It's easy to think back on the Nash Rambler only as a quaint little 1950s economy car; pleasant and frugal, but slow and about as exciting as tapioca pudding. But that point of view is wrong.

Rambler Image Gallery

The Rambler had a unique look and appeal that matched its quality engineering and performance.
The Nash Rambler had a unique look and appeal
that matched its quality engineering
and performance. See more pictures of Rambler cars.

It's not the way people viewed Ramblers when they first appeared. As a matter of fact, top automotive writers who tested the Rambler when it came out thought it was one of the hotter-performing cars on the market -- meaning fast.

After test-driving a Rambler convertible, Motor Trend's Walt Woron stated "it is definitely not a small car in performance and comfort."

Tom McCahill, Mechanix Illustrated's bombastic but well-liked road tester, put a Rambler wagon through its paces. He wrote, "I was frankly amazed at the pick-up .... Zero to 60 in 16.9 seconds wasn't bad but the real surprise was going zero to 30 in 4.4 seconds! This is jump starting in any league." McCahill also declared himself "highly impressed with the way this wagon held the flat corners of the Nash test track at high speeds."

If anything, Speed Age writer Ted Koopman was even more enthusiastic, calling Rambler "the nearest approach to the MG produced in America today. The Rambler corners and accelerates nearly as well as the best MG. On winding roads the Rambler will give any car a bad time."

To find out more about the development of the low-priced Rambler, continue on to the next page.

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