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1969 AMX/2 Concept Car and 1970 AMX/3


1970 AMX/3 Legacy
Taken during the Rome press preview, this publicity photo shows what appears to be the number-three AMX/3 later owned by designer Dick Teague.
Taken during the Rome press preview, this publicity photo shows what appears to be the number-three AMX/3 later owned by designer Dick Teague.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

The 1970 AMX/3 legacy lives on in the surviving prototypes. Number-one wound up in the Gilmore Museum in Kalamazoo, Michigan; numbers two and four in the Indianapolis area.

Designer Dick Teague owned numbers three and five. Most of his collector cars were sold after his death. The final AMX/3 was completed sometime later (likely during 1971) at the behest of a business friend of Bizzarrini's.

Dick Teague's initial design ideas survived to final form with virtually no alteration, though wheels and other details differed among the six cars ultimately built. For example, number-six was the only AMX/3 with concealed wipers and three extra inches of rear overhang.

Number-six's Italian businessman-owner saw to the cutting-up of two unused bodies, which later prompted Teague to speculate that a couple more examples might surface someday.

That, alas, seems unlikely, but at least we have the six AMX/3s to inspire thoughts of this grand midships turismo that might have been. For us, they will also ever inspire memories of the good friend we lost in Dick Teague, one of the great unsung talents of the design business. It says much about this man that he could always laugh at mistakes like the late-1970s Pacer as graciously as he accepted praise for brilliant successes.

The AMX/3 was proposed as a limited-edition $10,000 replacement for the rather conventional AMC Javelin pony car. But just six AMX/3s were built.
The AMX/3 was proposed as a limited-edition $10,000 replacement for the rather conventional AMC Javelin pony car. But just six AMX/3s were built.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

The AMX/3 was definitely Dick Teague's kind of modern automobile, and his enthusiasm showed in every line. As unquestionably his finest work, it's the one we should remember him by as both car designer and enthusiastic "car nut." He would want it that way. He deserves no less.

For more on concept cars and the production models they forecast, check out:


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