NASCAR Racing

NASCAR racing has gained worldwide popularity in last decade. NASCAR racing requires a mastery of certain driving techniques plus a knowledgable race team to keep the car running in peak form.


Without a doubt, the Daytona 500 has the most unique qualifying format in the entire NASCAR season. What makes qualifying so unusual? How does a driver make it onto the starting grid for the race?

Telemetry is the remote collection and measurement of data. It usually involves some sort of wireless broadcast. Of course, remote data collection is important in many fields -- defense, medicine, even agriculture.

Aerodynamics is the study of how air moves, and it's a crucial element in stock car design. But it has changed car racing in ways some fans find infuriating.

Stock car drivers are the ones who get all the attention after a big win, but kudos also need to go to the team working behind the scenes on the car's suspension.

While many successful car corporations were experimenting with aerodynamics in the 1960s, the "aero war" itself usually refers to the two biggest companies, Ford and Chrysler.

Ever hear the saying that the game of life is won by inches? That's certainly true in stock car racing, when -- despite vehicle speeds that can exceed 200 miles (330 k) per hour -- mere inches are all that separate the winners from the losers.

Imagine soaring down the road in your Chevy Impala SS, leaning heavy into the turns. You're nearing 200 mph now -- as fast as your car will go. Then, zoom, zoom, zoom! This is stock car racing, and you've just been lapped at the final flag.

From the basic black of the Model- T to the brown and orange of the Home Depot runner, cars of all purposes have always had some sort of paint job. But NASCAR cars take color a little bit further than your own ride. Find out why.

NASCAR's a household name. The drivers are as famous as any other category of professional athlete. It's probably the thrill of speed. How can the drivers go so fast? It's not just the driving.

On any given weekend throughout most of the year, almost 800 dirt tracks come to life across America. Tickets are bought, prize money is won, autographs are signed and damaged cars are hauled away by wreckers.

NASCAR engines are known for their power, but a successful NASCAR engine also has to be reliable. The world's best engineers spend enormous amounts of money, time, and energy to build such powerful machines.

NASCAR in-car cameras have provided fans a sneak peek into the racing experience for decades. As simple as the cameras are, however, everything about them -- from the technology used to make them to deciding who gets one - - is decidedly complex.

You don't like driving in the rain, so imagine the difficulties that a NASCAR driver faces racing at triple-digit speeds with no windshield wipers. In fact, NASCAR usually cancels races in wet conditions for safety reasons.

Ever wondered why NASCAR drivers sometimes weave their cars from side to side for several laps during races? They're trying get rid of marbles, little balls of rubber tire detritus that can prove dangerous to drivers.

NASCAR racing has changed since the days of street-legal cars driving on dirt tracks. Today's teams have budgets of $20 million or more. Just how much of that is spent on cars?

We see it so often -- the winner of a race holds an oversized million-dollar check high in the air in victory lane. But where does all of this prize money come from, anyway?

If you're a fan of NASCAR racing, then you've probably heard about the draft. But what's really happening out there on the track? And why do some drivers claim to "see the air?"

For NASCAR inspectors, race day begins long before the first fans arrive -- and they typically don't get to go home the moment the race is over, either. So what are these guys up to?

NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow is loaded with improved safety features designed to keep the driver safe during high-speed impacts. Sounds great, right? Well then why are so many NASCAR drivers and fans resisting the change?

Considering the volatility of gas prices these days, hypermiling seems like a sensible way to drive. Who knew it was so easy to double your gas mileage?

A loose or tight NASCAR race is something that drivers and crew chiefs need to correct quickly. The problem is due to oversteering and understeering the race car and can cost drivers valuable time -- and easily lead to crashes.

In the early days of NASCAR, there were few rules for teams to follow. Because of this, drivers pushed the envelope and tried every trick in the book. Now, there are more rules, but is it still easy to cheat?

NASCAR fans might end race day either in a celebratory mood or completely dejected. And those feelings might have nothing to do with what happened out on the actual track. So what could cause fans to lose their cool even before a race begins?

It's a serious thing when the rubber meets the road. That's why routine wheel alignments are so important to a car's performance. But how could camber play such a big role in NASCAR races?

Fans of NASCAR know that corporate sponsorship logos are everywhere -- on the cars, on the drivers and a variety of other odd places, too. But do you know how much a NASCAR sponsorship costs?