Alternative Fuels

Alternative fuels include biodiesel and hydrogen. Alternative fuels are important because they could eventually provide us with a cheaper, cleaner, and more abundant source of fuel. Check out these great alternative fuel articles from HowStuffWorks.


Has the Volkswagen diesel scandal soiled clean diesel’s reputation beyond repair?

Watching a field of Formula E race cars circle a racetrack is going to require some adjustment on the part of the spectators. Why? Because they're quiet. Chirping-crickets quiet.

The U.S. Navy says it could make about 100,000 gallons (378,541 liters) of JP-5 jet fuel each day using ocean water. But how long will it be before the Navy's plan is plausible?

Specially engineered Flexible Fuel Vehicles (FFVs) can tolerate an E85 mixture of gasoline and ethanol. But will ordinary cars and trucks be able to stand up to the new blend?

For a while, many of us imagined the possibilities: streets full of zero-emission electric vehicles (EVs). But the EV concept has suffered from a certain fragility, and some companies have shifted strategies. Let's talk about a few of them.

Electric vehicles have been around, off and on, for more than 100 years -- and this time around, they're failing to meet sales projections. Is it still too soon to write them off for good?

What if we could derive energy from crops without killing them or generate power using plants and land not needed for food, all through the power of microbes? Meet the newest, greenest "power plant."

Got your eye on a hydrogen-powered vehicle? The energy of the future comes with some baggage, including an uncanny ability to migrate through metals. Here's what you need to know.

In the future, all of us will own flying cars. Oh, wait -- that's "The Jetsons." Our views of future transportation are a little more realistic, but cars will increasingly use electric power, reducing our dependence on fossil fuels. Right?

Gasoline, everyone knows, is a polluting, volatile source for fuel. Still, the vast majority of vehicles around the world depend on it.

Flex Fuel? Ethanol? E85? Been wondering what exactly all of this means? Keep reading to learn about new advances in alternative fuels.

With petroleum-loving masses and tax-happy governments finally getting on board with the development of alt fuels, the race is on to find the cleanest, eco-friendliest, and most importantly, cheapest alternative to fossil fuels.

Are you in the market for the greenest vehicle you can drive that isn’t a 10-speed bike? Natural gas-powered cars could be both cleaner and cheaper to run than gasoline or diesel powered cars — theoretically at least.

Fuel options for the future. Read this article to learn the fuel options for the future,

Fuel cells run on hydrogen, which has a low ignition point. Learn about the safety concerns of fuel cells in this article.

All fuel cells require hydrogen to work. Learn more about a hydrogen fuel reformer from this article.

Different kinds of fuel cells have different advantages. Learn about a solid oxide fuel cell in this article.

Why aren't fuel cells more common? Learn about whether the cost of fuel cells is a major problem in this article.

You may have recently heard a certain oil company touting the fact that they sell nitrogen-enriched gasoline. But is nitrogen-enriched gasoline truly anything to get excited about? Does it really work?

Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are already on the streets in some parts of the world. They're powered by the most abundant element in the universe and produce zero tailpipe emissions. Are fuel cells a good solution?

Did you know hydrogen-powered fuel cells are hitting the streets in some parts of the world? They're powered by the most abundant element in the universe and produce zero emissions. But are they dangerous?

You might be surprised by some of the alternative fuels mentioned here. Which of these ideas are pure crank science, and which have a real chance to change the world?

A hydrogen-on-demand system can provide hydrogen for a fuel cell or for an internal combustion engine. But what about claims indicating you can fuel your car with water? Is there any truth to those statements?

From electricity to saltwater to air, these vehicles run on all kinds of things you'd never imagine as fuel. What might power your car in the near future?

The search for alternative fuel is on. Could a pocket-sized version of a nuclear power plant make your car run 5,000 miles (8,047 kilometers) between fill-ups?