1964-1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

You look at a Buick Sportwagon or Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser from the Sixties and you think, "I've seen that shape somewhere before." And then it dawns on you: a Greyhound bus. That's where the history of the 1964-1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser begins.

1969 Buick Sportwagon
The bubble-top Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser had a cousin at
Buick (shown) until 1969. See more pictures of Oldsmobile cars.

The Scenicruiser bus, topped by its window-ringed "Vista Dome" roof over the rear two-thirds of the vehicle, first appeared in 1948 as a prototype for Grey­hound Lines, a major General Motors bus customer. (In turn, the dome was inspired by an observation deck atop the cars of GM's predictive "Train of Tomor­row" from the previous year.)

Beginning in the Fifties, GMC built Scenicruisers for Greyhound, great gleaming split-level ranch houses on wheels that gave inter­city passengers a commanding view as they crisscrossed America riding high above the luggage hold and running gear.

Then, in 1964, Buick and Oldsmobile introduced station wagons with this same raised roofline feature inset with windows on three sides. But was the special roof of these wagons truly inspired by the Scenicruisers? Maybe yes ... and maybe no.

"I don't think the idea of the wagons came directly from the buses," said Ray Koenig, who was head of GM's Body Development Studio at the time. "Pete Wozena put it together absolutely on his own. He worked in an advanced studio, looking for ideas for wagons. He developed a number of cars, and did some Motorama cars.

"Pete was sort of an offbeat designer," Koenig continued. "He brought his sketch into the Development Studio, where we did the interchangeable sheetmetal for the cars. We converted the sketch into full-size drawings. Buick and Olds bought into it."

Throughout their lifespans, both the Sportwagon and the Vista-Cruiser were built on stretched versions of the mid-size A-body platform used, respectively, by the Buick Special/Skylark and Oldsmobile F-85/Cutlass. Additionally, both wagons offered the availability of forward-facing third-row seats.

Compet­itors like the Chevrolet Impala, Pontiac Catalina Safari, Dodge Polara, and Chrysler Newport wagons all had rear-facing seats in the third row, while the big Ford wagons had rear seats that faced each other.

Buick offered skylight-roof Sport­wagons through the 1969 model year, then kept the name alive for the next three seasons on a more run-of-the-mill Skylark wagon. Oldsmobile continued with the true Vista-Cruiser through 1972. There were Vista-Cruisers from 1973 to 1977, but these cars -- built on GM's new "colonnade" body for intermediates -- no longer had a wheelbase or roofline distinct from those of other midsize wagons in the corporate stable.

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1964 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

Both the 1964 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser and the 1964 Sports Wagon (as Buick called it in its first year) were introduced on February 4, 1964, about five months after the rest of their lines. While every other model of GM's four brands of midsize cars adopted a 115-inch wheelbase for '64, these new Buick and Olds wagons were mounted on a 120-inch chassis. As such, they were four to five inches longer, bumper to bumper, than the base Special and F-85 station wagons.

1964 Buick Sportwagn
Glass panels in the roof would prove to be
popular -- even if they didn't work as advertised.

The raised roof section created a cargo area that was almost three inches taller than in the flat-roofed wagons, which, when combined with the longer wheelbase, added up to increased cargo room. Head room also increased. This allowed passengers to ride in second- and third-row seats without removing their hats near the end of an era when that still mattered.

"The new forward-facing third seat offers more room, and with a view, thanks to the new Vista-Roof," bragged Oldsmobile sales literature. On both the Sports Wagon and Vista-Cruiser, the raised section began at a point about in the middle of the car. The full length of the forward edge of the "attic" featured a divided window. Additional long, curved panes ran along the sides.

The glass filtered out heat and glare, and was as strong as a metal roof. Buick claimed that the specially developed tinted glass only transmitted 27 percent of the sun's heat, versus 60-70 percent for normal glass. (To cut down on glare even further, flip-down visors were available for the forward-facing roof windows.)

Also, the rear-quarter windows on Sports Wagons and Vista-Cruisers extended to the trailing edge of the body sides, instead of terminating at the wrapped D-pillars of the more-mainstream Special/F-85 wagons.

In Motor Trend's March 1964 cover-story test of the two new wagons, Tech­nical Editor Jim Wright predicted the novelty of the raised-roof design would be a big selling point. "More important, though, is the fact that the bubble is more than just a styling and sales gimmick -- it's completely functional. The added glass area gives rear-seat (and to an extent front-seat) passengers a greater view of the surrounding countryside. ... The added head room has allowed the builder to turn the problematical third seat ... and face it forward," he wrote.

But there were dissenting voices. Consumer Reports, in its April 1964 review of the Vista-Cruiser, called the glass inserts "far from being picture windows," and said they "turn out to be narrow tinted-glass slits, mostly facing upward." Reporting on the Sports Wagon a couple of months later, the same publication wrote that "the strips admit heat as well as light, and are merely incidental to an increase in roof height to gain 'adequate' head room over the forward-facing third seat."

There were other special features that were shared by both brands of the dome-top station wagon. As Oldsmobile salesmen were told, "Entry is easy, too, through the extra-wide rear side door (4 inches wider than ordinary wagons), and the divided second seat folds easily for convenient entry."

The middle-row seat that was standard in three-seaters had a one-third/two-thirds split. The shorter section, installed on the right side, folded and pivoted to allow access to the cargo area or third-row seat. Even on three-seat models there was some room for luggage behind the rearmost row of seats, something contemporaries with rear-facing third seats couldn't offer.

Buick literature noted that there were only 23 inches from the ground to the tailgate, which was the "just-about-perfect height for loading most things -- and if it's a heavy object you're not likely to have to strain with unnecessary lifting."

Despite their apparently identical bodies, published cargo-hold capacities differed between the Sports Wagon and Vista-Cruiser. Buick said its high-roof haulers could accept up to 97.92 cubic feet of cargo. Capacity for the Vista-Cruiser was pegged at 98.5 cubic feet. In either event, that was a good 10 to 13 cubic feet more than what was claimed for Special and F-85 wagons.

A compartment under the cargo floor -- lock optional -- added 5.43 cubic feet of carrying space to two-seat models, or 3.76 cubic feet to three-seaters according to Buick's reckoning. Olds said the compartment amounted to 7.5 and 3.5 cubic feet, respectively. (In its catalogs, Oldsmobile was wont to add in the below-decks space for a stated 102-cubic-foot cargo total in three-seat models and 106 cubic feet in two-seat cars.)

Buick reported that with the tailgate closed, there was a 97.4-inch-long load floor from the back of the front seat, just enough for an eight-foot sheet of plywood. That 4x8 piece of plywood could have almost been laid flat between the wheel housings, too, since that dimension was 46.0 inches. It might have been a tighter fit in a Vista-Cruiser, though, where The Automotive Examiner, an Oldsmobile internal sales publication, reported the space between wheelhouses was 1.2 inches narrower.

Where the cars truly differed, of course, were in surface styling, interior trim, and powertrains. Buick Sports Wagons came standard with a 300-cubic-inch "Wildcat 310" V-8 that was new to the Buick lineup. It developed 210 horsepower at 4,600 rpm and 310 pound-feet of torque at 2,400 revs on regular fuel, with a two- barrel carburetor and 9.0:1 compression ratio.

A higher-compression "Wildcat 355" version of the same engine was optional, offering 250 horsepower and 335 pound-feet of torque. Its four-barrel carburetor dined on premium gasoline.

Apparently some thought had been given to offering the Sports Wagon with the new 225-cube variant of Buick's two-year-old 90-degree V-6; the Motor Trend test car had one. Motor Trend had nothing good to say about its slug­gish performance in the Sports Wagon (0-60 mph in 16.5 seconds), so perhaps it was just as well left alone.

The standard transmission was a three-speed manual with synchromesh in all the forward gears and a column-mounted shifter. Optional was a Super Turbine 300 automatic featuring a torque-converter, variable-pitch stator, and single planetary gear set.

The entry-level engine in Vista-Cruisers was the new 230-horsepower Jetfire Rocket engine. This 330-cubic-inch powerplant offered 325 pound-feet of torque at 2,400 rpm. The 9.0:1-compression engine ran regular fuel through a two-barrel carburetor. With it, Motor Trend ran its test Cruiser to 60 mph in 11.2 seconds.

The optional upgrade was a 290-horse, four-barrel 330. It had a 10.25:1 squeeze and developed 355 pound-feet of torque. A three-speed fully synchronized manual transmission with a column-mounted shifter was standard. Options included a four-speed fully synchronized manual with floor shift and a two-stage torque-converter automatic that Olds dubbed "Jetaway."

Each marque offered four versions of the dome-roof wagons: a choice of two or three seats in base or Custom trim. At Buick, the Sports Wagons essentially became the wagons for the Skylark series. (In fact, the cars were badged as Skylarks, not Sports Wagons, a name used only in print.)

At Oldsmobile, though, model numbers suggest the base Vista-Cruiser was a stretched companion to the low-line F-85 wagon, while the Custom-trim Cruiser provided a station wagon for the uppercrust Cutlass series.

Regardless of brand, Customs featured upgraded upholstery, an instrument-panel "crash pad," deluxe steering wheel, and full carpeting in the passenger and cargo compartments.

Vista-Cruisers enjoyed a slight starting-price advantage over Sports Wagons. Both began in the $2,900 range for a base two-seater and ran up near $3,300 for a three-seat Custom. Despite their late introductions, the high-roof wagons sold well. The Vista-Cruiser actually accounted for the vast majority of '64 F-85 station wagon production, and the Sports Wagon made up close to half of the orders for intermediate wagons at Buick.

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1965 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

The 1965 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser and Buick Sport­wagon (identified as such in print and SportWagon on the car) took on new prominence at their respective divisions. That's because Oldsmobile and Buick discontinued their full-size station wagons after '64, leaving the stretched intermediates to contend with rival makes' big wagons.

1965 Buick Sportwagon and Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
The Sportwagon (left) and Vista-Cruiser were
the main wagons for their divisions starting in 1965.

Here's how the Vista-Cruiser looked compared against the Chrysler and Dodge wagons in an issue of The Automotive Examiner: "The 2-seat Custom Vista-Cruiser, Oldsmobile's super-capacity station wagon with its standard 250-horsepower V-8 engine, Jetaway transmission, power steering and power brakes is priced at $3,496. The 2-seat Dodge Polara station wagon with its standard 270-horsepower engine, automatic transmission, power steering and power brakes costs $3,515. A comparably equipped Chrysler Newport costs $3,904."

The publication also noted that, "considering power-to-weight ratio, the Vista-Cruiser's standard engine pulls 14.9 pounds per horsepower, while the Dodge pulls 15.5 pounds per horsepower and the Chrysler pulls over 16 pounds."

In comparison with Chevrolet, "Oldsmobile's optional 315-horsepower Cutlass V-8 is available in the Vista-Cruiser for only $34.43 extra. Chevrolet's 300 horsepower Turbo-Fire V-8 costs $137.75 more than their standard V-8 and is still 15 horsepower less than the Cutlass V-8."

Changes were few for 1965. As indicated, the Vista-Cruiser's standard engine got a horsepower boost to 250 at 4,800 rpm, accompanied by 10 more pound-feet of torque. The optional version now made 315 horsepower and 360 pound-feet of torque. At 7.75314, tires for the high-top Olds and Buick wagons were .25 inch wider than in '64.

Styling was updated inside and out in line with the rest of the F-85/Cutlass and Special/Skylark models. The Vista-Cruiser's newest appearance feature was a grille that showed the first flowering of the "barbell" look (deeper spaces for the headlights than for the grille opening between them) that would be an Oldsmobile styling cue for the next few years. Side trim on Customs matched the new full-length lower-body brightwork applied to Cutlasses and F-85 Deluxes.

Sportwagons traded in a front bumper that dipped in the center for one that rose. The round emblem in the center of the '64 grille was deleted, replaced by a small hood ornament that bore the Buick tri-shield logo. Though other 1965 Skylarks adopted new spearlike side trim, Sportwagons carried over a wide, brushed-metal panel from the previous year that contained the signature Buick "ventiports."

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1966 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

It was Buick's turn to pick up more power in '66, as the 1966 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser stood pat on engine offerings. For its Buick cousin, the Sportwagon, a stroked version of the 300-cubic-inch V-8 was developed and also used in the full-size LeSabre. It displaced 340 cubic inches, and made 220 horsepower with a two-barrel carburetor and a 9.0:1 compression ratio, or 260 horses with a four-barrel and 10.25:1 compression.

1966 Buick Sportwagon
The bubble-top wagons were the favorites
of Olds and Buick buyers by 1966.

Though the basic bodyshell for the dome-roof wagons remained the same, a thorough reshaping of sheetmetal took place. On the Sportwagon, a pointed hood stretched out beyond the grille, imparting a sense of direction and motion. The grille design itself resembled that of the '65 full-size Buicks, with a thick chrome cross in the center backed by thinner horizontal slats. In back, wedgelike taillights now wrapped around the quarter panels just above the bumper.

The Vista-Cruiser lost the sculpted "fin" that ran the length of the fenderline in 1964-65, replacing it with a more imposing, slab-sided look. A midbody "kick-up" now began in each rear door. The hood and grille were revised, and larger vertical taillights were adopted. Overall lengths stretched to 209 inches for the Buick and 209.1 inches for the Olds.

Tires grew meatier again, to 8.25X14. For the first time, seatbelts were offered as standard equipment for all seats in 1966 as a result of new federal safety regulations. Other new safety equipment included a padded instrument-panel top, padded sun visors, and wiper arms that were brush-finished to reduce glare. Back-up lamps and an outside rearview mirror were also standard across the board.

GM's high-roof wagons continued to hold up well in Motor Trend's eyes. In a comparison of six wagons of different sizes and prices, it found the Vista-Cruiser to be "a well-thought-out station wagon." The magazine said the folding and latching process for the second-row seat was too cumbersome for one person, but once on the road, the Cruiser couldn't be faulted.

"The best handling wagon with or without a load proved to be the Olds," it said in the September '66 issue. "This was due almost entirely to an optional load compensator that didn't allow any deflection under our 720-pound test load. The car cornered with ease laden or empty."

The Vista-Cruiser and Sportwagon were, by now, the favorites of Oldsmobile and Buick station wagon buyers. Even as they outstripped their F-85 and Special brethren, a pecking order emerged among the bigger haulers: Customs sold better than base versions; three-seaters did better than two-seaters.

The trend was especially pronounced in the Vista-Cruiser line, and after producing only 5,075 of the base six-passenger model in the first three seasons, Olds dropped it for the 1967 model year.

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1967 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

As this was the last year of the original design, changes to the 1967 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser and Buick Sportwagon were mostly cosmetic. Grilles and side-trim details were revised on both of the long-wheelbase station wagons.

The Sport­wagon shed its hood ornament and the Vista-Cruiser got a revised front bumper because the parking lights were moved up to a spot between each pair of headlights. Power on the optional Cruiser engine was nudged up to 320 horsepower.

1967 Buick Sportwagon
1967 would be the last year for the original design
of the Sportwagon (shown) and Vista-Cruiser.

The "big" news for 1967 was the availability of simulated wood trim on the sides of Custom models. Buick's treatment covered the entire lower body from a line roughly halfway down the bodysides. Oldsmobile confined its fake wood to below the sheetmetal crease that ran low on the body. A woodgrain appliqué extended across the tailgate on both marques.

A host of changes marked the '68s. All of GM's intermediates underwent a complete redesign, splitting off into a 112-inch-wheelbase platform for two-door models and 116 inches for four-doors and basic wagons.

The high-roof Buick and Oldsmobile station wagons not only shared the new styling, but got a wheelbase extension of their own to 121 inches. Overall lengths increased to 214.1 inches for the Sportwagon and 217.5 inches for the Vista-Cruiser.

Both now came standard with newly developed 350-cubic-inch V-8s, but all these engines had in common was displacement. The Buick engine had nearly square bore and stroke dimensions. With a two-barrel carb, it was good for 230 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque, or, at extra cost, 280 horsepower and 375 pound-feet with a four-pot carb.

The Olds 350 was an oversquare design that started at 250 horsepower with a two-barrel carb, and stepped up to 310 horsepower with four-barrel induction. Then, too, both cars could be ordered with 400-cubic-inch four-barrel powerplants that likewise differed in dimensions and output.

The Buick engine, borrowed from the racy GS-400 pumped out 340 horsepower and 440 pound-feet of torque. The Oldsmobile mill, cribbed from the muscular 4-4-2, developed 325 horsepower and 440 pound-feet -- though a 290-horsepower "Turn­pike Cruis­ing" variant with a two-barrel carb and long-legged axle ratio was available.

A synchromesh three-speed transmission remained standard for all, but automatics -- Turbo Hydra-Matic in the Olds, Super Turbine in the Buick -- were available. The Vista-Cruiser also could still be ordered with a wide-ratio floor-shift four-speed manual. Tires were 8.25X14 on two-seat wagons, 8.55X14 on three-seaters.

All Sportwagons and Vista-Cruisers now were considered Customs -- though Buick did track separate production for its cars ordered with the faux woodgrain option. A flowing creaseline ran down from near the tops of the front fenders through the rear wheel openings on Sportwagons. When ordered, woodgraining was applied below this crease.

The softer contours of the new Vista-Cruiser no longer had a lower-body character line, but the premium Olds wagon continued to confine its simulated wood to low on the bodysides. Rear-quarter windows rose a little higher into the roof than before, and the forward-facing glass in the dome roof was now undivided.

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1968 and 1969 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruisers

Safety received greater recognition for the 1968 and 1969 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruisers, which were very similar models, along with their cousin, the Buick Sportwagon.

Shoulder belts with pushbutton buckles and special overhead storage provisions were offered for the driver and right front passenger. All cars also had energy-absorbing steering columns that compressed up to eight inches upon impact.

­
1968 Buick Sportwagon
A flowing creaseline emerged on the 1968 models.

"We had our first [fully] pa­dded dashes in 1968," said Blaine Jenkins, chief interior designer for Oldsmobile from 1967 to 1970. "There was padding all around. It was the beginning of the safety stuff. The head-swing test was important. It was the first time we had to have padding on the instrument panel, and even behind the instrument panel. There couldn't be anything to contact.

"Oldsmobile was good about spending money on the interior. It made my job easier. The interior was very important to Oldsmobile. They gave us a lot of freedom."

The cosmetically touched-up 1969 versions of both wagons became a bit more user-friendly when equipped with a newly optional dual-action tailgate. A feature first seen on 1960 Ramblers, the tailgate could be opened from the side like a door, or drop down like a conventional tailgate. When opened as a door, a portion of the bumper came with it, exposing a built-in step that aided access to the cargo area.

Otherwise, change was fairly limited for the year. The side woodgraining on Sportwagons was now placed above the sweepspear, and the vertical center bar in the '68 grille was replaced by a horizontal piece.

Vista-Cruiser appearance revisions center on the front, where the barbell look was out in favor of a divided grille to match what was becoming the new divisional styling identity. The headlights were moved back together, and the grille consisted of two groups of nine vertical slats separated by a portion of the hood that dipped down to meet a raised section of the front bumper.

Powertrains were mostly unaltered, though Sportwagons could now be ordered with the three-speed Turbo Hydra-Matic 350 transmissions; the 290-horsepower version of the 400-cube Olds V-8 did not return from '68.

Then, for 1970, there was only one flavor of the GM high-roof wagon available. Buick revived a full-size station wagon, the Estate Wagon, on the 124-inch LeSabre/Wildcat chassis, and made it avail­able with a choice of two or three seats. This seemingly squeezed out the 121-inch-wheelbase Sportwagon.

"There was a lot of competition among [division] general managers," Koenig remembered. "Can­cel­ing the cars when they did was a general-manager call, not a marketing call."

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1970, 1971, and 1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruisers

Olds continued to build the dome-top Vista-Cruiser through 1972, even though Buick dropped its cousin, the Sportwagon, after 1969, and Olds itself added a full-size wagon -- the 127-inch-wheelbase Custom Cruiser -- in 1971. Demand for the 1970, 1971, and 1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser remained fairly consistent, and it seems the only thing that could stop the Vista-Cruiser was a change in GM's intermediate bodyshells.

1970 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
For 1970, the Vista-Cruiser was the only bubble-top
station wagon left.

­Grille textures changed in each of the final years, from a fine rectangular mesh in 1970 to thin horizontal bars in '71, and finally a bold eggcrate. The grille area was enlarged over time, first by descending slightly into the bumper for 1970, then up into the hood for 1971-72.

Front-bumper-mounted parking lights became large round units in 1970, the same year the taillights grew deeper. Powerful-looking twin bulges were stamped into Vista-Cruiser hoods starting in 1971. Inside, 1970's revised instrument panel continued to use a trio of round dials, but without the deep-set "tunnel" effect of the 1968-69 dash.

Availability and ratings of 350-cubic-inch V-8s stayed put for 1970, but with the 400-cube engine now dropped, the Vista-Cruiser could be ordered with Olds­mobile's big-bruiser 455-cubic-inch. Buyers could select 320- or 365-horsepower variants, the latter with manual transmissions.

For 1971, General Motors detuned all its engines to run on regular fuel. As such, the horsepower ratings in the standard Vista-Cruiser 350 V-8 slipped to 240. Among optional 455s, the 320-horse engine was untouched, but the top power choice shed 25 horsepower and was down to 340. For '72, with the corporation's switch to recording horsepower in net figures, the standard-equipment engine was rated at 160, the optional upgrade at 180, and the 455 at 225.

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1964-1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser Specifications

In its day, the Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser attracted a devoted band of customers. When the producers of the television comedy That '70s Show needed a typical period family car for the main characters, they cast a '70 Vista-Cruiser in the role.

Considering that they have become popular collectible vehicles today, the appeal of GM's dome-top wagons remains strong. We give you the goods on this car for its entire nine-year model run with our charts of 1964-1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser Specifications.

1964 Buick Sports Wagon

ModelWeight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Two-seat3,557
$2,989 2,709
Three-seat3,689
$3,124
2,586
Custom two-seat3,595
$3,161
3,913
Custom three-seat3,727
$3,286
4,446
Total


13,654

1964 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

Model Weight (lbs.) Price (new) Number built
Two-seat 3,652$2,9381,305
Three-seat 3,729$3,0722,089
Custom two-seat 3,714$3,1463,320
Custom three-seat 3,781$3,2707,286
Total

14,000

1965 Buick Sportwagon

Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Two-seat
3,642
$2,989
4,226
Three-seat
3,750
$3,123
4,664
Custom two-seat
3,690
$3,160
8,300
Custom three-seat
3,802
$3,28511,166
Total


28,356

1965
Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

Model Weight (lbs.) Price (new) Number built
Two-seat 3,732$2,9372,110
Three-seat 3,809$3,0723,335
Custom two-seat 3,762$3,1469,335
Custom three-seat 3,864$3,27017,205
Total

31,985

1966 Buick Sportwagon

ModelWeight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Two-seat
3,713$3,0252,469
Three-seat
3,811$3,1732,667
Custom two-seat
3,720$3,1556,964
Custom three-seat
3,844$3,2939,510
Total


21,610

1966 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
Model Weight (lbs.) Price (new) Number built
Two-seat 3,735$2,9351,660
Three-seat 3,806$3,0871,869
Custom two-seat 3,765$3,1378,910
Custom three-seat 3,861$3,27814,167
Total

26,606

1967 Buick Sportwagon

Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Two-seat
3,713
$3,025
5,440
Three-seat
3,811
$3,173
5,970
Custom two-seat
3,772
$3,202
3,114
Custom three-seat
3,876
$3,340
4,559
Total


19,083

1967 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Three-seat
3,836
$3,136
2,748
Custom two-seat3,796
$3,228
9,513
Custom three-seat
3,907
$3,369
15,293
Total


27,554

1968 Buick Sportwagon
ModelWeight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
3,975
$3,341
5,916
Custom three-seat
4,118
$3,499
6,063
Custom two-seat, woodgrain
3,975
$3,711
4,614
Custom three-seat, woodgrain
4,118
$3,869
6,295
Total


22,888

1968 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser

Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
3,917
$3,367
13,375
Custom three-seat
4,027
$3,508
22,768
Total


36,143

1969 Buick Sportwagon
Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
4,106
$3,465
9,157
Custom three-seat
4,321
$3,621
11,513
Total


20,670

1969 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
3,952
$3,457
11,879
Custom three-seat
4,052
$3,600
21,508
Total


33,387

1970 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
4,064
$3,636
11,758
Custom three-seat
4,166
$3,778
23,336
Total


35,094

1971 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
4,163
$3,866
9,317
Custom three-seat
4,251
$4,008
20,566
Total


29,883

1972 Oldsmobile Vista-Cruiser
Model
Weight (lbs.)
Price (new)
Number built
Custom two-seat
4,150
$3,774
10,573
Custom three-seat
4,241
$3,908
21,340
Total


31,913

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