Born to do battle with Mustang, Camaro fought the good fight. Thirty-five years later Chevy says goodnight to its legendary ponycar with the best "'Maro" yet, the 2002 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro SS.

2002 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro SS
The sleek lines of the 2002 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro SS
bring to mind Camaro's early days while keeping with modern style.
See more pictures of the Chevrolet Camaro.

For 2002 Chevy bid farewell to Camaro with a special 35th Anniversary edition available only on SS-package-equipped Z28s. On top of the SS's 325-horsepower Corvette-derived V-8, anniversary editions added exclusive hood, roof and rear-deck striping, 35th Anniversary badging, and a hot-rod inspired painted rear differential.

It was a fitting finish to one of America's proudest nameplates. Camaro was born in the late 1960s out of Chevrolet's desperate need for something sporty and youthful to battle Ford's successful Mustang. With the much-maligned, rear-engine Corvair on the way out, General Motors design chief Bill Mitchell oversaw development of a more conventional replacement. From its 1967 debut, Camaro had the long-hood, short-tail look that would define the line for almost four decades.

2002 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro SS, Engine
The 2002 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro SS comes with a
Corvette-derived V-8, adding under-the-hood muscle to back up its slick exterior.

Like Mustang, Camaro was initially offered in versions ranging from 6-cylinder basic to V-8 e­xciting. Equipped with the standard 140-horsepower engine, the $2466 base Camaro provided stylish transportation on a budget. Buyers looking for more excitement could opt for the Super Sport, or SS, edition with V-8s ranging from 295 to 375 horsepower. Nineteen sixty-seven also gave birth to the Z28, a race-ready Camaro based on the car that won 18 out of 25 Trans-Am races that year.

A convertible was part of Camaro's magic right from the start, and usually was available with even the most-powerful engines and in both SS and Z28 trim. Camaro's convertible disappeared from the line in 1970, and didn't appear again until 1987. The ragtop would remain a part of the Camaro lineup until the end, skipping only 1993.

Of 3000 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Camaro SSs built, just 1398 were convertibles, assuring that this last of the breed would also become one of the most coveted.

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