Trucks

The Trucks Channel contains information, pictures and specs on truck models from old to new.

Looking to get the most out of your truck? Our Towing Guide has everything you need to know.


The 1957 Chevrolet 3106/3116 Suburban Carryall presaged today's SUVs. It was all steel and a lot easier to maintain than the conventional woody wagons of the time. See pictures and learn about the 1957 Chevrolet 3106/3116 Suburban Carryall.

The 1958 Chevrolet Cameo Carrier pickup was the last of the fancy Cameo line. Though it had set truck styling history with its smooth car-like lines, it cost a premium over other trucks and had never sold well. Learn about the rare 1958 Chevrolet Cameo Carrier.

The slick modern 1959 Chevrolet Fleetside Pickup was Chevy's new sport pickup. Designed mainly to rival the slick Ford Styleside line the Fleetside's chief design feature was its "jet pod" side sculpture. Read about the 1959 Chevrolet Fleetside Pickup.

The 1990-1991 Chevrolet 454 SS pickup helped kick off the muscle-truck trend. To create the pickup Chevrolet plucked its big-block V-8 from the heavy-duty-truck line and stuffed it into a short-box C1500 Sportside pickup. Read about the 1990-1991 Chevrolet 454 SS.

The 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Truck answered VW's Beetle-based bus. Compared to the Volkswagen rivals these Corvair workhorses were larger faster far more fun to drive -- and warm in winter. Read about the 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Truck.

The 1949 Diamond T Model 201 pickup had rugged style and quality construction. It wasn't cheap, listing at $1,655 -- about a third more than Ford charged for the half-ton V-8 pickup. See pictures and learn about the 1949 Diamond T Model 201 pickup.

The 1935 Dodge KC half-ton pickup was a 1930s Dodge success story. Business was so good that production expanded into Los Angeles and Canadian plants. See pictures and learn more about the popular 1935 Dodge KC half-ton pickup.

The 1938 Dodge RC pickup featured solid construction and straightforward styling. The 1938s were the last to use the "Dodge Brothers" radiator badge, and buyers could specify chrome headlights and radiator shells. Learn about the 1938 Dodge RC pickup.

Prewar styling made the 1946 Dodge WC pickup look dated, but it performed well. Under the hood was a more powerful six 95 horsepower, up from 75. Torque was a useful 172 lbs/ft. See pictures and get more information on the 1946 Dodge WC pickup.

The 1947 Dodge canopy delivery pickup was designed for door-to-door grocers. It was made obsolete by the postwar growth of supermarkets and the universality of refrigeration. See pictures and learn about the charming 1947 Dodge canopy delivery.

Practical and rugged, the 1948 Dodge Power Wagon pickup had thousands of uses. Introduced after World War II, the Dodge Power Wagon was Dodge's civilian version of a four-wheel-drive military vehicle.

The 1978-1979 Dodge Li'l Red Truck was the original muscle truck. It came with a pair of tall 2.5-inch-thick chrome exhaust pipes that led straight to a 360-cubic-inch V-8. Learn about the 1978-1979 Dodge Li'l Red Truck.

The 1957-1959 Dodge D100 Sweptside pickup featured classic 1950s styling. It never appealed widely -- perhaps because it had a relatively narrow box and was impractical compared to workaday rivals. Learn about the 1957-1959 Dodge D100 Sweptside pickup.

The 1928 Ford Model A/AA pickup was Ford's long-awaited replacement for the Model T. People rushed to showrooms to see the Ford Model A, and soon it became quite fashionable to be seen in the new Ford. Get details about the 1928 Ford Model A/AA.

The 1930-1931 Ford Model A truck was America's best truck value in the early 1930s. It could do 60 mph, had a modern gearbox and electrical system, and stopped better with mechanical brakes on all four wheels. Read about the 1930-1931 Ford Model A truck.

The 1938-1939 Ford panel and pickup trucks were the new face of Ford trucks. The revamp included a more spacious cab larger cargo box and longer car-like fenders. See pictures and learn about the 1938-1939 Ford panel and pickup.

The 1940 Ford Sedan Delivery had the classic 1940 Ford styling. Many connoisseurs of design declare it the best-looking sedan delivery ever -- and it's hard to argue with them. Learn more about the highly collectible 1940 Ford Sedan Delivery.

The 1940-1941 Ford half-ton pickup is the quintessential prewar truck design. Improved engineering and handsome styling made it a popular choice among truck buyers in the 1940s. See pictures and learn about the 1940-1941 Ford half-ton pickup.

Ford's 1942-1947 pickups moved away from the previous car-like styling, but they offered good performance in a rugged lightweight truck. Learn about the features and collectability of these classic truck models.

The 1951 Ford pickup featured a "Million Dollar Cab" and a standout new front grille with three huge "teeth." Learn about other new features, get specs and find out about collecting these classic trucks.

The 1955 Ford F-100 is an ever-popular classic truck with legions of fans. Get the scoop on this highly collectible model including history, specs and advice on collecting.

The 1956 Ford F-100 pickup truck had it all -- power, safety and style. If horsepower didn't make the Ford F-100 such a popular model, what did? Style. Learn how comfort and styling created an instant classic.

The 1957-1958 Ford Ranchero and Courier pickups were pioneering designs. Ford took a significant lead in a new segment of the auto market in 1957 when it introduced the sedan-pickup. Find out why the Ranchero and the Courier are such collectible vehicles.

Ford introduced the sedan-pickup style in 1957, but only two years later the company had to spice up the Ranchero to compete with Chevy's new El Camino. Find out how Ford updated the Ranchero.

In 1960 Ford shrunk its popular Ranchero. But the new Falcon Ranchero was still a hit as its incredible payload capacity went head-to-head with the El Camino's powerful V-8.