The 1948 Buick Roadmaster is another late-40s convertible that owes its success in one way or another to the post-war buying frenzy surrounding the end of World War II. Buick completely restyled on the eve of World War II, so its design was technically just a year old when civilian production resumed in late 1945. That means its cars still looked fresh, so it's no wonder that sales went nowhere but up.

1948 Buick Roadmaster
The 1948 Buick Roadmaster stood out from the pack of
post-war convertibles due to Buick's prewar restyling.
See more pictures of classic convertibles.

Although there were far fewer Buick models than in '42, the 1946-48 lineups again included convertibles in the mid-range Super series (124-inch wheelbase) and top-line Roadmaster (129). Both used smooth straight-eight power -- a 248 and a 320, respectively -- and engine tweaking for 1948 increased horses to 115 and 150. But the big news that year was Dynaflow automatic transmission, a $244 option exclusive to Roadmasters. Though not as responsive as Hydra-Matic, Dynaflow proved so popular that Buick had to double planned installations. So equipped, a Roadmaster ragtop sold for $3081 -- rather pricey then. Still, most of the 11,503 built probably got the new automatic -- and definitely got a lot of looks.

1948 Buick Roadmaster, Interior
The styling of the interior hearkened to prewar styles while other
automakers went in new directions.

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