Watching Roadside Diversions

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Watching Roadside Diversions

While your attention is focused on that toned hardbody strutting along the sidewalk, there's plenty of time for a cell phone-occupied driver to cut in front of you without looking.

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Billboards are now animated and practically dare you to try not looking at them. Elsewhere, the hazard might be roadside bombshells -- like if you happen to be cruising through South Beach.

We humans are hardwired to notice the extraordinary. In our earliest days, the unusual could have represented an animal that wanted us for lunch or even a potential mate from another tribe who could diversify the genes of our offspring. One big difference between now and then was that we didn't have the ability to hurtle ourselves across the landscape faster than even a cheetah.

At 55 miles per hour (88.5 kilometers per hour), a car can cover half the length of a football field in about 4 seconds. So while your attention is focused on that toned hardbody strutting along the sidewalk, there's plenty of time for a cell phone-occupied driver to cut in front of you without looking.

While, arguably, our ancient hardwiring makes women better-suited to vehicular multitasking in the modern era, it's dangerous to divide your attention (hence your reaction time) among multiple activities behind the wheel, no matter what your gender.

One of the best -- or perhaps worst -- examples of this is our next distracted driving habit. It's guaranteed to push your buttons, so click to the next page to find out more.

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