Honda Accord Image Gallery
Honda Accord Image Gallery

©2007 Honda via Wieck The Honda Accord is a perennial favorite of critics and buyers alike. This See more pictures of the Honda Accord.

Honda Accord Overview

The Honda Accord was introduced way back in 1976 as a 1977 model. It arrived from Japan as a compact two-door hatchback coupe, basically a scaled-up version of the original Honda Civic subcompact. That first Accord immediately impressed critics and buyers alike with its smooth mechanical refinement, pleasant front-wheel-drive road manners, topnotch assembly, and strong features-per-dollar quotient.

The world has changed a lot in three decades, yet those traits are still in evidence, one reason why the Accord remains Honda's top-selling passenger car, not to mention one of the most popular cars on the American market. Since 2000, in fact, only the Toyota Camry, its perennial archrival, has outsold the Accord.

Honda Accord Image Gallery

The Honda Accord was redesigned for 1982, by which time a four-door sedan had been added. With sales climbing, Honda decided to build American-market Accords in the U.S., starting in 1984, at a brand-new "transplant" factory in Marysville, Ohio. The reasons were political as well as economic, but the venture proved so successful that other import brands would follow Honda's lead. Accord was again redesigned for 1986, becoming longer, lower, more stylish, and somewhat sportier to drive.

The last was no surprise, given Honda's origins as a motorcycle maker, its long-time emphasis on engineering -- and its occasional involvement in auto racing. Accord became still sportier for 1989, when notchback coupe models were added and top-line LXi versions gained a firmer suspension and steering. Even so, the Honda Accord remained firmly focused on family-friendly transportation. Underlining that point was the new fourth-generation design for 1990, which grew to nearly midsize-car dimensions and offered station wagon models instead of hatchbacks.

Since then, the Honda Accord has been redesigned three more times, each generation adding size, power, refinement and new features to the successful formula. That frequent updating helps explain Accord's continued strong appeal. So does a consistent high level of customer satisfaction, not to mention the consistently strong resale values that have come to be associated with the Honda brand.

This article traces the evolution of the Honda Accord from the original 1977 models to the latest 2007 versions. It's divided by the seven design generations that span these model years.

Each section begins with a description of the major design and engineering features for that generation. It then discusses the significant changes to Accord for each model year within the generation.

©2007 Honda via Wieck As evidenced by the

Beginning with the 1990-1993 generation, each section also includes a segment entitled "Honda Accord Reliability." This lists the car's notable trouble spots as reported by owners and mechanics, and includes problems covered in company-issued service bulletins.

In addition, each section starting with the 1990-1993 generation concludes with "Honda Accord Safety Recalls. These are recalls issued by the U.S. government's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

The Accord is to Honda what the Camry is Toyota: a popular mainstream car that makes a major contribution to its maker's bottom line -- and public image. Each model has its pluses and minuses, yet are closely matched in design concept, price, market position, and other respects. No wonder they've competed so long to top each year's new-car sales chart. Accord has its faults, of course, as does Camry.

Nevertheless, the Honda Accord remains one of America's top-rated cars, both new and used. Learn all about it in the pages that follow.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

  • Get expert analysis of thousands of used cars over the past decade at Consumer Guide's Used Car Reviews.
  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.
2007 hybrid car pictures
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©2007 Honda via Wieck The Honda Accord was an instant success in 1976.

1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord came to America in spring 1976. It was Honda's largest, most ambitious car to date, yet embodied the weight-conscious engineering principles born of Honda's motorcycle experience.

A front-wheel-drive layout and hatchback configuration expanded on Civic concepts. As a result, the Accord offered both good acceleration and above-average fuel economy in a trim yet surprisingly roomy compact package. It also showed uncommon attention to detail, something Americans were coming to expect of all Japanese cars. Just as important, it reaffirmed Honda's commitment to cleaner air with a new CVCC engine.

With all this, the Accord was an instant sales hit. Demand fast-outstripped supply, but customers willingly endured months-long waits for delivery. Freshened styling and the addition of a four-door sedan body style kept sales humming along into the 1980s. In fact, the Accord proved so popular that Honda decided to build it in the U.S. This step wasn't taken done to alleviate a short-term supply problem. It was a political and economic move, and it demonstrated that American workers could make high-quality cars just like their Japanese counterparts.

1977 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord made its debut as a two-door hatchback coupe with front-wheel drive and a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine with three-barrel carburetor, single overhead camshaft, and Honda's patented CVCC "lean burn" combustion system. Horsepower was a modest 68, but that was sufficient for the 2018-pound base weight. A five-speed manual transmission was standard. A two-speed Hondamatic transmission was optional but seldom ordered, as it lacked the smoothness and flexibility of American automatics.

Dimensionally, the Accord was a notch larger than the hatchback Civic, close in size to the contemporary Volkswagen Scirocco sports coupe. Wheelbase was 86.6 inches; length-width-height measured 162.8 x 63.8 x 52.4 inches. Other design highlights included four-wheel independent suspension, standard power brakes with front discs, and precise rack-and-pinion steering.

Equally unusual for an economy compact were the Accord's many no-cost features. These included AM/FM radio, trip odometer, tachometer, rear window wiper/washer, defroster vents for the front-door glass, intermittent wipers, day/night interior mirror, and a folding rear seatback. Also included were a handy dashboard coin box, a graphic display showing when doors and hatchback were ajar, and maintenance reminder lights for tire rotation and oil/oil-filter changes.

The price for all this was around $4,000, which put Accord at the top of the compact class, but that figure was not unreasonable considering the many standard goodies and high-level workmanship. The Accord was not without problems, including premature rust in snowbelt areas, overheating, and various troubles with the exhaust system, carburetor and brakes. Still, it was more reliable and durable than good many U.S. cars of the day.

1978 Honda Accord

A second model was the highlight of Accord's second model year. Called LX, for "luxury," it added to base-model equipment with standard air conditioning, variable-assist power steering, steel-belt radial tires, a digital clock, AM/FM stereo radio, and deluxe interior trim. The price for all this was about $600, rather a lot in those days. Honda continued its practice of offering no factory options, though dealers stocked various accessories priced to return a handsome profit.

1979 Honda Accord

A four-door sedan joined the 1979 Honda Accord lineup, and all three models adopted a 1.8-liter engine with 72 horsepower, a gain of four from the previous 1.6. The sedan was a little heavier and nearly inches longer than Accord hatchbacks, but shared most other dimensions and features.

©2007 Honda via Wieck In 1979, the more powerful Honda Accord sedan was introduced.

1980 Honda Accord

Though period inflation was still causing widespread "sticker shock," Honda Accord sales kept trending up this model year. There was only one major change, but it was important: a modern three-speed automatic transmission to replace the unpopular Hondamatic. It was optional for all models at $250, but emissions requirements dictated that engine power be dialed back to 68.

1981 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord was unchanged except for revised colors and interior fabrics, plus standard variable-assist power steering for the sedan. This would be the last year for the first-generation design -- and Accord's last five-year design cycle before 1998.

The Accord was a winner from the start, fast becoming a regular on Consumer Guide's new-car Best Buy list. There were good reasons for that. As the magazine noted in 1981, this Honda "is aptly named. It's a harmonious blend of small-car economy, a surprisingly smooth ride, low noise levels, careful workmanship inside and out, and pleasing performance. It's also most enjoyable to drive. About the only two areas of dis[/i]cord are the trunk and back seat, both of which are bit small for most Americans...What you're actually getting in the Accord is a kind of midget limousine. It also offers some of the most intelligent engineering in the industry...[T]he Accord is not a bargain, but it does offer solid and reliable value for the money."

As you'll see on the following page, the Accord became increasingly refined -- and popular -- with the 1982, 1983, 1984, and 1985 generation.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

  • Get expert analysis of thousands of used cars over the past decade at Consumer Guide's Used Car Reviews.
  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.
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©2007 Honda via Wieck The 1982 Honda Accord was longer and roomier than its predecessors.

1982, 1983, 1984, 1985 Honda Accord

Building on the original Accord's solid success, Honda kept its top-selling car on the path of ever-more sophistication and refinement. The redesigned 1982 models found an even wider audience, and sales continued to climb. But a lingering recession and deep job cuts in the U.S. auto industry fueled a growing antagonism toward Japanese vehicles in some quarters.

Critics charged that Honda and other Japanese brands with "dumping" cars, thus stealing sales from American manufacturers and forcing them to layoff workers. It was in this heated political atmosphere that Honda became the first Japanese automaker to build cars in the U.S. The hot-selling Accord was the logical candidate, and in late 1982 a new "transplant" factory in Marysville, Ohio, began turning out Accord sedans. This was mainly a business decision, and bold one, with no guarantee of a payoff. But succeed it did, and other Japanese brands soon followed Honda's lead. The auto industry hasn't been the same since.

1982 Honda Accord

Though not evident at a glance, the redesigned 1982 Honda Accord was somewhat longer, wider and roomier than previous models. Wheelbase was stretched nearly three inches to 96.5, and overall length increased about two inches. A three-model lineup returned, and the mechanical package was little changed, though rated horsepower rose by three to 75. Styling was familiar too, but a bit smoother and better resolved. Despite all this, the Accord kept its people-pleasing character. Honda was just offering more of a good thing. In the process, the Accord became somewhat quieter and smoother riding. It also felt more substantial despite being little heavier. And fuel economy was still top-of-the-class at an honest 26-30 miles per gallon.

1983 Honda Accord

Honda began selling its historic U.S.-built Accord sedans this model year. Hatchback coupes were still imported from Japan, as were some sedans, as it took time for the new Ohio plant to reach full speed. Some pundits expected build quality would suffer, but Consumer Guide and most others discerned little difference in the American Accords.

Aside from that, there was but one notable change affecting every 1983 Honda Accord: a four-speed automatic transmission to replace the previous three-speed option. The extra gear allowed cruising at lower rpm to the benefit of fuel economy, aided by a lockup torque-converter clutch that reduced the fuel-wasting internal slippage associated with automatic. Other manufacturers offered similar transmissions, Detroit included.

©2007 Honda via Wieck Honda really pushed its 1983 Accord hatchback -- and the public responded by buying them up.

1984 Honda Accord

Appearance updates, a larger engine and a new luxury-trim sedan made up the 1984 Honda Accord story. All models now carried a 1.8-liter four-cylinder with 86 horsepower; a three-barrel carburetor continued. Honda's sporty Prelude coupe was redesigned in 1983 around this same engine, but with dual carburetors and 100 horsepower. An LX-trim sedan was added with most of the same features as the LX hatchback. Both sedans received a fresh "face."

Coupes got a lower hoodline, specific nose styling, revised bumpers, and a hatch lid with integrated spoiler. They also received orange gauge graphics and a firmer suspension with a rear stabilizer bar added. All these changes were intended to give Accord coupes a sportier personality for added market appeal. Speaking of which, Accord sales this year broke into the top-10 ranks for the first time, though it was not be the last.

1985 Honda Accord

Closing out the car's second generation, the 1985 Honda Accord lineup gained a spiffier luxury sedan, the SE-i. Future Accord generations would also end with SE (Special Edition) models, though not even Honda might not have known that in 1985. As on some European cars, the "i" stood for fuel injection, Honda's new port electronic system with a separate squirter for each cylinder. Horsepower checked in at 101, versus an unchanged 86 on other models. The SE-i replaced the four-door LX, but was even ritzier, with leather upholstery, power-operated glass sunroof, and special exterior trim as exclusive and standard. Other 1985 Accords received only detail trim changes.

The second-generation design cemented Accord's reputation as one of the best compact-car buys on the market. As Consumer Guide noted in 1985: "The front-drive Accord has consistently been highly ranked by our auto staff for its overall refinement, perky performance and neat assembly quality. Our most recent test car was an American made LX sedan that was probably the best-built Accord we've seen to date. [And] we averaged 27 mpg with manual transmission. Other cars in this size and price range are equal to or close to Accord in equipment and assembly, but none seem to match the smooth, quiet nature of Honda's 1.8-liter engine. It's still at the head of the class for our money."

Go to the next page to find out what the third design generation of the Honda Accord had to offer.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

  • Get expert analysis of thousands of used cars over the past decade at Consumer Guide's Used Car Reviews.
  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.
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©2007 Honda via Wieck The 1986 Honda Accord had a sleek new design and more power.

1986, 1987, 1988, 1989 Honda Accord

The 1986 Honda Accord kicked off the car's third design generation with a sleek new look, larger dimensions and more power. The result was an Accord that managed to be both sportier and, in new top-line LXi trim, more luxurious. The same could be said for the entire Honda line, which was fast expanding to include nifty two-seat Civic-based coupes -- mini sports cars called CRX -- as well as an upscale compact and large sedan sold separately under a new brand name, Acura.

All this testified to Honda's roaring success in North America. Indeed, the company would soon be making more money in the New World than it did in Japan. Yet despite the model proliferation, the Accord remained Honda's chief moneymaker. Even the '86s, for all their obvious changes, maintained the key attributes that made Accords so appealing to American consumers. The 1989 addition of notchback coupe models further enhanced Accord's popularity.

1986 Honda Accord

Most cars billed as "all new" really aren't, but the 1986 Honda Accord truly was. About the only things carried over were front-wheel drive and transversely mounted four-cylinder engine. Smooth new styling, announced by hidden lamps, complemented the usual low-slung Accord stance and brought larger dimensions. Wheelbase went up a sizable 5.9 inches to 102.4, which helped increase rear-seat space. Length extended to 174.8 inches on hatchback coupes and to 178.5 on sedans.

The new models were also a bit wider (66.7 inches) and heavier by 100-200 pounds depending on body style and equipment. Front and rear axle widths were broadened, which combined with a redesigned four-wheel independent suspension to improve handling and roadholding that were already quite sporty for a family compact.

Models were comprised of coupes and sedans in base DX and nicer LX trim, plus new LXi versions. The four-cylinder engine retained a single overhead camshaft, but was a clean-sheet design displacing 2.0 liters instead of 1.8. LXi models came with Honda's new electronic multiport "Programmed Fuel Injection" and claimed 110 horsepower, a new high for Accord. Other models had a two-barrel carburetor and 98 horsepower.

Both engines teamed with five-speed manual and optional four-speed automatic transmissions. Among several new convenience features were a fold-down rear seatback for sedans (with security keylock on the rear parcel shelf) and standard power antenna and door mirrors for LX and LXi models. The LXi duo included a power glass sunroof that was unavailable on other models.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The 1986 Accord LXi models boasted 110 horsepowe.

The midrange LX versions proved to be the most popular of the new Accords, offering most LXi features for not much more money than the plain DX versions. After testing an '86 sedan, Consumer Guide found that "[d]espite higher prices and only average performance and fuel economy, the Accord LX remains an excellent buy that's only enhanced by its new, larger size. As always, its spirited character and high mechanical and ride refinement set it apart from the compact herd." The editors also liked a test LXi hatchback for its zippier performance and all-round competence. "It's sporty enough to rival the costlier, stiffer-riding Prelude [coupe] as the 'enthusiast's' Honda, and that's saying a lot."

1987 Honda Accord

The third-generation Honda Accord was predictably little changed for the sophomore 1987 model year. Hatchback coupes gained automatic front shoulder belts in line with a new federal mandate that at least 10 percent of a manufacturer's cars have "passive restraints." As in other cars, these attached between inboard anchors and tracks on the windshield pillars. Closing the doors caused the belts to run along the tracks (via electric motors) into proper position; opening the doors automatically pivoted them out of the way. This operation led to the nickname "mousebelts." They were meant as a convenience, but still required separate lap belts fastened manually. Aside from this, new colors and a reoriented power-door-lock switch, the '87 Accords were '86-model reruns.

1988 Honda Accord

Sportier LXi models and the addition of a notchback coupe body style headlined the 1988 Honda Accord story. The new notchbacks offered the same three trim levels as other models and were essentially "two-door sedans" with a different rear roofline. This body style was suggested and designed by Honda's U.S. arm. It reflected the fact that, unlike Japanese and European consumers, most Americans thought hatchbacks, however sporty looking, were too much like utilitarian station wagons; they also preferred the security of a lockable trunk over a hatchback's more-exposed cargo area. Interestingly, the notchback coupe proved quite a hit in Japan, partly because it was built only at Honda's Ohio plant and thus had a certain "foreign mystique" that locally produced Accords did not.

Honda had always planned to export this body style from the U.S. -- the first "transplant" automaker to do so. What it didn't count on was the high demand among trendy Japanese youth for American-built Accords with left-hand drive, not the right-hand-drive conversions that would normally be sent to that market.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The notchback coupe Accord, designed by Honda U.S., was new for 1988.

Every 1988 Honda Accord received subtle styling changes, plus structural reinforcements intended to improve driving feel and quietness. Also new were outboard rear lap/shoulder belts to replace lap belts. Sedans added height-adjustable front shoulder-belt anchors. Last but not least, LXi models upped their fun-to-drive factor by adding 10 horsepower for 120 in all, plus a firmer suspension with larger front and rear anti-roll bars, 14-inch alloy wheels to replace 13s, and higher-performance tires.

1989 Honda Accord

The return of a plush SEi sedan was the highlight for the 1989 Honda Accord. As in 1985, it signaled the end of one design generation and the imminent arrival of the next. This year's SEi was basically an LXi sedan gilded with standard leather upholstery and a high-power Bose-brand stereo system.

The third-generation Accord would be a tough act to follow. Consumer Guide in 1989 termed it "the class of the compact class...an outstanding all-around buy among family cars. Attractions include decent room for four, adequate cargo space, a comfortable driving position, superb outward vision, exemplary workmanship and good fuel economy...[W]e rate the LX sedan as the best Accord buy on a value-per-dollar basis.

Though strong resale value and high marks for reliability sooth some of the sticker shock, the Accord is still pricey for a compact. Part of the problem stems from rapid price escalation...as the dollar weakened against the [Japanese] yen. But mostly, high demand for a very good car makes it a seller's market for Accords."

That situation would change somewhat in later years, but not as much as the car itself. See the next page to learn more about the evolution of the Accord.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

  • Get expert analysis of thousands of used cars over the past decade at Consumer Guide's Used Car Reviews.
  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.
2007 hybrid car pictures
2007 hybrid car pictures

©2007 Honda via Wieck A complete redesign in 1990 moved the Accord into the midsize category.

1990, 1991, 1992, 1993 Honda Accord

Continuing to evolve at an unusually rapid pace, the 1990 Honda Accord started another four-year design cycle for this popular car. That year's Toyota Camry was little changed, as was the market-leading Ford Taurus, so being all new was a sales asset. Honda would follow up for '91 with the first-ever Accord wagons, thus belatedly answering those two rivals. Honda also began adding key new safety features such as antilock brakes (ABS) and front-impact airbags.

1990 Honda Accord

A stem-to-stern redesign for 1990 effectively moved Accord from compact to midsize status. Four-door sedans and two-door coupes returned, but not the sloped-roof two-door hatchback coupes. Wheelbase added 4.7 inches (to 107.1 inches), while overall length stretched an extra 5.1 inches (to 184.8). Styling was evolutionary, so tailored bodylines and a glassy superstructure continued. The main change was at the front, where exposed headlights replaced hidden flip-up lamps.

Also continued were front-wheel drive and a transversely mounted four-cylinder engine, but the familiar 2.0 powerplant was replaced by a new-design 2.2-liter unit, still with single overhead camshaft and offered in two versions, but this time with multipoint fuel injection for both. Horsepower was 125 for the base DX and mainstream LX models, 130 for the top-line EX coupe and sedan (replacing LXi). Transmissions were also new: a five-speed manual and optional four-speed automatic.

The automatic now featured electronic shift control and two shift modes: Normal and Sport. Sport improved acceleration by delaying upshifts to higher rpm than in Normal mode. Despite the larger engines and weight gains of over 200 pounds, Accord's thrifty EPA-rated fuel economy was little changed. As before, all Honda Accords were equipped in front with manual lap belts and motorized shoulder belts, the latter to meet a federal requirement for "passive" occupant restraints.

©2007 Honda via Wieck Critics praised the overall quality of the 1990 Accord.

Most 1990 Honda Accord sedans and all coupes sold in the U.S. were sourced from Honda's Ohio plant. Honda said American-built Accords were over 70 percent domestic by content, including labor, a point made to answer criticism that rising demand for all Japanese cars (not just Honda's) was costing jobs in the American auto industry. Per Honda policy, the Accord offered no factory options, the various models being priced separately according to transmission (manual or automatic) and equipment level. This practice would continue into the future.

Consumer Guide had named the Accord a Best Buy on many occasions, and did so again for 1990. After praising the new models on many counts, the editors concluded: "[T]he new Accord's spacious interior, greater refinement, solid construction, improved dynamic qualities and impressive overall quality make it a fine choice, whether you consider it a large compact car or a small midsize."

1991 Honda Accord

The addition of four-door wagons and a premium SE (Special Edition) sedan helped the 1991 Honda Accord nail the number-one spot in U.S. retail car sales for the calendar year. The wagon, designed in the U.S. by Honda's R&D branch, was offered in LX and EX trim and was sourced exclusively form Honda's Ohio factory. It wore specific rear-end styling with a single-piece liftgate. The SE mirrored like-named predecessors in having standard leather upholstery, but was also the first Accord to include four-wheel disc brakes with antilock control, an important plus for active safety. It also boasted 140 horsepower, 10 more than EX models. Previous SE Accords had been issued in the final year of a design generation as a sort of farewell gesture, but that wasn't the case here.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The introduction of the Accord four-door wagon in 1991 boosted Honda sales.

1992 Honda Accord

The SE sedan was dropped from the 1992 Honda Accord lineup, but that year's EX sedan, coupe and wagon inherited its 140-horsepower engine and standard antilock brakes with rear discs instead of drum brakes. ABS remained unavailable for other models, but a driver-side airbag became standard for all 1992 Accords.

With the American market becoming ever more affluent, Honda became the first import brand to offer a separate luxury line, launching the Acura nameplate in 1988. The 1992 Acura Vigor was basically a stretched Accord with slightly different styling, a five-cylinder inline engine, and upscale trim and features. Sized and price between Acura's flagship Legend models and entry-level Integras, the Vigor aimed to answer to the well-received V6 Lexus ES 300 at Toyota's luxury division. The Vigor proved a much tougher sell, however, though it would lead to more-popular midrange Acuras.

1993 Honda Accord

The SE sedan returned as the top-line 1993 Honda Accord, and there was a new SE coupe. Both included unique alloy wheels, leather upholstery, and premium Bose audio system, but the sedan was the only '93 Accord equipped with a passenger-side airbag. Consumers had shown a marked preference for airbags over motorized shoulder belts, and twin inflatable restraints would soon be universal. Accord had taken some knocks for not having an available V6 engine like most other midsize cars. Even so, Consumer Guide said Honda's mainstay seller still "shines for high refinement and good performance even with the four-cylinder engine, plus fine ride, sensible controls, an airy low-cowl cabin with terrific all-round visibility, and standard [driver's] airbag."

Honda Accord Reliability[/b]

: The CD changer in the trunk, a dealer installed option, may not eject; CD magazines will be exchanged for redesigned units.

: Cars with high mileage may begin to shift more harshly; this may be corrected by adding a bottle of Lubeguard conditioner to the automatic transmission fluid.

: The parking brake may not fully release because a rivet on the brake rod is too tight.

: A squealing noise from under the hood is likely to be caused by a worn alternator bearing; it may have failed because the belt tension was too great.

Steering noise (1990, 1991, 1992, 1993): If there is a squeak or squeal in the steering, especially when making a slow, tight turn, look for a label on the power steering reservoir that says PSF-V additive was added. If the noise is still present after additive was installed, the right-side end seal on the steering rack will have to be replaced.

Honda Accord Safety Recalls[/b]

1990, 1991: Front seatbelt release buttons can break and pieces can fall inside.

1991 wagons: Improperly attached washer in cargo area light may have fallen inside during assembly; if tailgate is open and switch is in its middle position, washer can cause short circuit that causes switch to overheat, resulting in fire.

1991, 1992, 1993 wagons: Rear outboard seatbelts may lock-up at angles other than those required by federal standard; this could increase risk of injury in a sudden stop or accident.

1992: Left seatbelt assemblies on a few cars were installed on the right side; as a result, the belt cannot be pulled out of the retractor, making it unusable.

See the next page to find out about the 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997 Accord, a generation that saw, among other things, continued advancements in styling.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

  • Get expert analysis of thousands of used cars over the past decade at Consumer Guide's Used Car Reviews.
  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.
2007 hybrid car pictures
2007 hybrid car pictures

©2007 Honda via Wieck Despite its redesign, the 1994 Accord models didn't increase in size.

1994, 1995, 1996, 1997 Honda Accord

The 1994 Honda Accord initiated another four-year design cycle to kick off the car fifth generation. Accord was still a bit small for a midsize car, but fresh styling and the advent of V6 power helped maintain its popularity -- and perennial Best Buy status at Consumer Guide. Previous Accords had rather sporty road manners for a mainstream car.

The '94s were no different, but they also felt more substantial and poised than any previous Accord -- almost like certain European import cars costing far more. Speaking of which, Accord maintained or increased sales in this period despite higher prices, especially for V6 models. Evidently, buyers still recognized this Honda as a "class act" among midsize cars.

1994 Honda Accord[/b]

Accord was redesigned for 1994, highlighted by more power and a larger interior with standard dual airbags. Unlike most makeovers, this one did not produce an appreciably larger Honda. Wheelbase was about the same as before, overall length was 1.2 inches trimmer, and weight showed little change. The main dimensional gain was in overall width, which swelled a full three inches to increase total interior volume in fact as well as in feel.

Honda again offered Accord coupes and sedans in DX, LX, and EX trim, plus LX and EX four-door wagons. Dual dashboard airbags were now standard for all Accords, not just the EX sedan, thus eliminating the front motorized "mousebelts" so many people disliked. Another safety plus was first-time availability of antilock brakes for DX and LX. ABS was standard for EX models, which also featured such niceties as power driver's-seat height adjustment, remote keyless entry, and 15-inch alloy wheels versus other model's 14-inch steel rims.

Powerteams were among the few things not changed for 1994. A 2.2-liter four-cylinder engine continued with 130 horsepower for DX and LX, 145 for EX. Both versions again teamed with five-speed manual transmission or optional four-speed automatic.

Consumer Guide was impressed by the '94 Accord "as a solid-feeling family car with a refined sporty manner. But we believe it needs a V6 engine to compete head-on with its top rivals, the Toyota Camry and Ford Taurus." As events soon proved, Honda thought so too.

1995 Honda Accord

Accord finally pulled abreast of the competition by offering its first V6 engine: a 2.7-liter unit with twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, and 170 horsepower. This was basically an updated version of the 1986-90 Acura Legend powerplant. The Accord V6 was limited to LX and EX sedans. It was physically larger than the four-cylinder, so V6 models had a slightly longer nose and a different grille as subtle identifiers.

Both were equipped like their four-cylinder counterparts except for larger tires; the EX V6 also included leather upholstery and eight-way power driver's seat. Prices set a new high for Accord at over $22,000. But other mainstream midsize cars were pushing luxury, and Honda couldn't afford to be left out. Other Accords were little changed for 1995 except that the EX wagon now came only with automatic transmission.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The 1995 Accord's V6 helped power the model past the competition.

Consumer Guide found Accord's V6 didn't make "a huge difference in acceleration" versus the four-cylinder engine, but did judge it quieter, smoother, and almost as thrifty with fuel. Either way, said the editors, "The Accord is an excellent choice among midsize cars."

1996 Honda Accord

Refinement was the keynote for the 1996 Honda Accord lineup. All models received an appearance update via larger bumpers, new parking lamps, and restyled taillights. Four-cylinder models also sported new chrome grilles like those of top-line V6 models. Coupes and sedans emphasized convenience with a larger trunk opening and a rear-seat pass-through feature, the latter handy for carrying long items like skis. A six-way power driver's seat became standard for the LX V6 sedan and all EX models with optional leather upholstery. Changes this year were otherwise minimal.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The Accord got a facelift in 1996 with features such as larger bumpers.

Meantime, Honda's Acura division introduced two midrange sedans to replace the Vigor. Based on the latest Accord design, the 1996 Acura TL offered a 176-horsepower 2.5-liter five-cylinder engine or a 3.2-liter V6 with 200 horsepower. These cars sold somewhat better than the Vigor, but the midsize Acura remained far less popular than the rival Lexus ES 300. Also new this year was the Acura 2.2 CL, basically a restyled Accord coupe with upscale styling, features and pricing.

1997 Honda Accord

The 1996 Honda Accord continued for 1997 with only one notable change, the return of SE models, a sign that another redesign was in the offing. Unlike past years, however, the 1997 Accord SE coupe and sedan were not top-liners but "value" models, offering some EX features for a few dollars more than the four-cylinder LX versions. Among the included features were the 130-horsepower four-cylinder, automatic transmission, alloy wheels, and upscale amenities like power glass sunroof, remote keyless entry, and AM/FM/CD audio.

Honda Accord Reliability[/b]

: The CD changer in the trunk, a dealer installed option, may not eject; CD magazines will be exchanged for redesigned units.

: Cars with high mileage may begin to shift more harshly. This may be corrected by adding a bottle of Lubeguard conditioner to the automatic transmission fluid.

: The parking brake may not fully release because a rivet on the brake rod is too tight.

: The heater control-panel lights may not glow when the switch is pressed because of breaks in the circuit-board solder joints.

: The gasket for the mid-exhaust pipe can stick, causing a buzzing noise.

: This may not read full even though the tank is filled, due to excessive resistance in the sending unit in the tank.

: If the transmission grinds when shifting into fifth gear, the fork, sleeve set, and mainshaft gear must be replaced.

: Sudden oil loss and subsequent severe engine damage could be the result of an oil plug popping out from the engine's front balance shaft.

: The air conditioning system's high-pressure line may vibrate against the power-steering-fluid line, causing a knocking sound or other noise in the right front footwell area.

Honda Accord Safety Recalls[/b]

1994: Some tire valve stems were damaged during assembly, resulting in sudden loss of air pressure and/or loss of control. Dealers would replace the stems.

1995: Some electronic control units could cause unexpected deployment of the airbags. Dealers would inspect the control units and replace where necessary.

1995, 1996, 1997 except DX and V6 models: The wire harness for the factory-installed air conditioner may be improperly routed, allow wires to rub against each other; this poses the risk of a short circuit that could lead to overheating, smoke, and a possible fire.

1997: Certain ball joints can wear out prematurely and, in the worst case, would separate, causing front suspension to collapse.

The Accord was better than ever in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002. Learn about this generation of the Accord on the following page.

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  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.
2007 hybrid car pictures
2007 hybrid car pictures

©2007 Honda via Wieck The Accord was revamped for 1998, with new styling and safety features.

1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 Honda Accord

The sixth generation of the Honda Accord launched with the 1998 model and aimed to please more people more of the time. It did. As Consumer Guide observed, the previous Accord "had fallen behind its competition, but the new one catches up decisively, especially in the 'space race.' As one of our testers put it, the '98 represents 'more Accord for the money.' It's a must-see if you're looking for a top-notch family midsize." And so it would remain through a longer-than-usual five-year lifespan, its appeal enhanced by the addition of standard safety features and new convenience items.

1998 Honda Accord

The 1998 Honda Accord was virtually all new. The wagon body style was dropped -- buyers were still turning from midsize wagons to sport-utility vehicles -- while the coupe gained a sporty look all its own, courtesy of Honda's California design studio. Dimensions grew only a little, and now differed between coupes and sedans. Wheelbase, for example, was 106.9 inches for the four-doors versus 105.1 for the two-doors. Sedans measured 118.8 inches long, coupes two inches shorter than that. Both body styles stood a bit taller and gained less than 100 pounds.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The stylish interior in the 1998 Accord was the work of Honda's California design studio.

Models offered were LX and EX coupes and sedans with either four-cylinder or V6 power, plus a price-leader four-cylinder DX sedan. Both engines were new. The four was now a 2.3-liter unit, again with Honda's VTEC variable-valve-timing system designed to improve low-end torque without compromising high-end power. It developed 135 horsepower in the DX, 150 in other four-cylinder models. Accord copped its new 3.0-liter V6 from Honda's upscale Acura CL coupe. Also featuring VTEC, this engine delivered 200 horsepower.

As before, all models offered a five-speed manual transmission and an optional four-speed automatic. Antilock brakes were standard on four-cylinder EXs and all V6 models, optional for the four-cylinder LX sedan with automatic transmission. Wheel size was up to 15 inches on all models bar the DX sedan, which came on 14-inch steel rims, and the EX V6 coupe, which boasted 16-inch alloy wheels, the largest standard wheels yet offered on an Accord.

1999 Honda Accord

New-design cars don't usually change much in their second year, and so it was for the 1999 Honda Accord. The list of alterations was short: a standard antitheft system for all models; a power recliner added to the standard power driver's seat in LX V6 models; and standard remote keyless-entry system for all EX Accords.

Following an established pattern, a new TL sedan based on the latest Accord platform bowed this year at Acura division. Though conservatively styled, this 3.2 TL was genuinely sporty to drive with its 3.2-liter V6, quick-shifting automatic transmission, and firm but pliant suspension. It soon became Acura's top-selling model.

2000 Honda Accord

Safety was the focus for the 2000 Honda Accord line. All models gained a dual-stage passenger-side dashboard airbag that would automatically deactivate if sensors determined the passenger was too small or out of position. This idea was to eliminate airbag deployment that could injure such occupants, as shown by various research studies. The feature also reduced repair costs after a frontal collision by keeping the right-side airbag intact.

Perhaps even more significant was the arrival of standard front side airbags for V6 models and leather-equipped four-cylinder EXs. Mounted in the outboard bolsters of the seatbacks, these smaller airbags were designed to protect occupants in a side impact, per recently enacted government standards.

2001 Honda Accord

Further refinements marked the 2001 Honda Accord. A major highlight was the addition of standard traction control for V6 models. Working in conjunction with the antilock brakes, this system was designed to sense front wheelspin and, in the event, to reduce engine power and/or apply the brakes until traction was restored. It was a worthwhile safety plus reflecting Accord's continued adoption of features once reserved for luxury-class cars. Also serving safety, position sensors now covered the side airbag as well as the dashboard airbag for the right-front passenger.

Honda vie Wieck Safety was a major theme for the 2001 Honda Accord.

Again, the intent was to forestall possible airbag injury to smaller or out-of-position occupants, as well as costly, unnecessary airbag deployment with seat unoccupied. All 2001 Honda Accords received subtle restyling, and all but the DX sedan got lighted power-window switches. In addition, EX V6s added standard automatic climate control, in-dash CD changer, and four-way power passenger seat; four-cylinder EXs also got the CD changer; and LXs were upgraded to six-speaker audio with a single-disc in-dash player.

A new coupe headlined news at Honda's luxury division. Dubbed the 2001 Acura 3.2 CL, it improved on its predecessor with smoother styling, more V6 power, a mandatory new five-speed automatic transmission, and a genuinely sporty T-Type S version. Consumer Guide thought the 3.2 CL "should satisfy demanding drivers...and makes few concessions to pricier European coupes in performance, comfort, and quality."

2002 Honda Accord

The sixth-generation Honda Accord took a final bow for 2002, signaled by the return of specially equipped SE coupe and sedan models. Even more affordable were new Value Package editions of the baseline DX sedan. EX versions gained steering-wheel audio controls this year.

Honda Accord Reliability

Airbags (2002): The airbag warning light may come on if a cell phone or laptop computer is plugged into the accessory power socket.

Automatic transmission (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002): On V6 models, transmissions may fail due to lack of thread-locking compound on nut for low clutch. Honda extended the warranty on affected vehicles to seven years or 100,000 miles.

Brakes (1998): The exterior brake lights may not go off. The cause is a saturated float in the master cylinder that should be replaced.

"Check Engine" light (1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002): The EVAP solenoid may fail on vehicles driven where salt is used on roads, causing the "check engine" light to come on.

Oil leak (1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002): Some vehicles may have oil leaks from multiple locations, including boltholes on V6 engines.

Paint/body (1998): If the car is driven on rough roads, the spoiler on the trunk can rub through the paint unless spacer pads are installed between the spoiler and trunklid.

Suspension noise (2000, 2001, 2002): Loose nuts on the rear stabilizer bar cause it to rattle.

Transmission problems (2000, 2001, 2002): Automatic-transmission problems prompted Honda to extend warranty coverage to seven years/100,000 miles.

Vehicle noise (1998): Noises may come from the top of the windshield and rear window because the teeth for the glass fasteners aren't engaged properly. The teeth should be trimmed and wool felt installed.

Wheels (1999, 2000): Clicking noises from the wheels can be remedied by applying special grease between the wheels and hubs.

V6 engine (2002): Two problems were handled as a recall. The automatic tensioner for the timing belt malfunctions, resulting in excessive slack; a problem with the water pump casting causes misalignment of the timing belt. Both components were to be replaced at the same time.

Honda Accord Safety Recalls

1998: An irregularity in transmission cover can allow car to roll down an incline while transmission is in "Park."

1998, 1999: Worn ignition switch may cause interlock to fail, allowing key to be removed without shifting into "Park."

1999, 2000, 2001, 2002: Ignition-switch interlock may not function properly, making it possible to turn key to "off" position and remove it, without shifting transmission to "Park."

2000: Airbags may not deploy correctly, due to improper welding.

2000: Rear suspension lower arms and/or control arms could break, due to improper welding.

2000, 2001: Certain rear seatbelt buckles were improperly manufactured and may be difficult to unfasten after a crash.

2000, 2001: Dimmer control for instrument panel lights on some cars could fail due to heat build-up, possibly causing instrument lights to fail.

2001: Broken plastic piece of air-cleaner box cover could travel into the intake chamber. If the piece lodges in the throttle body, the throttle could stick in a partially open position.

2002 V6 engine: Engine will stall if timing belt breaks due to a misaligned tensioner pulley on the water pump.

The final section focuses on the 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 generation of the Honda Accord, which brought some of the most sweeping changes in the car's history.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

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  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
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2007 hybrid car pictures
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©2007 Honda via Wieck Dynamic styling helped the 2003 Accord compete in the ever-changing car market.

2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord moved into its seventh design generation with the most dramatic changes in its history. Honda played up the 2003 models' bold new look with ads asking "Accord, Is That You?" But typical of Honda, there was new substance to match the new style, including several first-time features and, come 2005, the first gasoline/electric powertrain available in a midsize car. After years of conservative evolution to protect Accord's sales position, Honda again dared to innovate, a genuine necessity in the hypercompetitive market of the 21st century.

2003 Honda Accord

The 2003 Honda Accord answered the redesigned 2002 Toyota Camry with another all-new design boasting fresh, sculpted styling and several first-time features. A coupe and sedan returned with distinct visual signatures, but looked more dynamic than previous Accords. Dimensional changes were modest, with sedans adding an inch to wheelbase and both body styles gaining an extra inch in width. Weight gains were also modest, though years of steady growth made Accords into midsize cars weighing nearly 3000 pounds, a far cry from the original late-1970s models.

The 2003 lineup reprised coupes and sedans in LX and EX trim with four-cylinder and V6 engines, plus the price-leader four-cylinder DX sedan. EXs with leather-upholstery were designated EX-L, but were again priced as separate models. Four-cylinder Accords carried a new-design 2.4-liter engine with 160 horsepower -- up by as much as 25 horsepower from the previous 2.3-liter unit. The 3.0 V6 was retuned to make 40 extra horsepower, 240 in all. A five-speed manual transmission remained standard on four-cylinder models. Optional for them and standard on V6s was a new five-speed automatic, replacing a four-speed. Also new for 2003 was a sportier V6 EX coupe with a six-speed manual gearbox -- Accord's first -- plus special trim and 17-inch wheels (versus the usual 16s or 15s).

©2007 Honda via Wieck The 2003 EX V6 Accord led the way with an exclusive new safety feature -- curtain air bags.

On the safety front for 2003, antilock brakes were finally standard for all Accords, not just high-line models. Standard four-wheel disc brakes remained exclusive to V6s and four-cylinder EXs. Standard traction control remained exclusive to V6 models. Front side airbags were again standard for V6s and four-cylinder EXs, optional for LX models. But in an important development, curtain side airbags arrived as an exclusive standard feature for EX V6s. Designed to protect the heads of outboard occupants in a side impact, the curtain airbags deployed from above the side windows when activated by sensors.

Another first for Accord was a navigation system with voice control for navigation, audio, and climate functions, an option limited to EX models. Every 2003 Hondaa Accord got a tilt/telescope steering column, and all but the base DX included remote keyless entry that could lower or raise the side windows from the keyfob. Joining leather upholstery as standard on EX V6 models were dual-zone automatic climate control and heated seats, which were also available in leather-upholstered four-cylinder versions.

Consumer Guide summed up the 2003 Honda Accord this way: "A perennial Best Buy moves up a notch in features, refinement, and dynamic ability to become more a match for [Volkswagen's] polished, pricier Passat than for the capable but conservative Toyota Camry. With reliability and resale values likely to remain strong, the newest Accord looks like another Honda hit."

2004 Honda Accord

As expected, the Honda Accord followed up its latest redesign with few changes. Traction control was newly standard for all V6 models, not just EXs, and the head-protecting curtain side airbags were now available for four-cylinder EXs as well as V6 versions. Satellite radio was a new standard item for EX V6 and EX-L models.

A 2004 Acura TL sports sedan based on the seventh-generation Accord arrived at Honda's upscale Acura division. Automakers had become very adept at disguising shared platforms, and this Acura was a good example. Like the latest Accord, the newest TL highlighted unique styling, little-changed dimensions, more power, and several first-time features.

2005 Honda Accord

The 1999 Honda Insight two-seat coupe was the first gasoline/electric hybrid car on the American market. After following up with a hybrid version of its small Civic sedan for 2003, Honda introduced the 2005 Honda Accord Hybrid sedan, the first such car in the midsize class.

Hybrids are usually touted for their low emissions and high fuel thrift, but the Accord Hybrid was marketed more on performance. It certainly had the horsepower with a net total of 255, thanks to use of a V6 engine instead of a four-cylinder. This was a 3.0-liter engine with Honda's Integrated Motor Assist electronic control system and a conventional five-speed automatic transmission instead of the usual CVT (continuously variable automatic transmission). IMA referred to a battery-powered electric motor that would "boost" engine power for full-throttle acceleration. As a fuel-saving measure, the engine employed Honda's new Variable Cylinder Management System, designed to deactivate three cylinders when cruising or decelerating.

©2007 Honda via Wieck The groundbreaking 2005 Accord Hybrid is powered by a V6.

Like the Civic Hybrid, the Accord could not be driven on electricity alone, but needed no plug-in charging. Priced at the top of the Accord line, the Hybrid was equipped much like EX V6 models, with standard leather upholstery, satellite ratio, dual-zone automatic climate control, and heated front seats. It also sported a unique grille, decklid spoiler, special instrumentation, and gas-saving electric power steering instead of a hydraulic system.

Another exclusive was Honda's new electronic active-noise-control system, claimed to reduce mechanical, road and wind ruckus. In all, the Accord Hybrid was a technical tour de force, so imagine Honda's dismay when sales came in well below projections. One likely factor was a $30,000 starting price, the steepest yet for an Accord, and likely too steep for most midsize-car buyers.

In the only other news for the 2005 Honda Accord line, curtain side airbags were now standard for all models, along with front torso airbags.

2006 Honda Accord

Accord returned for 2006 with minor revisions to exterior styling and interior trim. As usual for Honda, the changes were hard to spot without having the new and old versions side-by-side. More significant, perhaps, the lineup expanded to include VP ("Value Price") sedans and an LX SE coupe and sedan, all with four-cylinder engines and equipped for plugging whatever price gaps marketers thought existed.

2007 Honda Accord

The Honda Accord concluded a second five-year design cycle with the 2007 season. LX SE models were reduced to one SE sedan priced slightly higher than the base-level VP version. A concept coupe displayed at Detroit's 2007 North American International Auto Show suggested that Accord's scheduled redesign for 2008 would feature more-aggressive styling and slightly increased dimensions.

Honda Accord Reliability

: The airbag warning light may come on due to a defective occupant position-detection sensor requiring replacement. The light may also come on if a laptop computer is used near the front passenger seat, which should be avoided.

: This may come on if the battery gets weak (low state of charge), which would require software updates to the powertrain control module (engine computer).

: The ABS warning light may come on if water seeps into the rear-wheel-speed sensor(s), which should be replaced with improved ones.

: The car may drift from side to side due to uneven camber settings; this can only be corrected by relocating the engine cradle as far right as possible.

: This may not close completely due to a defective limit switch that must be replaced.

V6 engine (2002): Two problems were handled as a recall. The automatic tensioner for the timing belt malfunctions, resulting in excessive slack; a problem with the water pump casting causes misalignment of the timing belt. Both components were to be replaced at the same time.

: Tubing in the windshield-washer reservoir deteriorates, and then gets transferred to the windshield and wipers; the tubing and wipers would have to be replaced.

Honda Accord Safety Recalls[/b]

2003, 2004: Heat buildup in automatic transmission may eventually lead to gear tooth chipping or gear breakage, resulting in transmission lockup.

2004, 2005: During deployment, the fabric of the driver's front airbag may tear after contact with inside surface of airbag cover, thus increasing the risk of injury. Dealers would install a protective flap between the airbag-module cover and the inner module.

2004, 2005: Some vehicles may have improperly installed wiring for the driver's seat position sensor; in a collision, this could cause the airbag to "default" to full inflation pressure, thus increasing the risk of injury for smaller drivers. Dealers would replace the sensor wiring sub-harness.

2005: A loose terminal in the main fuse box may cause the fuel pump to lose power, possibly causing the engine to stall without warning; if the pump becomes inoperative, engine may not start.

2006 Hybrid: Some vehicles may have improperly torqued bolts on the front impact sensors for the dashboard airbag system; the sensors are located near the headlights. If the bolts loosen or fall out, the sensors may not detect a crash and activate the airbags, thus increasing the risk of injury. Dealers will inspect the bolts and re-torque if needed.

2006 Hybrid: Some vehicles may have tires that were damaged when mounted on the wheels. If the bead sealing area is affected, the tire could lose air while driving, thus increasing the risk of a crash. Dealers will remove and inspect all wheels for damage in the bead area.

For advice, reviews, photos, prices, reliability trouble spots, and even examples of used cars you're considering that are on sale in your area, check out:

  • Get expert analysis of thousands of used cars over the past decade at Consumer Guide's Used Car Reviews.
  • You've found the vehicle you want to buy, but only a Vehicle History Report can tell you if the odometer is accurate, if it's received any safety recall repairs, and a host of other essential information.
  • The Honda Accord has been a perennial among Consumer Guide's Best Buy and Recommended vehicles. Find out why, and learn about our other top new-car values.
  • Shopping for a hybrid car? Click here to see the 2007 Honda Accord hybrid and other 2007 hybrid car pictures.