1959, 1960 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham

The 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham 365 V-8, which retained Tri-Power carburetion, was stroked to 390 cid, and with its higher 10.5:1 compression ratio developed 345 horsepower at 4,800 rpm. This same powerplant was carried over for the 1960 models. Air suspension was likewise continued, but wasn't exactly the same as in 1957-1958 due to revised air-spring bellows and domes and a constant-supply air pump rather than an on-demand unit.

Interiors, by comparison with the 1957-1958 Broughams, appeared more conventionally Cadillac. Gone were the silver cups in the glove compartment, the perfume bottles, the many vanities, and the digital clock. Still, these second-generation Eldorado Broughams carried a magazine rack in back and lockable compartments on the rear package shelf. There were dozens of Brougham trim touches, including veneer panels and a rear dock shared with limos. Interior upholstery choices were down from 44 to 15. As in 1957-1958, carpeting was either Mouton or Karakul. Lambskin was out.

1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.
An early rendering of the Pinin Farina-built 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham.

In a further effort to cut production costs, the project was turned over to the Pinin Farina factory in Turin, Italy, which produced 99 cars in 1959 and 101 in 1960. All were virtually hand built, one reason the bodies had so much leading (much to the bane of restorers later). Surprisingly, the cars didn't wear Pinin Farina badges.

That's apparently because Cadillac did the design work; cars wearing the Pinin Farina tag were generally designed as well as built by that world-famous Italian firm. In contrast, the 1987-1993 Cadillac Allanté did carry Pininfarina badging (one word beginning in 1961) because that's who helped design it. In any case, the 1959-1960 Eldorado Broughams carried only the Fleetwood name on the doorsill moldings.

There were some styling changes for 1960. These included the 1960 Cadillac front bumper (minus the turn signal pods), taillights taken out of the fins, and rear bumper ends elongated vertically with two round lights floating inside a concave brushed aluminum panel. From the sides, the 1960 appeared much changed, looking close to what would become the regular 1961 Caddys.

In fact, the 1961s borrowed so much from Brougham styling that there really was no longer any reason to produce these once-distinctive automobiles. As a result, the Brougham made a quiet, regal exit to become one of the most obscure Cadillac collectibles of the post-World War II era. Now, all of the 904 Cadillac Eldorado Broughams produced from 1957 to 1960 are quite collectible.

To learn about Cadillac Eldorado Brougham specifications, continue on to the next page.

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