Chevrolet Camaro


The Chevrolet Camaro was more than Chevy's answer to the Ford Mustang, a distinction made clear in the pages of this article. The Camaro was introduced in 1967, during the heyday of the pony-car craze but two years behind the debut of the Mustang.

1968 Chevrolet Camaro coupe side view
The Chevrolet Camaro was Chevy's fresh take on the pony car.
This is a 1968. See more pictures of the Chevrolet Camaro.


During those two years after the debut of the Mustang, Chevy worked to develop a car that hued to the long-hood-short-rear-deck pony-car template, but unique styling and a range of high-performance engines quickly established Camaro as the ride pony-car enthusiasts turned to first for affordable power.

The pages of this article examine the Camaro model year by model year, revealing the look, the equipment, and the spirit that garnered it a legion of loyal fans that continues to this day.

1995 Chevrolet Camaro convertible side view
Camaro was one of America's longest-surviving
sporty cars. Here's a 1995 ragtop.


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  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1967 Chevrolet Camaro

1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The 1967 Chevrolet Camaro was
GM's answer to the popular Ford Mustang.

The inaugural 1967 Chevrolet Camaro was Chevy's four-seat "personal" car, turned out in responding to the limited but significant success of the bucket-seated Corvair Monza -- and, of course, the stunning popularity of the phenomenal Ford Mustang.

Demand for such "ponycars" was strong and growing, tightening the traditional Chevy-Ford rivalry into a Camaro vs. Mustang competition that spanned five decades and is about to be reignited with the introduction of the all-new 2009 Chevrolet Camaro.

Hardtop coupes and convertibles went on sale, both riding a 108-inch wheelbase. Not everyone realized that Camaros were based on off-the-shelf components -- shared by the modest Chevy II, no less -- with engines borrowed from Chevelle. Camaro's F-body was one of GM's first to be evaluated in a wind tunnel.

Early on, engineers decided to use a front sub-frame in combination with unit construction, sandwiching rubber inserts in between -- the first such application in a low-priced U.S. car. Back seats were strictly "for emergency use only."

Single-leaf rear springs resulted in "axle tramp" under hard acceleration with the larger V-8 engines, so those cars were fitted with traction bars. Chevy's 230-cubic-inch six was standard, with a 250-cubic-inch six op­tional. The V-8 selection started with 210- and 265-horsepower 327s, then stretched all the way to a big 396-cubic-inch, 375-horsepower V-8 with four-barrel carb and 11:1 compression.

Midyear brought an SS 350 edition with a 295-horsepower V-8 and "bumblebee" nose striping. Meanwhile, a Rally Sport (RS) package featured stylish concealed headlights.

Despite promotion of Camaro as a male-oriented machine, especially with a hot V-8 under the hood, one in four buyers was a woman. A lengthy accessories and options list let customers personalize the car. Vinyl-covered roofs were optional on coupes.

First-year production totaled 220,917 cars (162,109 with a V-8 engine). That was less than half Mustang's total, but all five other Chevrolet car lines saw diminished output. Chevrolet also issued 602 race-bred Camaro Z28s with a 302-cubic-inch V-8 nominally rated at 290 horsepower but capable of considerably more.

1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 engine
Chevy built 602 Z28s for 1967,
each with a 290-horsepower Turbo-Fire V-8.

1967 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,770-3,180 $2,466-$2,809 220,917

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1968 Chevrolet Camaro

1968 Chevrolet Camaro Hardtop Coupe
The 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Hardtop Coupe
was a brisk seller.

The 1968 Chevrolet Camaro underwent some suspension tweaks, as continuous improvement was a big part of the Camaro picture. New staggered shocks helped reduce the tendency toward "axle tramp" that had plagued early high-performance editions, and rear suspension travel was increased to reduce Camaro's likelihood of "bottoming."

Otherwise, changes were few, beyond the new side marker lights mandated for all cars. A silver-colored grille made up of slim horizontal bars surrounded oblong parking lights. Taillights remained oblong, with separate red and white lenses on the standard versions, and a quartet of square red lenses for the RS.

Like some other Chevrolets, Camaros adopted flow-through Astro Ventilation, deleting the quarter vent windows in each door. Super Sports had a distinctive nose stripe and optional hidden headlights. Additional detailing made the SS 396 stand out -- namely, a black rear panel and a hood with fake air intakes. Another version of the 396-cubic-inch V-8, developing 375 horsepower, joined the options list.

SS Camaros now included front disc brakes. Four-wheel disc brakes became available as a "service option" on the Z28 to give the racing versions better stopping power. Camaro sales had been edging upward, with 235,151 cars built this year (7,199 Z28s), while sales of the rival Ford Mustang dipped in the late Sixties.

1968 Chevrolet Camaro convertible
The 1968 Camaro convertible was a beauty,
but sales lagged behind the coupe.

1968 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,810-3,245 $2,588-$2,908 235,115

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1969 Chevrolet Camaro

1969 Chevrolet Camaro Indy pace car
The 1969 Chevrolet Camaro paced the Indianapolis 500.

The 1969 Chevrolet Camaro, nicknamed "the hugger," received an extensive lower-body facelift that brought a new grille and bumpers, round parking lights, and a reshaped tail. Wheelbase remained at 108 inches, but the '69 body looked longer and lower.

Front wheel cutouts were more square. The vee-shaped eggcrate grille sat farther back, sweeping into shrouded headlights. The Rally Sport (RS) option kept its concealed headlights, but their covers added ribs that allowed some light to shine through -- just in case the doors failed to retract.

"Ask the kid who owns one," declared one ad, leaving no doubt about Camaro's target market. Instrument panels were revamped and a steering/ignition lock added. A headlight washer could be ordered, and four-wheel disc brakes became available for all models. Options also included a spoiler, tachometer, and space-saver spare tire.

Anyone unhappy with the standard six-cylinder engine or 210-horsepower 327 V-8 had some tempting choices to consider. A pair of 350-cubic-inch V-8s graced the options list, as did Turbo-Jet 396s putting out 325 to 375 horsepower.

Super Sport Camaros had a new 300-horsepower Turbo-Fire 350 V-8 residing beneath a special hood with simulated ports. Also included with the SS option, which could be ordered in combination with the RS, were black sill moldings, a special suspension, and F70sxs14 tires.

Production rose slightly, to 65,008 six-cylinder and 178,087 V-8 Camaros -- hardtops and convertibles -- starting at $2,638. The total included 19,024 Z28s (far more than in 1967-68). Again rated at 290 horsepower, but actually far stronger, the 302-cubic-inch Z28 engine now inhaled through a "cowl-induction" assembly with rear-facing scoop. Dual throaty-tone exhausts, a stiffer suspension, 15-inch wheels, Hurst linkage, and broad stripes completed the Z28 picture.

A Camaro paced the Indianapolis 500 race, as it had in 1967, and 3,475 "Pacesetter Value Package" convertibles went on sale. This turned out to be an extra-long model run because introduction of the restyled '70 Camaro was delayed until spring of that year.

1969 Chevrolet Camaro Facts

Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,040-3,295 $2,638-$2,940243,095

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1970 Chevrolet Camaro

1970 Chevrolet Camaro Hurst Sunshine Special
The 1970 Chevrolet Camaro, sporting a
new design, is a classic car of the 1970s.

The 1970 Chevrolet Camaro represented the start of the second generation. Because the new models introduction failed to occur until late February of 1970, leftover '69s were sold for a while as early 1970 models.

Then came the totally redesigned, semi-fastback coupe -- no convertible this time -- that would linger for the next 11 seasons.

Styling, not performance, made the next generation a virtual "classic" in its own time. Redesigned from the ground up, the 1970 Camaro shared no exterior body panels with the previous model. Pontiac, of course, issued a closely related Firebird, also developed strictly as a coupe.

Boasting a trendy long-hood/short-deck profile, the Camaro had a protruding front end with a recessed eggcrate grille. Between the headlights and grille, RS models carried smaller round parking lights. Doors were unusually long, and, despite the lack of quarter windows, overall glass area grew by 10 percent.

A smooth, low tail held a Kamm-style flat rear panel. Dimensions were little changed -- just two inches longer, a tad wider, an inch lower, on the same 108-inch wheelbase as before.

As for engineering, the '70s generation followed the original concept: unit body/chassis with a front subframe, a similar lineup of engines, and standard front disc brakes. Four-wheel disc brakes were out, along with such blatant "performance" add-ons as a front air dam or "bubble hood." All told, Camaros were softer, quieter, and more refined. Prices began at $2,749, but as before, a lengthy options list let buyers tailor their Camaros to suit personal tastes.

The base six-cylinder engine was now a 250-cubic-inch unit, but the standard 200-horsepower 307 V-8 remained. A special 360-horsepower 350 V-8 went only into the Z28.

No 327s or 427s reappeared, but the options list included 250- and 300-horsepower 350-cubic-inch V-8s, and a pair of "396" V-8s (which actually measured 402 cubic inches as the result of a bore increase). Six-cylinder sales dipped sharply, to 12,566 cars, but 112,323 V-8s were built (including 8,733 Z28s).

1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The Hugger Orange/Black Z28 model
runs with a 350-horsepower V-8.

1970 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,076-3,190 $2,749-$2,839124,889

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1971 Chevrolet Camaro

1971 Chevrolet Camaro
On the outside, the 1971 Chevrolet Camaro
was very similar to previous models.

The 1971 Chevrolet Camaro needed only a quick peek inside to distinguish it from the previous year's model. This 1971 coupes carried high-back bucket seats with built-in headrests, borrowed from the new subcompact Vega.

Outside appearance changed little, but reduced engine compression ratios allowed the use of lower-octane low-lead (or no-lead) gasoline, which, in turn, caused a reduction in power ratings for high-performance engines.

GM also began to include "net" horsepower figures with some engines that were considerably lower than the old "gross" figures, though more realistic. Modifications this year and next were made to comply with emissions and crash protection laws, but not much else.

Cloth-and-vinyl replaced all-vinyl as the standard upholstery. Rally Sport and Super Sport appearance and performance option groups continued to attract customers. The Z28 got a front air dam and a redesigned spoiler along with a 330-horsepower 350-cubic-inch V-8.

Standard engines were the 250-cubic-inch six and 307-cubic-inch V-8. Taking advantage of the options list could bring one of two 350-cubic-inch V-8s rated at 245 and 270 horsepower, or a "396" with a 300-horsepower rating (240-horsepower net).

Only 11,178 six-cylinder Camaros went on sale versus 103,452 with V-8 power, including 4,862 Z28s. Because ponycar popularity was starting to slip, GM executives began to wonder if the Camaro should hang around. Advocates would have to lobby hard to keep it alive.

1971 Chevrolet Camaro
The usual assortment of appearance packages
on the Camaro were still available.

1971 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,094-3,218 $2,921-$3,016114,630

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1972 Chevrolet Camaro

1972 Chevrolet Camaro
The 1972 Chevrolet Camaro received
only modest exterior changes.

The 1972 Chevrolet Camaro's clever front-end facelifting was accomplished by reducing the number of vertical grille bars, which produced a larger eggcrate pattern for a more aggressive look.

The split-grille RS (Rally Sport) front end stood pat. Otherwise, changes were few.

Three-point shoulder belts were installed for the first time, and at midyear, a "fasten seat belts" warning light was added.

Production slipped below 69,000 cars -- the lowest total ever -- partly due to a strike at the Norwood, Ohio, assembly plant. The biggest Camaro engine was the "396" (actually displacing 402 cubic inches), rated at 240 net horsepower, the measurement system now employed by all automakers.

Camaro Z28s used a 350-cubic-inch V-8 that developed 255 horsepower (net). Standard engines were the 110-horsepower 250-cubic-inch six and 130-horsepower 307-cubic-inch V-8, with a 200-horsepower 350 the only other option.

Just 4,824 Camaros had a six-cylinder engine while 63,832 came with one of the V-8 choices, including 2,575 Z28s. About 60,000 Camaros had power steering, and more than 84 percent had an automatic transmission.

1972 Chevrolet Camaro SS
The 1972 Camaro's SS package
produced 200 net horsepower.

1972 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,121-3,248 $2,730-$2,82068,656

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1973 Chevrolet Camaro

1973 Chevrolet Camaro
The 1973 Chevrolet Camaro moved away from
muscle to luxury with the LT coupe.

The 1973 Chevrolet Camaro lineup added a new Type LT (Luxury Touring) coupe, underscoring the move away from performance and toward luxury.

Essentially replacing the departed Super Sport, LT coupes carried a standard 145-horsepower version of the 350-cubic-inch V-8 engine.

Compared to a base price of $2,872 for the standard V-8 coupe, an LT listed at $3,268. But that extra $396 bought quite an appetizing assortment of goodies: variable-ratio power steering, black rocker panels and body accents, streamlined "sport" mirrors, Rally wheels, and a woodgrain dashboard.

The LT coupe also came with a full set of instruments, deluxe upholstery, and considerably more sound insulation.

A 175-horsepower variant of the 350 V-8 could be installed in either the base or LT coupe. Down at entry level, Camaros might have a 250-cid six or 307-cubic-inch V-8.

Chevrolet did a better job than most manufacturers in adapting the Camaro to meet new bumper-impact regulations.

Front and rear bumpers looked the same as before but were moved farther away from the body while being reinforced with brackets, braces, and an inner support bar.

Of the 96,751 Camaros produced in the 1973 model year, 11,574 were Z28s, an option that now cost only $598. Special Z28 features included front and rear spoilers, performance tires on five-spoke wheels, and contrasting stripes.

The Z28's 350-cubic-inch V-8, now running hydraulic lifters, lost 10 horsepower. Rated at a modest but still-lively 245 horsepower, the engine abandoned its costly high-rise aluminum intake manifold.

Turbo Hydra-Matic was now the only automatic available, and these were the first Z28s to offer optional air conditioning.

Because of meager sales totals early in the 1970s, GM executives seriously considered dropping both the Camaro and the closely re­lated Pontiac Firebird.

Each model earned a reprieve, mainly on the grounds that they had intrinsic value as "image cars" for the corporation, even if total sales continued to fall below the marketers' expectations.

1973 Chevrolet Camaro
Camaro bumpers met federal regulations
without altering the car's good looks.

1973 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,119-3,349 $2,781-$3,26896,751

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1974 Chevrolet Camaro

1974 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The Z28 performance version of the
Chevrolet Camaro would be gone after 1974.

The 1974 Chevrolet Camaro had large five-mph aluminum bumpers on both ends, to meet tigher government regulations. A sloping lattice-work grille decorated the facelifted Camaro's front end, gracefully integrated within the prow-like nose. The new front-end shape added about eight inches to overall length.

Wraparound taillights replaced the round units, as the rear end was altered to accommodate deeper bumpers. With a lithely shaped Camaro on sale, rival automakers could no longer blame Washington for clumsy "safety" styling.

This year's Z28 could get bold graphics on the hood, and power steering became standard, but its 350-cubic-inch V-8 was detuned a little more. Even so, it was no feeble performer, still rated at 245 horse­power and adding a "High-Energy" ignition system at mid-year. Because compliance with even-stricter emissions standards would be costly, Chevrolet dropped the Z28 after 1974.

Other Camaros might carry a 145-, 160-, or 185-horsepower version of the 350-cubic-inch V-8, but some still held a 100-horse six. Production included 13,802 Z28s out of a total 151,008 Camaros. The Type LT became more luxurious and more costly.

A total of 48,963 LT Camaros were built, priced $347 higher than the base V-8 sport coupe. All prices started to gallop, jumping almost $500 across the board.

1974 Chevrolet Camaro Facts

Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,309-3,566 $3,162-$3,713151,008

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1975 Chevrolet Camaro

1975 Chevrolet Camaro
The 1975 Chevrolet Camaro managed
only 155 horsepower in its highest form.

The 1975 Chevrolet Camaro boasted a new wraparound back window that let Camaro drivers see a little better toward the rear -- even if less vigor under the hood made it more difficult to stay ahead of the pack.

Chevrolet, in fact, explained that current Camaros were "designed to help keep you driving happy," even if you were driving more slowly, or less often. The new rear glass blended neatly into the original greenhouse lines.

No more Z28s went to dealerships, but a new Rally Sport edition -- with a blacked-out hood panel and bright, tri-color stripe graphics -- gave at least an impression of performance, if not the reality.

Top engine was a 155-horsepower, 350-cubic-inch V-8. All powerplants now exhaled through a catalytic converter to help control emissions. Finned rear brake drums were new, along with twin-exhaust mufflers on V-8s and High-Energy Ignition for all models.

For the first time, air conditioning was available on six-cylinder Camaros, and options included power door locks. Capitalizing on the Camaro's renewed popularity, Chevrolet revived the Rally Sport package as a $238 mid-season appearance option.

Sales approached the 150,000 level, giving Chevy's ponycar a firmer hold on its market niche. A total of 39,843 Type LT Camaros were built, versus 76,178 V-8 sport coupes and 29,749 with a six.

1975 Chevrolet Camaro Type LT
The Type LT did not have a rear spoiler used on base Camaros.

1975 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,421-3,616 $3,540-$4,057145,770

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1976 Chevrolet Camaro

1976 Chevrolet Camaro Type LT
The 1976 Chevrolet Camaro Type LT
was one of only two models that year.

The 1976 Chevrolet Camaro represented yet another season with little modification for the coupe in the wake of the '74 facelift.

Not that change was necessary, because shoppers were snapping them up with a passion unseen since the Sixties. Camaro model-year output soared to 182,959 in 1976, with the Type LT accounting for 52,421 sales.

Most styling changes occurred on the luxurious Type LT, which gained a textured vinyl (formerly woodgrained) instrument panel and a brushed-aluminum rear panel applique. A Rally Sport option group, which included bold two-tone paint on the roof, hood, and front fenders, could be ordered for either the basic Sport Coupe or the LT.

The RS package came in white, silver, light blue metallic, Firethorn metallic, or bright yellow. An LT Camaro listed for $4,320, versus $3,927 for the regular V-8 Sport Coupe.

Camaros could be ordered with the basic 105-horsepower six, a new 140-horsepower 305-cubic-inch V-8, or the top choice, a 350-cubic-inch V-8 that eked out 165 horses and cost $85 more than the 305. A three-speed floor shift was still the standard transmission.

The options list contained such items as Cruise-Master speed control, a sport suspension, rear defogger, front and rear spoilers, and tinted glass. This year's vinyl Sport roof covered only the front section.

1976 Chevrolet Camaro Type LT
Camaro sales rose by more than 35,000 in 1976.

1976 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,421-3,576 $3,762-$4,320182,959

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1977 Chevrolet Camaro

1977 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
Chevy brought back the Z28 performance
model on the 1977 Camaro.

The 1977 Chevrolet Camaro lineup resurrected the Z28 model in mid-season after two seasons without it. Chevrolet executives felt it was needed to rival the Pontiac Firebird Trans Am. Instead of straight-line action, though, the focus shifted to handling.

Rather than try to build a fire-breathing speed machine, Chevy created a true road car. Even so, engineers injected as much get-up-and-go as they could given the current state of emissions technology.

Enthusiasts cheered the revived Z28's debut at the Chicago Auto Show, despite a $5,170 price. The four-barrel, 350-cubic-inch V-8 shot a reasonably vigorous 185 horsepower toward Goodyear GR70x15 rubber.

Otherwise, changes were few, apart from new interior appointments. The Type LT offered bright new woven-cloth upholstery instead of the previous plaid material (vinyl continued as an alternative). Hidden wipers became standard for all models.

"Pure driving pleasure" was Chevrolet's promise to buyers of a Camaro, touted as "definitely a driver's car." Camaros again had a standard 110-horsepower 250-cubic-inch six-cylinder engine. The V-8 measured 305 cubic inches and delivered 145 horses.

Output set a record for the second-generation Camaro, with 218,853 coupes produced. And, Camaro outsold Ford's Mustang for the first time ever.

1977 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The Z28 had adequate power (185 horses)
but its strong suit was handling.

1977 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,369-3,422 $4,113-$5,170218,853

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1978 Chevrolet Camaro

1978 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
Styling changes identified the 1978
Chevrolet Camaro, including this Z28.

The 1978 Chevrolet Camaro featured a reworked nose -- in soft, resilient urethane -- that carried grille work above and below a body-colored bumper. At the rear, tri-color taillamps sat against a black or silver rear panel.

In addition to new "soft" fascias, the Z28 flaunted aggressively shaped front fender louvers and new optional aluminum wheels. "It's exciting, it's virile, it's a legend," said the brochure. No reason the car had to look puny, even if performance was no longer anything to shout about.

A total of 54,907 Z28s were built with a 185-horse, four-barrel upgrade of the 350 engine, list-priced at $5,604.

Ads promised that a Z28 would "put butterflies in your stomach, a lump in your throat and a smile on your face." Known primarily as "driver's cars," the late-Seventies Z-cars were no slouches when the pedal hit the floor, blasting to 60 mph in as little as 7.5 seconds.

Base Camaros were the most popular models, with more than 134,000 built, starting at $4,414. In between the base model and Z28, the line included a Rally Sport and a more popular Type LT (which cost only $30 more), plus a combination of Type LT and Rally Sport that stickered for $5,065.

Total Camaro output came to 272,631 cars. Engine choices included a 110-horsepower 250-cubic-inch six, 145-horsepower 305-cubic-inch V-8, and 170-horsepower 350-cubic-inch V-8.

1978 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
Tri-color taillamps against a black panel
highlighted the rear end changes.

1978 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,300-3,352 $4,414-$5,604272,631

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1979 Chevrolet Camaro

1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
The 1979 Chevrolet Camaro featured a
posh Berlinetta model for luxury buyers.

The 1979 Chevrolet Camaro lineup included a luxury-level Berlinetta, which replaced the Type LT and quickly turned into one highly popular Camaro. Chevrolet boasted of the Berlinetta's "new level of extraordinary road looks and a boulevard ride," with a suspension "engineered for relaxing comfort."

In addition to a distinctive grille and deluxe insulation to keep wind/road noise at bay, Berlinettas included custom-tuned engine mounts, revalved shocks, newly designed bucket seats in a Custom Cloth interior, dual body pinstriping, and aluminum wheels.

Top engine was a 175-horsepower 350-cubic-inch V-8, standard in the Z28 and optional in other Camaros. Base engines were the 250-cubic-inch six and 305-cubic-inch V-8. Production of the four models (base, Rally, Berlinetta, Z28) totaled 282,571 units, including a whopping 84,877 Z28 coupes -- more than the Berlinetta figure.

A base Camaro started at $5,163, while the "Z" brought $6,748. Rally Sport Camaros had a blackout grille, specially painted hood and roof, and Rally wheels.

"The Z28 makes waves," the brochure warned, and has "sleek road authority that causes talk and creates legends." Each Z28 had a simulated air scoop and front-fender louvers, a rear spoiler, new low-slung air dam, freshly flared front wheel openings -- plus a new instrument panel shared with other Camaros.

1979 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
The Berlinetta included body pinstriping and aluminum wheels.

1979 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,305-3,358 $5,163-$6,748282,571

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1980 Chevrolet Camaro

1980 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The top engine in the 1980 Chevrolet Camaro
produced 190 horsepower.

The 1980 Chevrolet Camaro opened the decade with few visual changes -- something that could be echoed for all the division's carryover cars.

But continually rising gas prices and Camaro's aging design triggered a staggering drop in sales, from almost 283,000 in 1979 to just over 152,000 for 1980 -- this despite a bevy of new and stronger powerplants.

As before, Camaro came in four versions: base, luxury-oriented Berlinetta, sporty RS, and even sportier Z28. Standard on all but the Z28 was a new 229-cubic-inch V-6 that replaced the old 250-cubic-inch inline six, both rated at the same 115 horsepower.

Other new offerings included a 231-cubic-inch Buick V-6 with 110 horsepower that substituted for the 229 V-6 in California, along with a downsized V-8 of 267 cubic inches and 120 horsepower.

Returning from '79 was a 305 V-8 that was revised to produce 155 horsepower, up from 130, while a stronger 350 now made 190 horsepower. The last was standard in the Z28, optional elsewhere.

But along with increased power came increased prices: up an average of $625, about 10 percent, across the board. The increase made Camaro significantly more expensive than its Ford Mustang rival, which had been redesigned for 1979.

Nevertheless, Chevy's sports coupe also offered significantly higher performance capabilities and thus continued to stand out as a strong survivor in the true ponycar tradition.

1980 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
Despite the modest power output,
the Camaro Z28 was rated at only 14 mpg.

1980 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,218-3,253 $5,843-$7,363152,005

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1981 Chevrolet Camaro

1981 Chevrolet Camaro
1981 was the final year for the
second-generation Camaro body style.

The 1981 Chevrolet Camaro was in its final season with this body style, and it once again looked nearly identical to previous editions. Dropped from the lineup was the slowest-selling model, the RS, but base, Berlinetta, and Z28 made the cut. Sales trailed off somewhat, but everyone knew a new design was coming for '82.

There were, however, some mechanical alterations. GM's Computer Command Control (CCC) emission system debuted, and automatic transmissions got a lock-up torque converter to eliminate slippage in high gear, a move intended to boost highway fuel economy.

Though engine choices didn't change, their power outputs did. Despite the new CCC system, nearly all ratings dropped a bit as a result of meeting ever-tightening emissions requirements. The base 49-state 229-cubic-inch V-6 lost 5 horses to 110, now the same as the California 231-cubic-inch Buick V-6.

Also down five ponies were the 267- and base 305-cubic-inch V-8s, now 115 and 150 horsepower, respectively.

New (and standard) for Z28s was a hotter 165-horsepower 305 that came with a four-speed manual transmission, while the top 350-cubic-inch V-8 slid to 175 horsepower (from 190) and came only with the three-speed automatic. This year, the top two engines were available only on Z28s.

1981 Chevrolet Camaro
With real power unavailable, Camaro buyers
opted for the luxurious Berlinetta.

1981 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,222-3,445 $6,780-$8,263126,139

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1982 Chevrolet Camaro

1982 Chevrolet Camaro
A crisp exterior styling for the 1982
Chevrolet Camaro was a dramatic departure.

The 1982 Chevrolet Camaro marked the arrival of the long-awaited third generation, boasting a three-door hatchback body style to replace the former two-door coupe.

As a sign of the times, it went on a strict diet: Average curb weights dropped by over 450 pounds as a result of losing seven inches of wheelbase, nearly 10 inches in length, and almost three inches in width. But contrary to contemporary trends, it remained rear-wheel drive and continued to offer V-8 power.

Like Camaros of old, there was precious little interior space considering the external dimensions -- which, though smaller, would easily classify it as a mid-size car. But Camaro's mission had always put form above function, and the new design upheld that tradition.

Lines were more angular than before, with a chiseled nose and chopped-off tail, but the Camaro maintained its long hood/short deck proportions.

Not all the changes were visual. Leaf springs gave way to coils in the rear, and MacPherson struts replaced the previous A-arm arrangement in front. Powertrain offerings were also altered, the reduction in curb weight allowing the availability of a four-cylinder engine in the Camaro for the first time.

This was Pontiac's 2.5-liter (151-cubic-inch) "Iron Duke" with throttle-body fuel injection, which was becoming a corporate mainstay.

Next up was the carbureted 2.8-liter (173-cubic-inch) V-6 that was likewise used in numerous GM cars, here producing 102 horsepower, 12 more than the four.

Two 5.0-liter (305-cubic-inch) V-8s were offered, one with four-barrel carburetion and 150 horsepower, the other with 165 horsepower courtesy of "Cross-Fire" injection, which consisted of two throttle-body injection units sitting across from one another.

Prices were predictably up, with the base model starting at $7,631 (+$851) and the top-line Z28 setting a buyer back at least $9,700 (+$1,437). But sales went up as well, from 126,000 to 182,000, though that paled in comparison to figures generated just three years earlier.

Chevy's ponycar still had an audience, but many potential buyers were defecting to smaller, more efficient sports coupes.

1982 Chevrolet Camaro
The pound-curve rear window was
an eye-opening styling innovation.

1982 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,870-2,940 $7,631-$9,700182,068

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1983 Chevrolet Camaro

1983 Chevrolet Camaro
Quality improved for the 1983 Camaro,
in its first full model year of a new design.

The 1983 Chevrolet Camaro, coming on the heels of a complete makeover in '82, offered two new transmissions and more power for some engines but saw only minor changes otherwise.

In an effort to increase performance and fuel economy, a five-speed manual transmission was added to the options list for the base Sport Coupe with the 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and made standard with the 2.8-liter V-6 and carbureted 5.0-liter V-8.

Standard with the Cross-Fire Injected 5.0-liter V-8 was a new four-speed automatic with lockup torque converter -- the only transmission offered with that engine.

The four-speed automatic was optional with all other engines, and a three-speed automatic was optional with the four or the V-6.

Like other U.S. manufacturers, Chevrolet was finally learning to cope with the government's emissions regulations. Horsepower went up by two on the 2.5-liter four to 92, 10 on the 2.8-liter V-6, now 112, and 15 on the top 5.0-liter Cross-Fire Injected V-8 (optional only on the Z28), now a rousing 180.

The base carbureted 5.0 V-8 stayed the same at 150. At midyear, a High Output (H.O.) version of the carbureted 5.0-liter V-8 was introduced, raising the ante to 190 horsepower -- 10 more than the Cross-Fire Injected engine, which it would later replace.

1983 Chevrolet Camaro
The 1983 Z28 offered reasonably aggressive performance.

1983 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,944-3,136 $8,036-$10,336153,831

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1984 Chevrolet Camaro

1984 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta
The tame but luxurious 1984 Berlinetta was heavy with gadgets.

The 1984 Chevrolet Camaro's most newsworthy change came in the form of a new dashboard for the Berlinetta model that boasted more "gee-whiz" electronic gadgetry than a fighter jet.

It had digital readouts for vehicle and engine speeds, plus a bar graph tachometer, warning lights for fluid levels, and needle gauges for fuel, temperature, oil pressure, and voltage.

Dual adjustable control pods flanked the main instrument cluster, and their positioning could be adjusted to suit the driver's reach. Cruise control buttons were mounted on the steering wheel, and an overhead console contained map lights and a storage pouch.

In mid-1983, a High-Output (H.O.) 190-horsepower carbureted 5.0-liter V-8 was added to the Z28's options list, offering 10 more horsepower than the Cross-Fire Injected version. The latter was dropped altogether for '84.

Whereas the Cross-Fire engine came only with a four-speed automatic transmission, the H.O. could be paired with a five-speed manual, further increasing the Z28's performance potential.

Prices didn't go up much but sales did, rising nearly 70 percent to an impressive 261,000. Oddly enough, base coupes and the Z28 sported the biggest gains, while the Berlinetta -- with its flashy new dash -- showed only a modest increase.

1984 Chevrolet Camaro
The Z28 could do zero to 60 mph in 7.2 seconds.

1984 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,899-3,135 $7,995-$12,270261,108

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1985 Chevrolet Camaro

1985 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z
The IROC-Z, new for the 1985 Camaro,
was officially an option package on the Z2.

The 1985 Chevrolet Camaro lineup added a new top-line sports model, and some engines enjoyed a horsepower boost. Otherwise, Camaro returned with few changes after a very successful 1984 selling season.

The vaunted Z28 was superseded as the top performance offering by the IROC-Z, which got its name from the specially prepared Camaros used in the International Race of Champions racing series.

In addition to a stiffer suspension and special wheels and tires, the IROC had exclusive use of the L69 190-horsepower carbureted 5.0-liter V-8 that came only with a five-speed manual transmission.

Optional on the IROC was a 215-horsepower Tuned Port Injected 5.0-liter V-8, which came only with a four-speed automatic. The latter was optional on the Z28, which came standard with a 165-horsepower version of the 5.0-liter V-8 that was optional on lesser Camaros.

Other engines included a 135-horsepower 2.8-liter V-6 (standard in the Berlinetta) and the base 2.5-liter four with 88 horsepower.

The Berlinetta's "video game" dash still drew some barbs, but overall, the Camaro -- at least in hotter Z28 or IROC-Z form -- was applauded as a bargain among high-performance sports coupes.

Sales reflected this view: Though lower than the year before, nearly 180,000 units were nothing to sneeze at, even at Chevrolet.

1985 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z
The IROC-Z had 16-inch aluminum wheels
and beefier tires, among other upgrades.


1985 Chevrolet Camaro Facts

Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,881-3,319 $8,363-$11,739 179,814

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1986 Chevrolet Camaro

1986 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z
The 1986 IROC-Z was a potent performer,
but style also counted to buyers.

The 1986 Chevrolet Camaro got a few sportier touches on the base model, which proved, once again, to be the most popular. Added were a sport suspension, wider 14-inch tires on styled steel wheels, and sport exhaust system.

It still came standard with the 88-horsepower 2.5-liter four, but few Camaro buyers settled for the base engine. Those ordering either the 135-horsepower 2.8-liter V-6 or 155-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8 automatically got 15-inch wheels and a firmer suspension.

Traditionally the slowest-selling Camaro, the ritzy Berlinetta got only new interior trim -- which predictably failed to spark sales. Conversely, the performance-oriented Z28 and its brawnier IROC-Z stablemate were enjoying near-record popularity.

They were the only two models to offer the H.O. 5.0-liter V-8 with 190 horsepower (coupled only to a four-speed manual transmission) and the port-fuel-injected 5.0 with 215 horsepower (offered only with four-speed automatic).

With performance making a comeback from the dark days of yore, Camaro sales continued strong. Despite a design that had changed little since '82, Chevy's rear-drive sports coupe racked up better than 192,000 orders, an impressive showing for such a specialized automobile.

1986 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z interior
Interiors on the IROC-Z and other Camaros
were functional but appliance-like.

1986 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 2,900-3,278 $8,935-$12,561192,128

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1987 Chevrolet Camaro

1987 Chevrolet Camaro convertible
Convertibles made a comeback in the 1980s;
Camaro caught the trend in 1987.

The 1987 Chevrolet Camaro didn't look much different than before, but it received some significant mechanical changes and at midyear welcomed an old friend back to the line.

Gone from the powertrain lineup was the unpopular 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine previously offered as standard equipment on the base model; now the standard engine was the 135-horsepower 2.8-liter V-6. It also powered the new LT, which replaced the Berlinetta.

Returning as standard in the Z28 and optional on base and LT was a 165-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8. The Z28's optional high-output 190-horsepower carbureted 5.0-liter that previously came only with a manual transmission was replaced by the port-fuel-injected 215-horsepower 5.0 -- which this year came not only with the four-speed automatic but also with the five-speed manual.

Topping the engine list and available only in the IROC-Z was the Corvette's 5.7-liter V-8 pumping out 225 horsepower and offered only with automatic.

But the big news came with the reincarnation of the Camaro convertible at midyear, absent since the second-generation design debuted for 1970. The ragtop exacted a stiff cost penalty, about $4,500, but the 1,007 lucky folks who got one didn't seem to mind.

1987 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The Z28 could be ordered with a 215-horsepower, 5.0-liter V-8.

1987 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,062-3,228 $9,995-$17,1917137,760 (approx.)

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1988 Chevrolet Camaro

1988 Chevrolet Camaro
Base 1988 Chevrolet Camaros had
many items previously offered on the Z28.

The 1988 Chevrolet Camaro lineup included only two entries: the base sport coupe and the IROC-Z. Previously an option package on the Z28, the IROC-Z became a model in its own right for 1988; also gone were the LT options packages for the base car, so buyers were faced with fewer choices.

But several of the Z28's styling features were transferred to the base Camaro, making it much racier looking; lower-body side panels, rear spoiler, body-colored mirrors, and aluminum wheels all became standard.

It still came with a 135-horsepower 2.8-liter V-6, but buyers could put some dash behind the flash by ordering the optional 5.0-liter throttle-body-injected V-8 that packed 170 horsepower, five more than the previous year's carbureted version. Both engines could be mated to a five-speed manual or four-speed automatic transmission.

The same 170-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8 was standard in the IROC-Z, but two brawnier V-8s were optional. First up was a port-injected version boasting 220 horsepower when paired with the standard five-speed manual, or 195 with the optional four-speed automatic. Top fire-breather was the Corvette's 230-horsepower 5.7-liter V-8, but it came only with the automatic.

1988 Chevrolet Camaro
Many base models were sold with the
optional 170-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8.

1988 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,054-3,352 $10,995-$18,01596,275

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1989 Chevrolet Camaro

1989 Chevrolet Camaro
The IROC-Z was again the top of the line
for the 1989 Chevrolet Camaro.

The 1989 Chevrolet Camaro base model was renamed RS, giving it a sportier moniker if not a sportier demeanor. And because Camaros had become popular with thieves, topping the charts in some years, the Corvette's Pass-Key theft-deterrent system became standard for 1989.

Powertrain offerings stayed the same as in '88. Standard on the RS coupe was the good ol' 2.8-liter V-6 still belting out 135 horsepower. Standard on the RS convertible and optional on the coupe was again a 170-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8.

That same engine was standard on the IROC-Z as well, but the IROC also offered two optional V-8s: a port-fuel-injected 5.0-liter with 220 horsepower and a 5.7-liter with 230 horsepower. All could be mated to either a five-speed manual or four-speed automatic except the last, which came only with the automatic.

Though little had changed, the cost of a Camaro went up by $500-$930, meaning that the price of entry now stood at $11,495. Surprisingly, that didn't hurt sales, which grew from 1988's disappointing 96,275 to a slightly less depressing 110,739.

But the Camaro was now being soundly whipped by the rival Mustang (which was out-selling it by about two to one), and a more modern replacement was a good four years away.

1989 Chevrolet Camaro
Base RS Camaros had the familiar
punishing ride and poor visibility.

1989 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,082-3,285 $11,495-$18,945110,739

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1990 Chevrolet Camaro

1990 Chevrolet Camaro
The IROC-Z version of the Chevrolet Camaro
was in its last year in 1990.

Though the 1990 Chevrolet Camaro looked little different outside, there were some notable changes to the interior. Foremost among them was the addition of a driver-side air bag, but the new leather seating option was also newsworthy.

Somewhat less exciting was a switch to yellow instrument-panel graphics and the application of Scotchgard-brand fabric protector. The same two models were again offered, base RS and performance-oriented IROC-Z, and both continued to be available in either coupe or convertible form.

Replacing the 2.8-liter V-6 as standard power was an enlarged 3.1-liter version. Horsepower grew by only five to 140, but torque increased a useful 20 pound-feet to 180. Otherwise, the engine charts were a rerun.

Standard on the IROC and RS convertible, and optional on the RS coupe, was a 170-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8. Optional on the IROC was a 220-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8, as well as a 230-horsepower 5.7-liter V-8. All but the last could be ordered with either a five-speed manual or four-speed automatic transmission; the 5.7 came only with the automatic.

Production only reached about a third of the 1989 figure, totaling a mere 34,986. Convertibles were particularly rare, with only 1,294 IROCs and 729 RSs built. But much of this was due to the fact that the '91 Camaros were introduced in the spring of 1990, cutting short the 1990 model year.

1990 Chevrolet Camaro RS
All Camaros, including the base RS,
got tinted glass for 1990.

1990 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,107-3,348 $10,995-$20,19534,986

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  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
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  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1991 Chevrolet Camaro

1991 Chevrolet Camaro
All 1991 Chevrolet Camaros had new front and rear fascias.

The 1991 Chevrolet Camaro resurrected the Z28 moniker for the high-performance version of the Camaro, having dropped its sponsorship of the IROC racing series and thus losing the right to use the acronym on its cars.

Since the race season started in the spring, Chevy brought out the '91 Camaro line early, in March of 1990.

Aside from the name change, the Camaro saw few mechanical revisions but did get some cosmetic updates. Both the RS and Z28 got new aero rocker moldings along with revised front and rear fascias. Z28s added restyled 16-inch alloy wheels, nonfunctional hood bulges, and a prominent rear spoiler.

RS coupes again came standard with a 140-horsepower 3.1-liter V-6. Standard on RS convertibles and optional on RS coupes was a 170-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8. Z28s now came standard with a 230-horsepower port-fuel-injected 5.0-liter V-8, while an optional 245-horse­power 5.7-liter V-8 was offered on Z28 coupes.

All engines were available with a five-speed manual transmission or four-speed automatic, except for the top 5.7-liter V-8, which came only with the automatic.

Camaro prices skyrocketed during 1991, which might help explain why production barely topped 100,000 for this extra-long model year.

1991 Chevrolet Camaro
Even with a 140-horsepower V-6,
the Camaro was reasonably peppy.

1991 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,103-3,400 $12,180-$20,815100,838

For more picture-packed articles about Chevys and other great cars, see:

  • Classic Cars: Learn about more than 400 of the world's finest classic and collectible automobiles.
  • Muscle Cars: Look back at tire-smoking Chevys and scores of other machines from the golden age of American high performance.
  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
  • Consumer Guide Automotive: Here's your source for news, reviews, prices, fuel-economy, and safety information on today's cars, minivans, SUVs, and pickups.
  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1992 Chevrolet Camaro

1992 Chevrolet Camaro
With a redesign due the next year,
sales of the 1992 Chevrolet Camaro were low.

The 1992 Chevrolet Camaro, in the final year of the car's third generation, marked its 25th anniversary with a Heritage Appearance option but otherwise continued with few changes.

Available in coupe or convertible form, the commemorative edition options package included a body-colored grille, black headlight pockets, hood and trunklid stripes, and special badging -- all for a mere $175. Cars with the Heritage Appearance package were available only in red, white, or black.

RS and Z28 models were again offered in both coupe and convertible form. Standard on RS Camaros was a 3.1-liter V-6 with port fuel injection and 140 horsepower, while a 5.0-liter V-8 with throttle-body injection and 170 horsepower was optional. Z28s came with a port fuel injected 5.0-liter V-8 that made 230 horsepower.

Optional on Z28 coupes only was a 245-horsepower 5.7-liter V-8, which was available only with a four-speed automatic; all other engines could be mated to either the automatic or a five-speed manual. New Z28 features in­cluded 16-inch alloy wheels to replace 15s, faster-ratio power steering, and a handling suspension.

With a heavily revised Camaro waiting in the wings for 1993, it's no surprise that sales plummeted in '92. Total production amounted to just over 70,000 units, the third-generation Camaro's worst full-year showing.

1992 Chevrolet Camaro
The convertible was available
on the Z28 (shown) or base RS model.

1992 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,103-3,400 $12,075-$21,50070,008

For more picture-packed articles about Chevys and other great cars, see:

  • Classic Cars: Learn about more than 400 of the world's finest classic and collectible automobiles.
  • Muscle Cars: Look back at tire-smoking Chevys and scores of other machines from the golden age of American high performance.
  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
  • Consumer Guide Automotive: Here's your source for news, reviews, prices, fuel-economy, and safety information on today's cars, minivans, SUVs, and pickups.
  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1993 Chevrolet Camaro

1993 Chevrolet Camaro
A fabulous redesign and more power
highlighted the 1993 Chevrolet Camaro.

The 1993 Chevrolet Camaro wore a completely new design for the first time in more than a decade.

The previous generation's sharp body creases were smoothed out, but many of the styling elements of the rear-drive sports coupe were carried over; there was no mistaking this new fourth-generation for anything but a Camaro.

Only a coupe was offered at first, a convertible promised for later. The base coupe dropped its RS nomenclature, but the Z28 continued as the high-performance variant.

Though the '93 Camaro rode the same 101-inch wheelbase as the '92 model, there were many changes beneath its sleek skin. In front, a new short/long-arm coil spring suspension substituted for MacPherson struts, while the rear continued with a multi-link solid axle and coil springs.

Spring rates were markedly softer for a better ride, but the new Camaro handled just as well as the old. And whether in base or Z28 form, it boasted more power.

Each version came with only one engine. Base models got a new 3.4-liter V-6 that produced 160 horsepower, 20 more than the previous 3.1-liter V-6. Z28s were fitted with a slightly detuned version of the Corvette's LT1 5.7-liter V-8, which in this application belted out 275 horsepower (versus 300 in the 'Vette).

A five-speed manual was standard with the V-6, while a new six-speed manual came with the V-8. A four-speed automatic was optional with both engines.

1993 Chevrolet Camaro
The base Camaro produced 160 horsepower
from its 3.4-liter V-6.

1993 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,247-3,436 $13,399-$16,79940,224

For more picture-packed articles about Chevys and other great cars, see:

  • Classic Cars: Learn about more than 400 of the world's finest classic and collectible automobiles.
  • Muscle Cars: Look back at tire-smoking Chevys and scores of other machines from the golden age of American high performance.
  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
  • Consumer Guide Automotive: Here's your source for news, reviews, prices, fuel-economy, and safety information on today's cars, minivans, SUVs, and pickups.
  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1994 Chevrolet Camaro

1994 Chevrolet Camaro
Camaro resurrected the convertible for 1994
after a one-year absence.

The biggest news for the 1994 Chevrolet Camaro was that it was no longer strictly a sports coupe, as a new convertible was added at midyear. Camaro's Firebird cousin also got a droptop, but it didn't appear until late spring.

Base and Z28 versions of the Camaro returned, both offering coupe and convertible models. Convertibles came standard with a power top and glass rear window, the latter of which allowed for a rear defroster -- a nicety many ragtops lacked. Meanwhile, Removable Roof Panels, more commonly known as T-tops, also made a comeback after a one-year absence.

Engine choices remained the same. Base models got a 160-horsepower 3.4-liter V-6, which ran on regular fuel, while Z28s had a 275-horsepower 5.7-liter LT1 V-8 that demanded premium. As before, the base Camaro with its V-6 came standard with a five-speed manual transmission, offering a four-speed automatic as an option.

But in an effort to increase performance while remaining above the government's gas-guzzler limits, Z28s now came standard with the Corvette's CAGS (Computer-Aided Gear Selection) six-speed manual mated to a shorter 3.42:1 axle ratio.

The latter gave better off-the-line punch than the previous 2.73 and 3.23 rear ends, but many enthusiasts bemoaned the adoption of the CAGS transmission with its forced first-to-fourth-gear shift under light throttle. Those who really disliked it, however, could still opt for the four-speed automatic.

Announced at the beginning of the year was the addition of traction control as a midyear option on Z28s with automatic transmission. It would be Corvette's ASR (Acceleration Slip Regulation) system, which could be turned off by a dashboard button. But it didn't arrive at midyear, nor even by the end of the year; in fact, it wouldn't be offered until late in the 1995 model run.

1994 Chevrolet Camaro Z28
The Z28 performance model offered a snarly 275 horses.

1994 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,247-3,524 $13,499-$22,075125,244

For more picture-packed articles about Chevys and other great cars, see:

  • Classic Cars: Learn about more than 400 of the world's finest classic and collectible automobiles.
  • Muscle Cars: Look back at tire-smoking Chevys and scores of other machines from the golden age of American high performance.
  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
  • Consumer Guide Automotive: Here's your source for news, reviews, prices, fuel-economy, and safety information on today's cars, minivans, SUVs, and pickups.
  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1995 Chevrolet Camaro

1995 Chevrolet Camaro
The convertible option was available
on the base (shown) or Z28 Camaro.

The 1995 Chevrolet Camaro gained some powertrain options, along with minor cosmetic alterations. Base models got an optional V-6 that could be ordered in place of the standard 160-horsepower 3.4 liter.

It was similar to the Series II 3.8-liter V-6s that could be found in several of GM's large front-drive models, here tuned to produce 200 horsepower. Whereas the 3.4 came standard with a five-speed manual and offered a four-speed automatic as an option, the 3.8 came only with the automatic.

Z28s returned with their 275-horsepower 5.7-liter V-8, available with the CAGS (Computer-Aided Gear Selection) six-speed manual or four-speed automatic. After being announced for 1994 but never offered, traction control finally made the options list in '95.

Available on Z28s only, it was the same Acceleration Slip Regulation (ASR) system that had been standard on Corvettes since '92, and could likewise be turned off by a dashboard switch should tire spin be desired.

Appearance-wise, Z28s and base coupes with optional T-tops got a black-painted roof, though body-colored roof and mirrors were now a no-charge option. Base models also gained optional chrome wheel covers late in the model year.

1995 Chevrolet Camaro
The base Camaro did not get the
traction control system available on the Z28.

1995 Chevrolet Camaro Facts

Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,251-3,480 $14,250-$23,095NA

For more picture-packed articles about Chevys and other great cars, see:

  • Classic Cars: Learn about more than 400 of the world's finest classic and collectible automobiles.
  • Muscle Cars: Look back at tire-smoking Chevys and scores of other machines from the golden age of American high performance.
  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
  • Consumer Guide Automotive: Here's your source for news, reviews, prices, fuel-economy, and safety information on today's cars, minivans, SUVs, and pickups.
  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.

1996 Chevrolet Camaro

1996 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 SS
The Chevrolet Camaro Z28 SS got
more power for 1996, as did the base model.

The 1996 Chevrolet Camaro, in its third year since being redesigned, picked up more power and numerous refinements for 1996.

The biggest change occurred under the hoods of base models. Replacing the formerly standard 160-horsepower 3.4-liter V-6 was the 200-horsepower 3.8-liter V-6 added as an option late in the 1995 model year. For '96, however, it was available with either a five-speed manual or a four-speed automatic, the latter being the only transmission offered previously.

Further elevating the base model's capabilities was a new Performance Handling Package that included a limited-slip differential, four-wheel disc brakes, dual exhaust outlets, and faster steering ratio. A sporty appearance package was also introduced.

Carrying the RS designation used on previous-generation Camaros, it consisted of lower front and rear fascia extensions, rocker-panel moldings, and a three-piece rear spoiler. New 16-inch chromed aluminum wheels, available on both base models and Z28s, could be ordered to further dress up a '96 Camaro.

Z28s also gained more power, their 5.7-liter V-8 being boosted from 275 to 285 horsepower. They also got a new low-coolant-level indicator. As before, a CAGS (Computer-Aided Gear Selection) six-speed manual transmission was standard, with a four-speed automatic optional. Whether mated to the V-6 or the V-8, the automatic gained a second-gear-start mode for use on slippery surfaces.

1996 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 SS
The fourth-generation Camaro received
numerous refinements for 1996.

1996 Chevrolet Camaro Facts
Model Weight range (lbs.) Price range (new)
Number built
Camaro 3,306-3,593 $14,990-$24,490NA

For more picture-packed articles about Chevys and other great cars, see:

  • Classic Cars: Learn about more than 400 of the world's finest classic and collectible automobiles.
  • Muscle Cars: Look back at tire-smoking Chevys and scores of other machines from the golden age of American high performance.
  • Sports Cars: Discover the pleasure of sports motoring at its purest in these captivating articles on the best sports cars from around the world.
  • Consumer Guide Automotive: Here's your source for news, reviews, prices, fuel-economy, and safety information on today's cars, minivans, SUVs, and pickups.
  • All Chevrolet Camaros: From the original 1967 to the last-of-a-breed 2002 model, learn all about one of America's favorite sporty cars.