Auto Parts and Systems

Auto parts and systems are the building blocks that come together to make automobiles function. Understanding how auto parts work together to form automotive systems allows drivers to confidently discuss automotive problems with their mechanics.


Most people can feel their brakes as they wear, and they know when it's time to get new ones. But what if there's a leak in your brake line or someone cuts the line altogether?

Cars with an automatic transmission have no clutch that disconnects the transmission from the engine. Instead, they use an amazing device called a torque converter. Find out all about the torque converter.

You find references to force, power, torque and energy all over the HowStuffWorks site. Learn what these terms really mean and how they relate to one another.

Stopping a car in a hurry on a slippery road can be challenging at best and at worst very scary. Anti-lock braking systems (ABS) help alleviate the danger. Learn how anti-lock brakes prevent skidding, check out what that sputtering is, and find out h

If you've ever opened the hood of your car, you've probably seen the brake booster. It's the round, black cannister located at the back of the engine compartment on the driver's side of the car. In this article, we'll see what's inside the black can

Disc brakes are the most common brakes found on a car's front wheels, and they're often on all four. This is the part of the brake system that does the actual work of stopping the car. Find out all about disc brakes.

The next time your mechanic tells you your brakes need repairing, know exactly what he's talking about. Learn how a drum brake system works, examine the emergency brake setup and find out what kind of servicing drum brakes need.

The master cylinder provides the pressure that engages your car brakes. Learn how the master cylinder works with the combination valve to make sure you can brake safely.

We all know that pushing down the brake pedal slows a car to a stop. But how does your car transmit the energy from your leg to its wheels? How does it multiply that force so that it is enough to stop something as big as a car?