The Ford Motor Company proved its ability to adapt during the difficult post-Depression years of the 1930s. The innovative Ford trucks and cars made during this time managed to remain fairly priced -- an act of flexibility that helped Ford survive the decade.

The Thirties dawned in a dismal state as the Great Depression took hold. People were out of work, standing in breadlines, and money to buy anything -- let alone new cars and trucks -- was scarce. Profits made during the Roaring Twenties seemed to disappear overnight, and many automakers didn't weather the financial storm.

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Ford managed to survive, of course, partly due to its sheer size and depth of resources. But the company helped its own cause by not resting on its laurels, instead bringing out better-looking, better-performing vehicles offered in a greater variety of models. And steady price cuts didn't hurt, either.

Styling changes to the 1930 and 1931 Model A cars and Model AA trucks made them look fresh, and several special models were added to widen the make's appeal. But this turned out to be just a warm-up for what was soon to come.

During these years, chief rival Chevrolet offered a six-cylinder engine, which was considered a competitive advantage over the four-cylinder found in the Model A. So when Henry Ford began brainstorming a successor to the A, he decided to trump Chevrolet with a V-8 engine.

The Ford trucks of 1930 featured revised styling and sleek looks. Read about the Ford trucks that kicked off the decade in the next section.

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