How Formula E Will Work


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Author's Note: How Formula E Will Work

You know what's really weird about electric races? They're quiet. Chirping-crickets quiet.

I've been to lots of electric-powered races, oddly enough. I've been to drag races and time trials. I've seen professionally built team cars and home-built conversions take to the track, too. I've seen record-setting motorcycles and puttering electrical embarrassments, and they're all (every one of them) silent but for the sound of tires on the pavement. Sometimes there's a whirr -- if you're lucky.

So a whole field of 10 Formula E cars circling the track at the same time is going to require some adjustment on the part of the spectators. I guess we're all going to have to do our part to make some noise, because the race cars just ain't gonna do it for us this time. Maybe they could play a Formula One engine soundtrack over the PA?

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Sources

  • Federation Internationale de l'Automobile. "China Racing Becomes Second Formula E Team." Feb. 13, 2013. (March 13, 2013) http://www.fia.com/news/china-racing-becomes-second-formula-e-team
  • Formula E Holdings. (March 6, 2013) http://www.formulaeholdings.com/
  • Formula E News. "The Official Formula E Blog." (March 6, 2013) http://formula-e-news.com/official-media/
  • Formula E News. "Specs." (March 13, 2013) http://formula-e-news.com/specs-fe01/
  • Lola. "Motorsport: Race Cars and Projects." (March 13, 2013) http://www.lolacars.com/race_cars_projects.asp
  • NEDRA. "About NEDRA." (March 13, 2013) http://www.nedra.com/about_us.html
  • TTXGP. (March 13, 2013) http://www.egrandprix.com/