowed the eventual demise of the Plymouth name itself.

For models, prices, and production numbers for the 1969-1973 Plymouth, continue on to the next page.

For more information on cars, see:

1969-1973 Plymouth Models, Prices, Production

The 1969-1973 Plymouth models were part of the last era of the full-size Plymouth. Their success in the marketplace helped propel Plymouth back into third place in the sales race. Here are the specifications for the 1969-1973 Plymouth:

Convertible prices for the 1969 Plymouth Sport Fury started at $3,502.
Convertible prices for the 1969 Plymouth Sport
Fury started at $3,502.

1969 Plymouth Fury I Models, Prices, Production

Fury I (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,501
$2,701
4,971
4-door sedan
3,533
2,744
18,771
Total 1969 Plymouth Fury I


23,742

1969 Plymouth Fury II Models, Prices, Production

Fury II (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,506
$2,813
3,268
4-door sedan
3,536
2,841
41,047
Total 1969 Plymouth Fury II


44,315

1969 Plymouth Fury III Models, Prices, Production

Fury III (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,516$3,00044,168
convertible coupe
3,7043,3244,129
formal hardtop coupe
3,6013,02022,738
4-door sedan
3,5412,97972,747
hardtop sedan
3,6433,155 68,818
Total 1969 Plymouth Fury III


212,600

1969 Plymouth Sport Fury Models, Prices, Production

Sport Fury (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,603
$3,283
14,120
convertible coupe
3,729
3,502
1,579
formal hardtop coupe
3,678
3,303
2,169
Total 1969 Plymouth Sport Fury


17,868

1969 Plymouth VIP Models, Prices, Production

VIP (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,583
$3,382
4,740
formal hardtop coupe
3,668
3,402
1,059
hardtop sedan
3,663
3,433
7,982
Total 1969 Plymouth VIP


13,781

1969 Plymouth Station Wagon Models, Prices, Production

Station Wagon (wheelbase 122)
Weight
Price
Production
Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,056$3,231
6,424
Custom Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,1033,43615,976
Custom Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,1483,52710,216
Sport Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,1233,6518,201
Sport Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,1733,718 13,502
Total 1969 Plymouth Station Wagon


54,319
Total 1969 Plymouth


370,0351

1970 Plymouth Fury I Models, Prices, Production

Fury I (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
2-door sedan
3,603
$2,790
2,353
4-door sedan
3,640
2,825
14,813
Total 1970 Plymouth Fury I


17,166

1970 Plymouth Fury II Models, Prices, Production

Fury II (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
2-door sedan
3,583
$2,903
21,3162
4-door sedan
3,643
2,922
27,694
Total 1970 Plymouth Fury II


49,010

1970 Plymouth Fury III Models, Prices, Production

Fury III (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,610
$3,091
21,373
convertible coupe
3,770
3,415
1,952
formal hardtop coupe
3,645
3,217
12,367
4-door sedan 3,645
3,069
50,876
hardtop sedan
3,690
3,246
47,879
Total 1970 Plymouth Fury III


134,447

1970 Plymouth Sport Fury Models, Prices, Production

Sport Fury (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,630
$3,313
6,663
S/23 hardtop coupe
3,660
3,379
689
GT hardtop coupe
3,925
3,898
666
formal hardtop coupe
3,645
3,333
5,688
4-door sedan
3,680
3,291
5,135
hardtop sedan
3,705
3,363
6,854
Total 1970 Plymouth Sport Fury


25,695

1970 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe Models, Prices, Production

Fury Gran Coupe (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
2-door sedan
3,864
$3,833
--
2-door sedan with air conditioning
3,978
4,216
--
Total 1970 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe


--

1970 Plymouth Station Wagon Models, Prices, Production

Station Wagon (wheelbase 122)
Weight
Price
Production
Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,125
$3,303
5,300
Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,205
3,518
2,250
Custom Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,155
3,527
8,898
Custom Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,215
3,603
6,792
Sport Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,200
3,725
4,403
Sport Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,260
3,804
9,170
Total 1970 Plymouth Station Wagon


36,813
Total 1970 Plymouth


265,9553

1971 Plymouth Fury I Models, Prices, Production

Fury I (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,708
$3,113
5,1524
4-door sedan
3,742
3,163
16,3954
Total 1971 Plymouth Fury I


21,547

1971 Plymouth Fury Custom Models, Prices, Production

Fury Custom (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
coupe
3,708
$3,208
--
4-door sedan
3,742
3,241
--
Total 1971 Plymouth Fury Custom


--

1971 Plymouth Fury II Models, Prices, Production

Fury II (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,710
$3,283
7,859
4-door sedan
3,746
3,262
20,098
Total 1971 Plymouth Fury II


27,957

1971 Plymouth Fury III Models, Prices, Production

Fury III (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,716
$3,458
21,319
formal hardtop coupe
3,750
3,600
24,4652
4-door sedan 3,752
3,437
44,244
hardtop sedan
3,820
3,612
55,3562
Total 1971 Plymouth Fury III


145,384

1971 Plymouth Sport Fury Models, Prices, Production

Sport Fury (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,805
$3,677
3,912
GT hardtop coupe
4,090
4,111
375
formal hardtop coupe
3,810
3,710
3,957
4-door sedan
3,845
3,656
2,823
hardtop sedan
3,865
3,724
4,813
Total 1971 Plymouth Sport Fury


15,880

1971 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe Models, Prices, Production

Fury Gran Coupe (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
--
$4,396
--
hardtop coupe with air conditioning
--
4,725
--
hardtop sedan
--
4,411
--
hardtop sedan with air conditioning
--
4,740
--
Total 1971 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe


--

1971 Plymouth Station Wagon Models, Prices, Production

Station Wagon (wheelbase 122)
Weight
Price
Production
Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,245
$3,758
4,877
Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,290
3,869
2,662
Custom Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,240
3,854
10,874
Custom Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,300
3,930
11,702
Sport Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,290
4,071
5,103
Sport Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,370
4,146
13,021
Total 1971 Plymouth Station Wagon


48,239
Total 1971 Plymouth


259,007

1972 Plymouth Fury I Models, Prices, Production

Fury I (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan
3,840
$3,464
14,006

1972 Plymouth Fury II Models, Prices, Production

Fury II (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan
3,790
$3,605
7,515
4-door sedan
3,830
3,583
20,051
Total 1972 Plymouth Fury II


27,566

1972 Plymouth Fury III Models, Prices, Production

Fury III (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,790$3,78521,204
formal hardtop coupe
3,7903,8189,036
4-door sedan
3,8303,76346,731
hardtop sedan
3,8553,829 48,618
Total 1972 Plymouth Fury III


125,589

1972 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe/Sedan Models, Prices, Production

Fury Gran Coupe/Sedan (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,735
$3,941
15,840
formal hardtop coupe
3,805
3,974
8,509
hardtop sedan
3,865
3,987
17,551
Total 1972 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe/Sedan


41,900

1972 Plymouth Station Wagon Models, Prices, Production

Station Wagon (wheelbase 122)
Weight
Price
Production
Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,315
$4,024
5,368
Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,360
4,139
2,773
Custom Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,315
4,123
11,067
Custom Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,365
4,201
14,041
Sport Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,335
4,389
4,971
Sport Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,395
4,466
15,628
Total 1972 Plymouth Station Wagon


53,848
Total 1972 Plymouth


278,5365

1973 Plymouth Fury I Models, Prices, Production

Fury I (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan
3,865
$3,575
17,365

1973 Plymouth Fury II Models, Prices, Production

Fury II (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
4-door sedan
3,845
$3,694
21,646

1973 Plymouth Fury III Models, Prices, Production

Fury III (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,815
$3,883
34,963
4-door sedan
3,860
3,866
51,742
hardtop sedan
3,880
3,932
51,215
Total 1973 Plymouth Fury III


137,920

1973 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe/Sedan Models, Prices, Production

Fury Gran Coupe/Sedan (wheelbase 120)
Weight
Price
Production
hardtop coupe
3,845
$4,064
18,127
hardtop sedan
3,890
4,110
14,852
Total 1973 Plymouth Fury Gran Coupe/Sedan


32,979

1973 Plymouth Station Wagon Models, Prices, Production

Station Wagon (wheelbase 122)
Weight
Price
Production
Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,410
$4,150
5,206
Custom Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,420
4,246
9,888
Custom Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,465
4,354
15,671
Sport Suburban 4-door, 6-passenger
4,435
4,497
4,832
Sport Suburban 4-door, 9-passenger
4,495
4,599
15,680
Total 1973 Plymouth Station Wagon


51,277
Total 1973 Plymouth


280,6306

1Includes 3,299 Fury II hardtop coupes and 111 Suburban nine-passenger station wagons built for sale in Canada.
2Includes Fury Gran Coupe.
3Includes 2,824 Fury II hardtop coupes -- 780 built for sale in Canada and 2,044 recorded by the manufacturer as built for the U.S. but not cataloged there.
4Includes Fury Custom.
5Includes 13,045 Fury I sedans and 657 Suburban station wagons built with police equipment, and 1,925 Fury I sedans with taxi equipment.
6Includes 3,176 Fury II hardtop coupes built for sale in Canada, 13,461 Fury I sedans and 480 Suburban station wagons built with police equipment, and 2,326 Fury I sedans with taxi equipment.

Sources: Encyclopedia of American Cars, by the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide, Publications International, Ltd., 1996; The Plymouth and DeSoto Story, by Don Butler, Crestline Publishing, 1978; Standard Catalog of Chrysler, 1924-1990, by John Lee, Krause Publications, 1990; "Hell Hath No 1970 Sport Fury S/23 ... But Ray B. Secrist Does," Muscle Cars, November 1991.

For more information on cars, see: