1951 Ford F-1

1951 Ford Trucks

Ford trucks received a number of revisions for 1951. Restyled for the first time since their 1948 debut, Ford's F-Series conventionals and C-Series Cab-Over-Engine trucks received modified front fenders, grille cavity, and grille. Also changed were the hoods and cabs, along with the dashboard and rear window, which was now substantially larger for better visibility.

Also for 1951 -- and for the first time since the late 1930s -- Ford offered truck buyers two levels of cab trim: the standard Five Star Cab and the deluxe Five Star Extra Cab. The latter came with such niceties as foam seat padding, extra sound-deadening material, bright metal trim around the windshield and vent windows, an argent-finished grille bar, locks and armrests on both doors, two-toned seat upholstery, a dome light, and twin horns.

Resplendent in its cherry-red paint, whitewall tires, and chrome trim, this restored 1951 Ford F-1 truck looks ready for a night on the town; most pickups of the era weren't dressed nearly as well. This truck shows off that year's new look, with revised front fascia, grille, and hood trim.

Pickup beds now had a wood floor rather than steel, and note the larger rear window that accompanied the 1951 redesign. As advertised on its nose, this truck carries Ford's 239-cubic-inch flathead V-8, still rated at 100 horsepower.

1951 Ford F-1 Panel Truck

Another change for 1951 was that the F-Series designation no longer appeared on the cowl, as evidenced by this F-1 Panel Truck. Instead, it was stamped into the leading edge of the hood's side-trim "spear."

1951 Ford F-5

Popular with farmers, a Ford F-5 truck could be fitted with a nine- or 12-foot Stake Body.

1951 Ford F-8

A 1951 F-8 tractor truck hauls a trailer load of Vernor's ginger ale. It is fitted with the cast wheels and demountable rims newly available that year.

1951 Ford F-8

Another Ford F-8 tractor truck sports special wheels that combine a demountable-rim feature with a standard eight-lug bolt pattern. It also has an aftermarket dual-rear-axle conversion that allowed for a higher-than-stock GVW.

In the next section, learn about the overhead-valve six- and eight-cylinder engines introduced to Ford trucks in 1952.

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