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1941-1947 Hudson


1941 Hudson's Symphonic Styling

The 1941 Hudson's "Symphonic Styling" referred not only to the body (which had "lines that flow in unbroken harmony from front to modish new rear"), but more particularly to "a wide choice of interior color combinations that harmonize with exterior colors ... at no extra cost."

All 1941 Hudsons offered Symphonic Styling, which coordinated interior and exterior colors.
All 1941 Hudsons offered Symphonic Styling,
which coordinated interior and exterior colors.

Common practice, at least in the low- and medium-price range, had been to use a common denominator cloth interior in closed cars, a gray or brown hue that would compliment (or at least not clash with) any of the exterior colors. For 1941, though, Hudson headlined "interiors that harmonize with exterior colors," thereby completing the musical metaphor.

The Model 10 Six cars had two choices of interior fabric; a gray-stripe cloth that was used in cars with gray or blue paint, and a tan-stripe cloth that went with black, green, tan, maroon, bronze, or red cars. Supers and Commodores, both sixes and eights, used the same gray and tan fabrics, but added a green interior for use with black or green cars.

Several two-tone paint combinations were available at extra cost, with the lighter hue on the roof and greenhouse area.

The quieter, new three-speed synchromesh transmission could be ordered with an automatic vacuum clutch that was repackaged for 1941 as Vacumotive Drive. Optional on the cars, Vacumotive was standard on the All-Purpose Delivery route van, which was new for the year.

Running boards were standard on the 1941 Hudson Commodore Six convertible.
Running boards were standard on the 1941 Hudson
Commodore Six convertible.

Other accessories for 1941 Hudsons included conveniences like an electric clock for the glove box door, a cigarette lighter, and the Weather-Master heater. Directional signals, a $13.75 option, were operated with a steering-column mounted push button. The signals flashed the front fender lamps and tailights, the fender lamps themselves being a separate $10.90 item except on Commodores, which had them as standard equipment.

Three radios were available, an inexpensive manually tuned "Junior," the "Deluxe" with push-button tuning, and the eight-tube superheterodyne "Custom" model. Any radio could have a vacuum-operated antenna for an additional $6.50. Running boards, standard on Commodores, could be ordered on other cars at extra cost.

An ironic accessory was the set of "Deluxe" seat covers, made of the "best grade fibre matting." These were "colored to harmonize with all 1941 interiors," the better to cover up the "wide selection of interior colors," apparently.

Hudson did not preserve many prewar production records, so it's impossible to tell how many of any particular model were produced. Most widely quoted are calendar year shipments, which include export cars. For 1941 there were 79,529 shipments, of which 812 were commercials. One source cites model year output as 82,051 sixes and 9718 eights.

Follow Hudson's evolution through the next model year by continuing to the next page.

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